anchorman

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anchorman last won the day on November 21 2015

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About anchorman

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  • Birthday 07/22/1958

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    Don

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    RAV 4 SR 2.2 D4D 150 in Decuma Grey and Daihatsu Sirion 2008 with Yaris mechanics.
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    Derbyshire

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  1. Hello Anchorman. Thank you for all the advice that you have provided us here. I really need your help as an experienced mechanic.

    I own a 2007 Rav4. 2.2 l diesel engine. 2AD-FTV.

    It has these symptoms.

    We cleaned the EGR valve and the intake manifold. The manifold had signs of oil in it. When we used a carbon cleaner for the intake valves,the mechanic told me that the turbocharger was blowing oil. Since the car was working fine,I planned to check the turbo after the vacations. I did around 200 km without any kind of problems but what I did notice was the last 100. When my RPM was around 1200-2200 and when i was driving in a mauntin road,I saw a loooot of fumes coming out from my tailpipe grey to blak (dont know if this is the correct word). Over 2200 rpm and in normal conditiones there is no smoke visible from my mirrors. I stoped the car at the hotel and after the engine was cold i checked the level of the oil and the antifrize. Oil level was ok,or slightly lower,probably less than 100 ml. But for my surprize i found oil in my antifrize reservoir. It was not a lot. Also in the cap of the reservour i found traces of milky oil (I know,probably head gasket)

    My questions are:

    1.Since the fumes/gases are only when turbo is suposed to work and it seems that i don't have anymore the power of the turbo when accelerating are these signs of a blown turbo?

    2.is it possible that i have not a blown headgasket ,just the oil cooler mixing oil with antifrize? (A friend of mine had the same symptom once at it was its oil cooler)

     

    I live in Albania/europe and to be honest I don't think that here we can do a compression test. Also the mechanics tends to rip off. Even if it was just the headgasket and the turbo,i would finish paying for a lot of other things.

    Thank you man,for your time.

    Endri

     

  2. RAV 4.1 Maintenance

    4.1 Items TIMING BELT.pdf Front Suspension; FRONT SUSPENSION.pdf Rear Suspension; REAR SUSPENSION.pdf Brakes; brakes.pdf Wiring Diagrams; WIRING.pdf General Maintenance; MAINTENANCE.pdf Heater; HEATER.pdf Centre (3rd) Diff; CENTER DIFFERENTIAL LOCK.pdf Charging System; charging.pdf Replace 5th gear - see 4.2 section ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- General/Misc items SERVICE DATA SHEETS http://www.toyotaownersclub.com/forums/topic/109888-service-data-sheets/?hl=%2Bservice+%2Bdata+%2Bsheets Uploading A New Avatar Image chatman Auto (ignition) Door Locking, This Procedure Worked. prince Uploading Pictures Into Forum Topics, Adding Pictures to Topics... chatman Clean Engine Bay anchorman How to tint windows andyf3854 Charlie Farlie's guide to machine polishing Charlie Farlie
  3. Transmission oil change Rav4.3

