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RupertRAV4

Registered Member
  • Content count

    22
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About RupertRAV4

  • Rank
    Club Member

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  • First Name
    Rupert

Profile Information

  • Toyota Model
    RAV4
  • Toyota Year
    2012
  • Location
    Oxfordshire
  1. D4d Scv Valve Replacement

    4.2 RAV4 D4-D SCV Valves: Ok, here goes with the details I know about the SCV valves and their replacement on the 4.2 RAV4 D4-D. Or at least this is how I did it, maybe not the best way but it worked for me! I have yet to look on the official Toyota technical website to see if there are any better instructions in their service manual. Background: The symptoms were fairly similar to others who have posted on the forum, ie: loss of power, especially at the top end of the rev range above 3000rpm. Sometimes it would be fairly intermittent and at others the RAV could not get out of its own way!! There was no MIL to start with but that soon changed..... It would come on and off but then it came on and stayed on. The DTC stored was P0627 relating mainly (as it says there could be something else causing the problem) to the SCV valves as below: I also checked the electrical side of the valves, but mine were both in spec. You can check for continuity between the valves and the engine block and resistance across the valves themselves: And if required the following shows the wiring between the SCV valves and the Engine ECU: New valves were purchased from Kingo [aka Parts-King on the Forum] for £194.16 inc. VAT & p&p. Part # is: 04221-27011 and is described as: "Pump Kit, Supply". Ace service from him! Replacement: Firstly I undid the two nuts holding the coolant tank in place. Then carefully lifted the tank off the studs (and the locating spigot under the tank) and moved it to the left. I managed to fix the right hand hole onto the left hand stud (if that makes sense!) and could then hold it in place with a nut put on finger tight. Just kept it nicely out the way although you could achieve the same thig using a cable tie I guess. Then I removed the air intake pipe running between the front of the intercooler and the throttle body. This is the main, large diameter black pipe in the photo below (the location of the SCV valves is highlighted by the red circle): Once this is done you should have something which looks like this: I also removed the nut holding the wiring loom trunking in place (in the green circle) to gain better access. The red circle is where the SCV valves are. To identify between the two valves, the front one is redish brown and is SCV 1, and the rearmost one is green and is SCV2. I did one valve at a time to ensure I didn't mix them up and started with the rear most one (closest to the engine block) as this is the most difficult to do because of the limited access. Always better to start with the hard one as when you're bored and tired the second one seems easier! After undoing the electrical connectors to each valve I then removed the cap/allen head screws holding the valves themselves in place. I needed to use a small screwdriver between the flange and the fuel pump to carefully prise the valve out of it's housing as it was quite tight. Once removed you can push the new one into place. Due to the limited access I could not push the valve fully home so used the fixing screws by tightening each screw a few turns each, alternating between each one, to make sure that it went in square. The other valve was changed in the same way but was a little easier due to the better access. The following photo shows the new rear (green) valve in place and the old front (red) one removed before fitting the new one: Once both new valves were in place I wiped up as much of the spilt diesel as I could (not much came out when the valves were removed really), just helps to check for leaks if the area you're checking is already dry. Then I replaced all the components I'd taken off. Not sure if it helped but I pressed the priming button on top of the fuel filter head until I felt resistance to make sure the fuel system was full. That's it! The engine started almost immediately and ran fine. On the second ignition cycle the MIL went out and has been out since (keeping my fingers crossed here!). I guess it will be a good idea to get the fault codes cleared at some point as the original DTC will still be present as a historic code. Always good practice to clear the fault codes once you have fixed the problem. The following photo shows the old valves. The new ones didn't look any different to be honest, except cleaner! All in it took about 1hour from start to finish. Hope this helps someone else! :)
  2. 4.2 D4d Scv Valve Replacement

    Hi Slomaran, I had a bit of an issue with the allen head bolts as well. Turns out the area where they seize is where the mating face of the head of the bolt mates on the flange of the SCV valve (rather than the thread of the bolt seizing into the fuel pump body itself - even though they look like stainless they do appear torust as you can see in the pics above). At least this was the case with mine. You could try tapping a wood chisel or a thin blade screwdriver between the bolt and the SCV flange to break the seize. Also, more generic options to be able to remove rounded allen head bolts like these you could try some of the following: Tap a larger size hex bit into the rounded bolt and use it to undo the bolt. Tap a Torx bit into it (the 'arms' of the Torx bit will grip in the rounded hex hole). Heat the head on the bolt with a very fine flame such as that from a gas soldering iron (be careful though as there's lots of plastic in and around the valves. Put some Chemical Metal into the head of the rounded bolt, tap a suitable bit into it (like suggested above) and let the Chemical Metal set. Then use this to undo the bolt. You'll need new bolts but they are pretty standard bolts so should be easy enough to come by. Thinking aloud, you could also try to get someone to weld (TIG or MIG) a hex onto the head of the rounded allen bolt and use this to remove it. You'd need to find a pretty handy welder as space is so tight and ensure the battery is disconnected before starting welding.
  3. P1135 Fault Code