    Oh sorry, I think you asked me about this before. The transfer box and the rear diff is done every second service or intervals of 20k miles. There is no requirement to change the oil in the box, one of these sealed for life jobbies. However, I will do mine about every 4th year. Use only the proper 75 grade oil and sit down before paying for it. I always take off the undershield to do the transmission oil. Take the plug out of the transfer box and let it drain (green circle). Don't bother with the level plug, there is a filler plug high up (blue arrow) which is easier to get at; 0.45 litres of GL5 80W/90 You might find one of these useful; http://www.toolbox.c...se-15887-110762 OK, if you do choose to change the gearbox oil you need to remove the drain plug; Then the filler plug; But don't try to fill it through the front unless you have the above pump as you can't tip normal oil bottles up. Instead, take off the small access panel under the wing (2 clips) and fill from under there. It only takes 2.1 litres; OK now round the back of the vehicle and take out the drain plug (green circle - passenger side). Because of the internal clutch this will come out filthy; Now round to the drivers side and take out the level plug (blue circle). Fill with 0.55 litres of GL5 80W/90 and you will see why one of those pumps is a good investment - it is very awkward with an oil bottle!; PLEASE NOTE:- 2009 on models should use SX API GL5 85W/90 for the transfer box and diff' according to the data sheets. The only place I've managed to find this is from Toyota themselves.
  4. Difficulty - Medium Time - about 90 minutes Tools required - 12mm socket and spanner (various extentions etc). Flat blade screwdriver. Pliers. It is easier done off ramps or over a pit and the rest of the text assumes that the sump tray has been removed. Parts (supplied by Kingo); 45221-42080 - £143.60 inc VAT and delivery You may also need a new clip for the bottom of the steering column boot; 90460-64003 - £6 inc VAT and delivery These prices are of August 2012 and could change with time but it will give you a feel for the cost. Introduction Some RAVs suffer with a clunk when turning the steering wheel. The US guys refer to it as a "popping noise" but the ones I have come across have a definite clunk that can be heard more at low speed and curiously sometimes more going backwards. At the same time as the clunk you get the feel of it in the steering wheel. This is the car we worked on. A European diesel engined variant belonging to Bramley (access underneath may be different on the US gasoline engined variants); The problem was identified some time ago as the "steering intermediate shaft" and this called for No 1 and No 2 shaft to be replaced. These are precision parts and are not cheap. However, the latest instructions call for only the No 1 shaft to be replaced. This image shows the parts we are talking about. This is the new No 1 shaft alongside the old; This is the clip; In the UK there have been two bulletins on this subject but the latest shows that the part number has been changed once again following a slight change to the internal dimensions of No 1 shaft. Here is that bulletin; New steering TSB.pdf You can see that the changes are shown as a reduced internal diameter and swing range. Quite what the swing range is, I'm not sure but it could be something that is lost in translation between Japanese and English. I can tell you that visually there is very little difference between the two parts but there is no doubt that it cures the problem. The steering on our donor car is "as quiet as the grave" with the new part fitted. If you have already fitted one of the earlier revisions, don't feel that you have to replace it with this new part. My 2010 RAV is actually fitted with an earlier version and is not a problem. It is worth remembering that if you get a clunk within the warranty period that TGB will change the part FOC. There is no recall because the fault does not represent a safety issue. If you have the clunk but are broke or it doesn't bother you then simply leave it for another day. Procedure I did this off ramps out in the sunshine. There is a bit of preparation necessary before you start. It is vital that the steering wheel isn't turned while the shaft is disconnected. This is to avoid damaging the so called "clock spring" connection to the steering wheel air bag. I achieved this by using one of my big woodworking clamps fixed gently to the steering wheel and it rested under nothing more than its own weight onto the centre console (US guys will obviously be working backwards); For fine alignment the steering wheel hub was lined up with the switch cowl as shown here; OK, now ready to start proper. Inside the car, peel back the carpet to gain access to the lower column cover. It is held on with 2 finger tight plastic nuts; The cover is split to pull back over the shaft. With that removed you can see the clamp bolt that holds No 2 shaft to No 1. Use a 12mm socket to remove the bolt. The shaft can now be slid upwards. If it is stuck, just tap a stubby screwdriver or small chisel into the slot then wriggle it up. Move the shaft to one side; The boot (described as the steering column hole cover in the bulletin) needs unclipping next. Just ease the clip in the direction of the green arrow to release the bottom then slide it in the direction of the orange arrow to unhook it from the bulkhead; Now from under the car, reach up to remove the clip from the rubber boot. I will show you more about the clip later but to remove it, just use a screwdriver to gently ease the outer coil outwards. It will click and relax as the tension comes off; Now push the boot upwards, all the time bending and twisting it to ease it over the No 1 shaft; I used a dab of paint to just mark the position of the shaft. I used silver when red would have been better for you to see as the flash has bleached it out. It isn't vital that you get it back on exactly the same spline but it wants to be near to line the bolts up properly; I had trouble getting a socket to the bottom bolt but was able to get a spanner in to undo it. You can get your hand around the side of the subframe to help get a bit of force on it; With the bolt out you can push the shaft off the steering rack. Now we can look at the parts. The only damage I could see to the shaft was some corrosion and fretting of the spline. This doesn't tally with the TSB which talks about the inner spline but as far as I could see, it looked OK in there; Moving on to the stainless steel clip, you must fit a new one if the original is damaged. Do not be tempted to use a tie wrap or a hose clip for the sake of £6. This clip will stop water from entering the cabin if you wade the car to anywhere near the maximum of 500mm (20 inches). This special clip exerts even pressure over the whole circumference. I have seen in the past that it has outwitted some "techy's" and has been left off. Just to show you how it works I have shown how to set it. Using a pair of pliers, squeeze the clip gently on the two protrusions as shown by my trust assistant; The sections will slide in and click as you can see on this comparison. If you can't resist fiddling and set it in error just use a small screwdriver to unlatch it and then put it down before you do any more damage!!! What is important is that you fit it over the boot now as you will be really fed up if you fit the new shaft and then find you have forgotton it - it can't go on after. Start building it up. Put the No 1 shaft onto the steering rack making sure the spline is aligned with the paint mark and tighten the bolt. Next feed the boot complete with the clip over the shaft and manoeuvre down intil it engages the boss. There is a hole to help you align it. Set the clip with pliers as shown above. Go inside the car and fit the top of the boot. It hooks onto the body at the top then just pull it back until it clicks at the bottom. Now wriggle the No 2 shaft back down onto the No 1 shaft. As soon as it engages, check that the steering wheel hasn't moved. Push the shaft right down until you can feed the bolt into the hole and tighten it up. The torque for both clamp bolts is 35 Nm (25 ft/lbs). There is no way that I could get a torque wrench to the bottom one but you might if you have suitable universal socket joints. Feed the cover over the shaft and fix it finger tight with the two plastic nuts. Put the carpet back and remove the clamp from the steering wheel. Go underneath and replace the sump shield.
  5. Rear brake overhaul