    Just re-read the above and to clarify the MoT fail with the check engine light on - the car will fail for the emissions related fault which put the check engine light on - not just because the check engine light itself is on.....
  4. P1135 Fault Code

    The check engine light comes on for emissions related issues so your can't won't pass the MoT with it on (or it shouldn't...!). With an O2 sensor down the engine management will be using a default fueling and as mentioned economy will suffer as most likely will performance. Best bet is to get the sensor changed and have a sweet running RAV once more! You're correct in that the heater just heats the sensor up quicker from cold so it can control the exhaust emissions as soon as the engine is started from a cold start - needed for much more stringent emissions regs we have these days, rather than just letting the sensor be heated up by the exhaust gas.
  5. Toyota Previa D4d Engine Problem

    Have the SCV valves been checked out/replaced?
  6. Fun In The Snow!

    Just don't forget that the thing that makes the biggest difference is how you drive any of these vehicles. All these new electronic aids will only get you OUT of trouble - they won't stop you get INTO trouble in the first place- that is down to how you drive them. They only help because they react so much quicker than most humans to this going wrong. And that 4WD makes no difference when you're already going sideways....!!
  7. 4.2 D4d Scv Valve Replacement

    Sorry for the missing photos. I've been back into Photobucket and the photos should be back there. Please give me a shout if you can't see them.
  8. Useless Rav4

    Just to add my two-penn'th to the conversation for those who may be interested (Igor has got it pretty much spot-on) and bore those of you who aren't... The SCV valves actually LIMIT the fuel going through the high pressure fuel pump and into the common rail of the fuel injection system (and then into each injector). Since a diesel engine always has maximum air available (there is no throttle in a diesel engine. Well, there are these days but that's another conversation), then the engine load is controlled by the amount of fuel going into the engine - more fuel = more power/torque produced. Since the fuel pump is turning in direct proportion to engine speed (as it's driven by an engine driven belt) there may be times that there is too much fuel available (at high revs in a low gear for example) so the SCV valves control the fuel going into the fuel pump. Hence Suction Control Valves they control the inlet to the fuel pump - the suction side. They are solenoid valves but I'm guessing they are PWM (Pulse Width Modulated) or variable force solenoids so they are not just ON or OFF but can be anywhere between 0 and 100% open. What the failure mechanism is I don't know other than they can check out ok electrically but still not function correctly. Getting jammed up so they do not open fully may not be too far wide of the mark. The problem with the diagnosing the SCV valves problems seems to lie within some of garages inability to be able to properly diagnose faults (like most things there is a huge range - some garages are brilliant and some should not be in business...). The fault codes (DTC's) that usually get reported when something goes wrong only point you in the right direction - they do not 100% mean that component is at fault. With the SCV valves they fail and the result is insufficient fuel flow in response to a demand from pressing the accelerator pedal. This could result in various faults being reported for anything from low turbo boost pressure (hence new turbo being incorrectly fitted) to fuel pump faults (hence new fuel pumps being incorrectly fitted) to the actual DTC for the SCV valves themselves (P0627) On a few other points: Turbos mainly fail due to the bearings not being lubricated with oil properly. This is usually due to the turbo not being left to cool down when hot. The oil left in the turbo carbonises and either blocks the oilways or the carbon can wear the bearings. Always let turbos cool for a couple of minutes after hard running by driving gently for a few minutes before shutting the engine down. Also always use good quality oil or change cheaper oils often - especially if the car is used for lots of stop-start and short journies (ie less than 20miles in one go). Fuel injectors usually fail (well, the spray pattern in the combustion cylinder becomes poor so the fuel burns poorly) due to using poor quality fuels. More expensive branded fuels contain additives which help to keep the engine internals clean (including the intake valves, fuel pump and the injectors). Hope that reading this has helped burn off a bit of the Christmas turkey!!
  9. D4d Obdii

    Just bear in mind that the electrical side of the SCV's can be ok but the mechanical side is not so will still give the problem even though the electrical side checks out ok. This was the case with mine - electrical checks all ok but not mechanically. Changed them and cured the problem. No idea if you can check the mechanical side of ths SCVs before replacing them?
  10. What Is My Correct Engine Size

    Just read this post (bit slow I know) - brilliantly funny. Cheered up my day!!
  11. D4d Engine Fault