    Difficulty - Medium Time - Allow 60 minutes per side. Tools required - A pair of 8mm bolts, screwdriver, spring release tool (can be manufactured), some coppergrease or HM grease and a selection of usual mechanics tools. Introduction Most 4.2 and 4.3 RAVs employ a rear disc brake and combine a drum parking brake into the design. The rear disc brake (foot brake) is a simple single piston design with a reacting bridge to the outer pad. In this design, when the inner pad touches the disc and cannot move any further, the outer pad is applied when the bridge is slid along guide pins with an equal and opposite force. Changing the rear discs and changing the handbrake shoes goes hand in hand. Only when the shoes are in near perfect condition does it make sense not to change them. The handbrake is a "static brake", in other words it should only ever be operated when the vehicle is at a stand. For this reason, in theory it should never wear out. However, if new shoes are fitted with an old disc or vice versa, it follows that no "bedding" can take place and this is the reason that you should normally fit new with new. Having said that, there is a procedure for bedding a combination of old and new but this must be done with great care and is shown in a later pdf. I won't pretend this is the easiest job in the world but in my opinion it is much easier than the 4.2. If you are only changing the pads then you will be able to pick out the information that applies to you but you should not change the discs without changing the pads and the handbrake shoes unless they are virtually unworn. This tutorial is showing the right hand rear brake (drivers side UK, passenger side US) CLICK THE IMAGES TO ENLARGE THEM! I will start by showing you how I lifted and supported the car as this gets asked from time to time. I lift under the lower suspension arm; I support the vehicle under the front of the trailing arm (have you noticed the exhaust leak!); If you are only changing the pads, undo the lower 14mm headed bolt and swing the caliper up. As I was removing the disc I undid both and removed the caliper. It sits nicely on the suspension arm at the back. Now just prize out the pads with a screwdriver (for changing the pads only, jump forward to pushing the piston in); Now undo the two 17mm headed bolts and remove the carrier from the hub; By using a screwdriver through the wheel studs, rotate the disc until the hole in the disc is aligned with the adjuster; Then use a screwdriver to de-adjust the shoes inside. Look at the diagram for handbrake adjustment to see which way to turn. http://www.toyotaownersclub.com/forums/topic/77298-maintenanceimprovement-tips-43/ Now a drop of WD40 in the threaded holes and use a pair of 8mm bolts to draw the disc off; Now you can see inside OK and it will be grubby to say the least. I will show you how the springs go after so don't worry about them just now. The hub has a number of cut outs which are your best friend. Rotate the hub to give more access to the brake parts. They don't look much but trust me they really make it easier. You can use a pair of pliers to remove the front spring; ........and I just popped the rear spring off with a screwdriver. Each shoe has a hold down clip. I put my finger on the back of the pin and then with a pair of pliers, push the clip in and grip the head. Turn it 90 degrees and it will pop off. Now from under the brake, unhook the lower spring and pull the shoes off. There is a metal link which acts a compensating arm at the top. When this drops off, the handbrake lever will pop right off. Leave it attached to the handbrake cable. This will all make sense when you see it. Ok, now time to have a clean up. I washed it all down with soluble degreaser and wiped clean with a rag. Now wash the brake parts off. I have assembled them here so you can see how the springs go. You can see the compensating plate at the top which as well as acting as a bell crank to apply the opposite shoe, holds the handbrake lever in position. The threaded part of the adjuster goes to the back and the two top springs hook onto the backplate when assembled. You can also see that I use special ceratec grease which is specially for brakes. You can use high melting point grease but use copper grease as a last resort as it congeals with age. The retaining clips face down as shown when fitted. OK now back to the car. Wipe a smear of grease onto the contact points on the backplate - where the shoes rub. You also want some on the round abutments and each end of the adjuster - everywhere there is metal to metal contact. First hook the front shoe onto the brake. Put the retaining clip on. It's a fiddle but while holding the head of the pin, align the cut out and push the clip on and then turn the head 90 degrees. Now put the compensating plate in the top and hook the front shoe spring to the anchor on the back plate. Now after greasing the hand brake lever pin, insert it into the shoe and locate it into the compensating plate. Hook the spring into the plate and then anchor it onto the backplate. Now attach the retaining clip into the rear shoe and that will stop the hand brake lever from keep trying to pop off. Now fit the adjuster underneath. Hook the long side of the spring into the rear shoe first and then hook it into the front shoe so it is all assembled as the picture above. When done correctly it will look like this from above; ........and this from underneath; After washing the protective compound off the disc, fit it with two wheel nuts. Now working inside the car, completely de-adjust the handbrake cable. Now adjust the parking brake shoes following the link to the tutorial above. OK, now fit the caliper carrier (pop out the slide pins and clean and grease them). Lie the old pads against the new ones and transfer the wear indicators and the shims onto the new ones. Apply a smear of grease onto the contact points and fit the pads to the carrier. Now use a clamp to push the piston back in; and then fit the caliper. Do both sides then adjust the cable inside the car. Press the brake pedal a couple of times and expect it to go to the floor until the pads contact the disc. Follow the pinned instructions for settling the shoes and do not over adjust the handbrake. Torque settings; Caliper carrier - 88Nm (65 ft/lbs) Caliper retaining bolts - 26.5 Nm (20 ft/lbs) Wheel nuts - 103 Nm (76 ft/lbs)
  6. Disable the VSC for MOT