    From what I know about diagnotics, the engine light cannot come on without a fault code being stored and the ECU cannot clear the code itself without a diagnostic computer being plugged in and the code being cleared by hand. Historic fault codes will still be there, but the check engine light might go out if it doesn't register the fault as being present anymore. In this case with the Avensis sounds like it may be the SCV issue? Have a look at http://toyotaownersclub.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=87986 and see if it helps.
  12. D4d Obdii

    Yeah I read Ruperts post and I am just looking into buying the parts now. Thanks for your help. Anchorman, do you have the same info for the turbo fault code that FielderMike is seeing as you provided for me for the P0627 fault on the SCV vales? If we can see the wording that Toyota give the fault code it may well give us more insight into how one may cause the other. Sounds likely that it might though as the P0627 SCV code refers to actual fuel pressure being lower than target (due to the fuel not getting through because of the faulty SCV), in this situation the boost pressure will also be lower than target for the same reason and so may flag a turbo fault code.
  13. Newbie Question

    This is quite a good link. A bit (ok, a lot) American but it gives you the idea between the first generation (4.1), second generation (4.2) and third generation (yep, you've guessed it - 4.3): Wikipedia RAV-4
  14. 4.2 D4d Scv Valve Replacement

    4.2 RAV4 D4-D SCV Valves: Ok, here goes with the details I know about the SCV valves and their replacement on the 4.2 RAV4 D4-D. Or at least this is how I did it, maybe not the best way but it worked for me! I have yet to look on the official Toyota technical website to see if there are any better instructions in their service manual. Background: The symptoms were fairly similar to others who have posted on the forum, ie: loss of power, especially at the top end of the rev range above 3000rpm. Sometimes it would be fairly intermittent and at others the RAV could not get out of its own way!! There was no MIL to start with but that soon changed..... It would come on and off but then it came on and stayed on. The DTC stored was P0627 relating mainly (as it says there could be something else causing the problem) to the SCV valves as below: I also checked the electrical side of the valves, but mine were both in spec. You can check for continuity between the valves and the engine block and resistance across the valves themselves: And if required the following shows the wiring between the SCV valves and the Engine ECU: New valves were purchased from Kingo [aka Parts-King on the Forum] for £194.16 inc. VAT & p&p. Part # is: 04221-27011 and is described as: "Pump Kit, Supply". Ace service from him! Replacement: Firstly I undid the two nuts holding the coolant tank in place. Then carefully lifted the tank off the studs (and the locating spigot under the tank) and moved it to the left. I managed to fix the right hand hole onto the left hand stud (if that makes sense!) and could then hold it in place with a nut put on finger tight. Just kept it nicely out the way although you could achieve the same thig using a cable tie I guess. Then I removed the air intake pipe running between the front of the intercooler and the throttle body. This is the main, large diameter black pipe in the photo below (the location of the SCV valves is highlighted by the red circle): Once this is done you should have something which looks like this: I also removed the nut holding the wiring loom trunking in place (in the green circle) to gain better access. The red circle is where the SCV valves are. To identify between the two valves, the front one is redish brown and is SCV 1, and the rearmost one is green and is SCV2. I did one valve at a time to ensure I didn't mix them up and started with the rear most one (closest to the engine block) as this is the most difficult to do because of the limited access. Always better to start with the hard one as when you're bored and tired the second one seems easier! After undoing the electrical connectors to each valve I then removed the cap/allen head screws holding the valves themselves in place. I needed to use a small screwdriver between the flange and the fuel pump to carefully prise the valve out of it's housing as it was quite tight. Once removed you can push the new one into place. Due to the limited access I could not push the valve fully home so used the fixing screws by tightening each screw a few turns each, alternating between each one, to make sure that it went in square. The other valve was changed in the same way but was a little easier due to the better access. The following photo shows the new rear (green) valve in place and the old front (red) one removed before fitting the new one: Once both new valves were in place I wiped up as much of the spilt diesel as I could (not much came out when the valves were removed really), just helps to check for leaks if the area you're checking is already dry. Then I replaced all the components I'd taken off. Not sure if it helped but I pressed the priming button on top of the fuel filter head until I felt resistance to make sure the fuel system was full. That's it! The engine started almost immediately and ran fine. On the second ignition cycle the MIL went out and has been out since (keeping my fingers crossed here!). I guess it will be a good idea to get the fault codes cleared at some point as the original DTC will still be present as a historic code. Always good practice to clear the fault codes once you have fixed the problem. The following photo shows the old valves. The new ones didn't look any different to be honest, except cleaner! All in it took about 1hour from start to finish. Hope this helps someone else! :)
  15. Gearbox Oil Change.

    Quick update for regarding the SCV valves- just ordered them from Kingo so will hopefully get them by in time to fit them at the weekend (in the pouring rain no doubt!). Just hope they fix the problem but I think there's a good chance as I had the P0627 DTC. I'll take plenty of photos so it can be added to the 'how to' posts.