    I was recently reminded by our good friend Fujisan that as some 4.3s will be due for the first MOT this year that it might be a good idea to review this subject and I will pin it for future use. The VSC is such that if you use conventional means to test the brakes (brake roller tester with one wheel being tested at a time) it will pick that up as the vehicle out of control as one wheel is turning and three are not. The system cannot detect that the vehicle is stationary because there is a speed sensor on each wheel (used for vehicle speed detection rather than ABS operation - very unusual). The one turning wheel will fool the system into thinking that the vehicle is in motion. For this reason the VSC MUST be disabled otherwise when the first wheel turns in isolation from the others it will try to lock up the transmission in 4WD and the brake tester will force the wheel to turn against the locked transmission. Serious damage could result as you will be trying to haul a ton and a half of RAV out of the brake roller by one wheel against partially applied brakes because the tester is pressing the brake pedal!!! It is a potential RAV transmission/VSC infighting thing! A main dealer should know what has to be done and will install his DLC3 tester and set it to "brake test" which will disable the VSC/Traction Control. However, I for one will not be going to the dealer for MOT (purely as a matter of convenience) and if anyone else has similar plans then the VSC has to be disabled. It is extremely risky to assume that the independent tester knows about this very unusual system and wouldn't just go ahead and test it in the normal way. There are three ways to ensure the test is conducted without risk. You personally don't have to do it yourself but it would be wise to print this out and take it to the MOT station and make sure they are very aware. Here are the three methods; 1. Use the press brake/hand brake method described here; Begin with the parking brake off and the engine off. Start engine. Apply parking brake and press the foot brake twice then let the parking brake off again. Press the foot brake and pull the parking brake on and off twice then let the foot brake off again. Finally pull the parking brake on and press the brake twice. The VSC light will now come on and stay on until you switch the ignition off again after which the VSC defaults to on again. 2. Use a piece of wire to short out the pins 4 and 12 of the DLC plug shown here; Here is a photo of the plug just by the bonnet pull; 3. Raising the vehicle off the ground Then there is this method but it is labour intensive and the MOT tester isn't likely to thank you for it! It requires the other wheels to be allowed to turn while the individual brakes are tested (albeit fail safe as no damage can be done). It means the car has to be lifted to get the remaining wheels off the ground and the handbrake off so that all wheels can turn freely when the transmission locks up - like this; Remember that this also has to be done when testing the rear wheels and the tester is going to love that too! The easiest way is in disabling the VSC as described in either 1. or 2. above. The first is easy enough with a bit of practice and the second needs a bit of confidence but is also easy. I printed the first procedure and left it in the glove box. Just remember that when taking the car for test to have it disabled and don't worry - the first time the ignition is switched off the VSC will reset itself so do that before leaving.
  7. I was recently reminded by our good friend Fujisan that as some 4.3s will be due for the first MOT this year that it might be a good idea to review this subject and I will pin it for future use. The VSC is such that if you use conventional means to test the brakes (brake roller tester with one wheel being tested at a time) it will pick that up as the vehicle out of control as one wheel is turning and three are not. The system cannot detect that the vehicle is stationary because there is a speed sensor on each wheel (used for vehicle speed detection rather than ABS operation - very unusual). The one turning wheel will fool the system into thinking that the vehicle is in motion. For this reason the VSC MUST be disabled otherwise when the first wheel turns in isolation from the others it will try to lock up the transmission in 4WD and the brake tester will force the wheel to turn against the locked transmission. Serious damage could result as you will be trying to haul a ton and a half of RAV out of the brake roller by one wheel against partially applied brakes because the tester is pressing the brake pedal!!! It is a potential RAV transmission/VSC infighting thing! A main dealer should know what has to be done and will install his DLC3 tester and set it to "brake test" which will disable the VSC/Traction Control. However, I for one will not be going to the dealer for MOT (purely as a matter of convenience) and if anyone else has similar plans then the VSC has to be disabled. It is extremely risky to assume that the independent tester knows about this very unusual system and wouldn't just go ahead and test it in the normal way. There are three ways to ensure the test is conducted without risk. You personally don't have to do it yourself but it would be wise to print this out and take it to the MOT station and make sure they are very aware. Here are the three methods; 1. Use the press brake/hand brake method described here; Begin with the parking brake off and the engine off. Start engine. Apply parking brake and press the foot brake twice then let the parking brake off again. Press the foot brake and pull the parking brake on and off twice then let the foot brake off again. Finally pull the parking brake on and press the brake twice. The VSC light will now come on and stay on until you switch the ignition off again after which the VSC defaults to on again. 2. Use a piece of wire to short out the pins 4 and 12 of the DLC plug shown here; Here is a photo of the plug just by the bonnet pull; 3. Raising the vehicle off the ground Then there is this method but it is labour intensive and the MOT tester isn't likely to thank you for it! It requires the other wheels to be allowed to turn while the individual brakes are tested (albeit fail safe as no damage can be done). It means the car has to be lifted to get the remaining wheels off the ground and the handbrake off so that all wheels can turn freely when the transmission locks up - like this; Remember that this also has to be done when testing the rear wheels and the tester is going to love that too! The easiest way is in disabling the VSC as described in either 1. or 2. above. The first is easy enough with a bit of practice and the second needs a bit of confidence but is also easy. I printed the first procedure and left it in the glove box. Just remember that when taking the car for test to have it disabled and don't worry - the first time the ignition is switched off the VSC will reset itself so do that before leaving.
  8. Difficulty - Easy Time - about 5 minutes Tools - Small screwdriver, coin or similar implement Parts - 2016 battery (98p from Screwfix) Introduction The battery in the key should be changed periodically (not more than 2 years) and this tutorial shows how to conduct this easy job. Procedure Remove any key rings and use a small screwdriver to open the outer case in the slot provided as shown; Now use the same screwdriver to carefully prize the battery module out of the outer casing; Set aside the outer casing and use a coin or similar implement to open the battery module in the position shown; Now with the inner case open use the small screwdriver to pop the battery out; When you open the new battery use some clean tissue or kitchen roll to carefully wipe it and remove the protective coating. Take extra care not to hold the battery accross the flat sides but only on the edge. Holding it on the flat sides will discharge it through your fingers in seconds; Put the battery back into the case and assemble the various parts by snapping them together. There is no need to reprogram the key but test it to ensure it works.
  9. Oil Change - 2.2 D4D

    Difficulty - Easy Time - about 45 minutes. Frequency - 10,000 miles or 12 Months Tools required - 14mm socket and ratchet with extension bar. Filter wrench (examples shown below). Drain container. Jug or measure to re-fill oil. If you decide to remove the sump shield you will need the 10mm socket and a trim tool or screwdriver to pop out the fixing studs. A phillips screwdriver to remove the clips in the access flaps. A torque wrench if you have one. Parts - 5.9 litres of 5W/30 Semi Synthetic oil (I paid £12.97+VAT for 5 litres). I only use Morris's oil; http://www.morrislubricants.co.uk/ 1 oil filter - 04152-31060, later part No 01452-OR010 - £9.60 inc VAT (See Kingo for discounted price delivered to home address). This is the proper oil filter socket with cut outs to engage the lugs on the filter housing. Either Google or search ebay and type in "Lexus oil filter socket". Laser do a cheaper pressed steel version. Introduction The oil not only has the job of lubricating the many moving parts of the engine it also accounts for about 30% of the cooling and has many other functions. These include anti foaming agents and suspension additives that stop dirt from settling and detergents to keep the inside of the engine clean. The viscosity or "thickness" of the oil is determined by a viscosity index number. Thin oil starts at zero and the higher the number the thicker it gets. The oil for the 2.2 D4D is stated as 5W/30. This means that the oil is thin when cold (5W - winter viscosity) and 30 for summer or warm. The oil is able to change its viscosity with temperature as it is fortified with a structure that bulks up as the temperature rises and maintains its lubricating qualities through a wide temperature range. The oil is in an extremely hostile environment. Inside the engine it is subject to extremes of pressure and temperature. It becomes contaminated with carbon and fuel which escapes in small quantities past the pistons and as the engine cycles through temperature it produces significant amounts of condensation which is also suspended in the oil. Over time these contaminants create quite a corrosive cocktail and so must be renewed periodically to maintain engine life. Healthy oil will significantly improve the lifespan of seals, gaskets and timing chains in addition to major engine components. If there is one piece of advice that you will benefit from more than any other it is to change the oil at least as specified if not sooner. My RAV has done just less than 13k and is not 2 years old until September but because of the low mileage I have changed the oil 3 times in this period. Generally the lower the mileage the more water gets into the oil and frequent changes are adviseable. Those vehicles doing 10-12k per year or more are less vunerable and can comfortably be left the full year or 10k whichever comes first. The oil and filter change forms the basis of the intermediate service. Even if you have to buy some items to get set up you can then change your own oil and ask your Toyota Centre to do the rest of the service which will cost considerably less. In summary the oil is the life blood of the engine. If you neglect anything else you risk damage. If you neglect the oil you will definitely ruin the engine. Procedure The oil becomes extremely hot so be sure to change the oil when the engine is warm. Warm oil will also drain out of the engine more thoroughly. To help with the clarity of the photos I put the car onto ramps but it is possible to do it on a level surface or to aid the process slightly you can drive it onto sturdy blocks of wood. Do not use concrete blocks or bricks as they can crumble under the weight. It is possible to gain extra access by driving the drivers side wheel onto a convenient kirb. The onus on gaining more access safely is with you! If you have sensitive skin use barrier cream or disposable gloves and have a good supply of rags for any spillage. Accessing the sump plug and filter is done through 2 flaps in the sump shield. The left flap with the red arrow points to the filter and the right green arrow points to the sump plug. To undo the flaps unscrew the phillips screw carefully then pop out the stud with a trim tool or screw driver; You can see much better in this picture with the sump shield removed. Use the 14mm socket to remove the sump plug; and carefully position your container to catch the oil; While that is draining get ready to change the filter. The box comes with the new rubber O rings and also a drain adapter for draining the filter which would otherwise result in oil all over the place; Find a piece of hose or pipe to fit the adapter. Remove the plug in the filter case with the 14mm socket; then push the adapter and pipe into the filter which will lift a valve and drain the oil into your container; When the oil has drained remove the adapter which will automatically withdraw the old sealing ring> Use a socket or filter wrench to unscrew the filter housing; Remove the housing and filter and I worked in a tray on the bench. Drain and wipe out the filter housing with clean rags. Remove the old sealing ring and fit the new one. When you fit the new one do not roll it on but stretch carefully over the filter housing then work your way down to the groove. A twisted seal may leak oil; Lightly oil the new ring with clean engine oil. Clean out the housing on the engine with clean rags. Fit the new filter then screw the assembly back onto the engine. The torque is 40Nm or 30ft/lbs. If you don't have a torque wrench the filter needs to be nipped up tight but don't go mad! Clean the filter plug and fit the new O ring. Lightly oil the ring with clean engine oil and screw the plug back into the filter housing. The torque is 12.5 Nm or 9ft/lbs. Again if you do not have a torque wrench this only needs nipping with a short socket bar or 14mm spanner. Clean the sump plug and refit it to the sump. If the sealing washer is damaged in any way fit a new one (ask Kingo for a new one when ordering the filter). The torque for the plug is 38Nm or 28 ft/lbs or again if you don't have a torque wrench tighten it securely with the 14mm socket and ratchet. Fill the engine with 5.9 litres of 5W/30 semi Synthetic oil. In this photo I have removed the engine cover (it just pulls off) for clarity; With the oil added ensure the gearbox is in neutral and start the engine. Watch the dash board to see that no engine warnings are displayed. When the oil pressure rises in the engine you will hear the engine note change. Go back underneath and check the filter and sump plug are not leaking. Leave the engine running for 5 minutes then check again for leaks. If all is OK refit the flaps. Newer engines will use more oil than older ones so check the oil frequently with the dip stick until consumption has been established. To reset the oil service indicator do as follows; Set the multi-information display to TRIP A. Turn the ignition switch off. Press and hold the ODO / TRIP switch, and turn the ignition switch on (IG). After turning the ignition switch on (IG), keep holding the switch for at least 5 seconds. The reset procedure is complete. Dispose of the oil considerately. All local authority waste disposal sites will take waste oil so will most local garages if you have a good relationship with one. The oily rags and old filter should be disposed of in the same way.
  10. Jacking Points

    In addition to the information supplied in the owner's manual, here is some information on the vehicle jacking points for the RAV 4.3. Please remember: Don't jack up a heavily loaded vehicle. If you're removing a heavy part (e.g. engine), the centre of gravity of the vehicle is likely to shift as you do it. Don't work under a vehicle just supported by the jack - it's not worth the risk. Use correctly placed wheel chocks if appropriate. Above all, always follow the appropriate safety precautions. If you have side steps fitted, there is some information on side jacking points here: Click Here - Jacking with Side Steps The central jacking positions for the 4.3 are: Front: Engine under cover Rear: Body lower back panel - You'll need a long reach jack. The rear lower back panel 4.3 jacking area: A slighly out of focus, 4.3 front jacking area: The information is supplied in good faith, but TOC and any of its members accept no liability for any damage, injury or loss sustained through use of the information provided. Please work safely.
  11. Adjust Handbrake

    Difficulty - Medium Time - The are 2 stages, one to adjust the brakes themselves and the other to adjust the cable. Cable 10 minutes Including brakes 1 hour. Tools - Jack and wheel brace, flat blade screwdriver, phillips No2 screwdriver, 10mm socket and suitable driver. Trim tool if available. 2 X 10mm spanners. Introduction The handbrake on all 4.3 RAVs is of the "drum in hat/exclusive" type. This consists of a small diameter drum brake which is positioned in the boss of the rear brake disc. Although a handbrake could be incorporated into the disc brake, these are becoming less popular because they rely entirely upon clamping force which requires high actuation force and are exposed to contamination if the vehicle should be used off road. Although the parking brake is efficient, it should be remembered that it is solely a static brake and should never be used dynamically because it is at a huge mecanical disadvantage - a tiny brake inside a large wheel. Even applying it just as the wheels are coming to a stand will eventually cause excessive wear of the components. As it is a static brake the linings should last indefinitely and the brake requires little maintenance. Once adjusted after the linings have bedded to the drum it should normally not be required again for the life of the vehicle. Occasionally the drum brakes may become inefficient due to lack of use, a build up of contaminants or incorrect use. If the linings have become wet (when the vehicle is waded to the depth of 300 - 500mm) the brake will be submerged and can be dried by applying the handbrake with a force of 10kgs for a distance not exceeding 400m at 30mph. If the linings have been replaced they can be bedded by using the same procedure but repeating the process after a cooling period of 1 minute a number of times as required. In this case the brake should be re-adjusted when completed. Once the brakes have been adjusted for the first time, any subsequent adjustment required is likely to be as a result of cable stretch. If you have no reason to suspect the brakes need further adjustment (you haven't renewed the linings etc) then it is acceptable to adjust the cable only. The cost for having the handbrake adjusted can vary. I have heard reports ranging from £25 - £65 which I presume depends on whether the foundation drum brakes have been adjusted or only the cable. Procedure To adjust the foundation parking brake shoes; Working on level ground safely chock the front wheels and release the hand brake. Observing all the usual precautions, jack up and remove one rear wheel. Ideally the vehicle should be jacked and supported on axle stands but if the supplied vehicle jack is used under no circumstances place any part of your body under the vehicle. As the disc is not fixed to the hub it is necessary to secure it by taking two of the wheel nuts and running them up to the disc. The hand brake adjuster is accessible through a rubber bung in the disc. Using a screwdriver, prize out the bung and rotate the disc (it will be stiff as you have to turn the transmission) until the toothed adjuster is visible - it will be somewhere near the bottom. Note - the photos of the disc are Wollastons 4.2 but for the purposes of this exercise they are the same; Use the screwdriver to engage the teeth of the adjuster; To adjust the brake you need to turn the adjuster as shown to expand the shoes; Turn the adjuster until it is no longer possible to move the disc then turn it backwards until the disc is just free. It is OK to hear it rubbing but it should not be tight. Turn the disc a full revolution to make sure there are no tight spots. When complete refit the rubber bung and the roadwheel. Go around and repeat the process at the other wheel but when finished do not lower the wheel to the ground. To adjust the hand brake cable; Go inside the car and use a trim tool or screwdriver to prize off the trim at the side of the gearstick. If you have not done this before you will think that you are going to break it but it is designed to come off. However, take care starting at the rear and as it comes up keep moving the tool under and towards the front to get a better purchase; There are 4 clips, three on the bottom and one facing forward at the front so lift it up at the back first then as soon as the bottom clips are free pull it back; Now get your lever under the gear lever gaiter and gently prize it up; Lift the gaiter over the gearstick out of the way but do not attempt to remove it. Now open the centre storage lid and prize off the panel that holds the mirror controls. This is the entire panel which goes around the gearstick - the mirror controls are on a smaller panel on it. The are no screws only clips; From under the panel squeeze the clips gently and push out the mirror control panel. Then press the clip and remove the wires; Remove these items to access the cable adjuster. Use the 2 X 10mm spanners to unlock the adjusting nut. Hold the bottom nut still and undo the top nut anti clockwise; Now turn the bottom nut clockwise to tension the cable. The specification calls for 7 - 9 clicks with a pulling force of 20kgs (44 lbs) - thats a heavy pull! The main thing is not to over adjust it so you should still feel some free play at the bottom of the lever travel. Keep adjusting and testing little by little. If you start at the bottom and pull, you should not feel any resistance until about the third click. As a check go back to the jacked up wheel and check that it turns freely. Replace all of the trim in the reverse order remembering to re-connect that cigar lighter. Lower the remaining wheel and don't forget to finally tighten the road wheel nuts to the specified torque of 76 ft/lbs. As a final check take the vehicle to an incline where it would normally just roll and check to see that it does so in both directions. For those that might prefer the handbrake to be on with just one click don't forget that if it binds it will get hot and cause a lot of damage so whatever happens make sure you do these checks to make sure it is free.
  12. Ipod Interface

    Difficulty - Medium Time - About an hour Tools - trim tool (example here) - http://www.diytools.co.uk/diy/Main/Product...ProductID=26229 or screwdriver with taped blade, 10mm socket and suitable driver, 30mm hole cutter or forstner bit and suitable drill. Introduction This procedure follows the fitting of the genuine Toyota interface which is available at a special price via Lindop Bros Toyota. It allows the use of the existing steering wheel controls and repeats some data on the radio display. It is also compatible with the latest generation 3 Ipod Nano NOTE; The £37 additonal Y loom is only necessary if something is already plugged into the external CD changer socket. In most cases this isn't the case so only buy it if you really need it. Procedure The full Toyota fitting instructions in full are here; http://techdoc.toyota-europe.com/legacy/To...%20000881-0.pdf First disconnect the battery; Then remove the glove box by releasing the damper; and squeezing the stops to allow the glove box to drop down; Allow the glove box to drop roughly level then just pull it to remove. Next carfully prize off the bottom of the radio bezel to remove it and press the clip on the plugs to remove the wires from the hazard warning and diff lock switches; Remove the 4 bolts that are holding the radio in and pull the radio forward. Remove the plugs and aerial from the back and remove the radio. Install the interface and loom. The instructions show that you place the interface behind the centre console forward trim. You remove it by pulling it out into the footwell as shown and then withdraw it back towards the seat; However, because of the soundproofing and trim I couldn't easily locate it there so I placed it up above the glovebox as shown. Use the supplied adhesive pad but use a tie wrap to secure it; Re-fit the radio and plug in all the connectors and aerial. The ipod interface loom also plugs in and it only fits in one socket so you cant go wrong. Next, use a 30mm drill to make a hole in the bottom of the upper cubby hole. I used a sharp forstner woodworking bit but any hole saw will do. The instructions show that you centre the hole 25mm from the back and the side of the cubby hole base but due to the support bracket it is not possible. I drilled in this location and it works OK; Make a good job of clipping the wires up. Insert the grommet as shown and the ipod connects as shown. With the battery lead re-connected turn the radio on and press the "disc" button twice to activate the external CD plug to which the ipod is connected. The ipod will show the Toyota logo and is then isolated as all functions are controlled from the radio head unit; How good is it? The reproduction is crystal clear and the tone and stereo separation is excellent. You can play each playlist and each track within the playlist. The track info is shown on the radio but you cannot search via artist, title or album name, the tracks are played alphabetically or randomly;
  13. Cabin (pollen) filter renewal

    Difficulty - Easy Time - 5 minutes. Tools - None Frequency - Normal Conditions: 14000 miles Dusty conditions: 12 months or 9000 miles UK Part No and price TBA by Lindop Brothers Toyota in subsequent post. Additional information - Further diagrams can be found on page 276/279 of the Owners Handbook (LHD shown). Filter may not be fitted to models with manual air conditioning. Introduction To improve the environment inside the car, a clean air filter is fitted to the heater intake. This is intended to remove dust and particles that would otherwise enter the car. The filter fitted to the RAV is a particulate filter which has been electrostatically charged to capture the finest particles that are also positive or negatively charged and attracted to the filter. New filters are snow white but soon become blackened by the volume of tiny particles trapped within them. The result as well as a fresher interior is cleaner interior and air vents etc. A filter that is becoming clogged will also starve the interior of fresh air and windows will quickly steam up so it is very important to replace the filter as at the correct interval or more frequently under dusty conditions. Replacement filters with an activated carbon core may become available which also remove odours that may occur for instance in heavy traffic. The filter will soon become clogged with flies and leaves etc. The blackening is due to dust and pollen (even smaller than the pores in the filter) that have been attracted to the filter fibres. It is very easy to access this filter so I recommend that you remove and clean the filter at least every 12 months and if it looks clogged, replace it. Procedure 1. Working from the passenger side, empty the glove box and remove the damper from the left hand side; 2. Squeeze the stops at either side of the glove box to allow it to drop down; 3. Drop the glove box to just below level to expose the mounting hinges and pull the glove box back towards the seat in order to detach it. With the glove box removed the white plastic access cover is clearly visible on the heater case. Press the clip on the left side to remove the cover outwards; 4. Withdraw the filter from the heater intake; 5. It can be seen in this photo how much debris has been trapped in 10 months/7500 miles (Note, the cleaner filter in this photo has been fitted for about a month and is already beginning to discolour). As an interim measure it is acceptable to turn the filter upside down and tap out the large objects onto a hard surface and vacuum the fine particles from the dirty side only. Avoid breathing the dust. It is unwise to leave replacement beyond the recommended intervals and essential not to leave the filter out all together. 6. To refit a new filter place it into the heater intake with the "UP" arrow positioned accordingly. Replace the cover, glovebox and glovebox damper.
  14. Fix rattling door mirrors

    Difficulty - Easy Time - About 10 minutes per side Tools - Small screwdriver, clear or black silicone Introduction There is a small access cover under each door mirror which is invariably not a tight fit and will cause quite a considerable amount of rattling at various speeds or wind conditions. The fix is easy and involves adding a small amount of silicone to the cover. Procedure This is the cover under the mirror. If you tap it you will find it loose and rattles. Use a small screwdriver to pop off the cover. Sometimes only one side rattles but while you are doing that you might as well do the other! Take care not to damage the paint or stick that screwdriver in yourself. Take the covers to the bench and apply 3 small beads of silicone to the cover as shown. Do not apply a full bead as you will stop water draining from the mirror and make future removal of the covers extremely difficult. Now go back and pop the covers back into their housing. The car can be driven immediately.
  15. Fit additional boot lighting

    Difficulty - Medium Time - about 90 minutes Tools required - Trim tool (example here) http://www.diytools.co.uk/diy/Main/Product...ProductID=26229 or similar lever. Phillips screwdriver, 10 and 14mm sockets and drivers. Drill and jig saw or similar cutting tool. Introduction The boot light is attached to the rear door which is not much good when the door is open. I got an additional light from a scrap yard and wired it in to come on with the existing switch so that it comes on automatically when the door is opened. Procedure First obtain a suitable light. I got this one from a scrap yard but the supplier could not be sure which kind of car it came from however it does say GM on it so it could be a Vectra or similar. In obtaining a light try to get one that has simple male spade terminals and it is probably best to avoid having a switched one but not essential. This probably came from a boot, glovebox or sunvisor so you can have a look around complete cars to find something suitable. If the wires to it have a unique plug, try to get the plug and about 75mm of wire to ease fitting. Here I am measuring the light to see what size hole I need to cut in the panel; There is a limit of how many photos can be attached to a post so follow the instructions in this pdf file to show how to get the rear quarter panel off. You will need to follow items 1,2 and 3 on page 8. Then items 6,7 and 8 on page 10 then the instructions on page 10 if you are going to do just the drivers side or both page 10 and 11 if you want to do the passenger side or both sides. http://techdoc.toyota-europe.com/aimupload...000%20386-1.pdf It doesn't matter which side you put the light in, I did the drivers side but you could do the other or better still both if you can find 2 matching lights. When you have the panel off it will look like this; Look at the panel and find a location that is fairly high up but will not foul anything at the back. I chose a location just forward of the top of the removable panel. Mark the position of the light; Cut out a piece of card the same size as the opening determined earlier. If anything make the opening on the small side and you can always open it up later if the light is tight. Centre the card on the marked position and then draw around it; Drill a hole then cut the aperture for the light. Don't have it too tight - keep making adjustments until just right. Now look inside the door frame on the hinge side where the rubber umbilical trunking carries the wires from the door. There are 2 plugs. You are working with the lower one and here I have disconnected it to show which wires you need to splice into; The wires are the ones nearest the camera marked in red. Peel back some of the protective sheath and run a length of twin core wire that is long enough to run to the chosen location. I don't like scotch locks in anything other than an entirely weather free location so I have used them here to splice into the two marked wires. Attach male spade terminals to the other end or the piece of wire attached to the plug if you got one with the light. Now is a good time to re-attach the battery earth lead and just test the light; Although I haven't got a second light I took this opportunity to run two looped in wires to the other side of the boot so that fitting a second one will only need me to take one panel off; Now you can refit all of the panels by reversing the instructions in the pdf file. Be sure to very securely clip up all of the wires and insulate any connections. Finally attach the wires to the light and pop the light into the panel;