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Just wondereing if there were any other members that are into gardening ( this probably won't appeal to many of our younger members LoL , who probably feel its for pensioners and anoraks :lol: )

However its a subject for me that brings enormous pleasure and hours of relaxation plus frustration in equal measure , the possibilities are endless with what you can create and achieve the more you put in the more rewarding the final result .

I got the gardening bug around 20 years ago when i was inspired by a friend of mine who's garden was a sight to behold , a truly magnificent example of beauty and tranquility , gardening at its best ! .

So i'm a little surprised to see that there is no gardening section within the the Hobby Discussions section , maybe there's not enough interest within the club ?? , or is there , i fear its probably the former , and naturally responses , or lack of to this post will prove one way or the other , it will be great if there are others that wish to share experiences , ask questions , problem solving , ect , ect .

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Hi,I am a new member so looking around the club,and I dropped on your posting,I am a keen gardener and have been for years,following my old man who also was a keen gardener,and having recently become an apprentice pensioner,I am pleased to have even more time to spend in the garden,it is also nice to not have to rush the jobs all in the weekend,as its now all a weekend.

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Hi,

as I`m taking early`ish retirement,going to be in the same position as our other poster,apprentice pensioner.So will have more time to get the garden straight & use the greenhouse to its potential.So yes,there are green fingered Toyota drivers out there.

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Gardening is as much a hobby as anything else so why not a 'Gardening Section' huh.gif

It is not my favourite passtime but I would like to get the views of others who know more than I do thumbsup.gif

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Gardening is as much a hobby as anything else so why not a 'Gardening Section' huh.gif

It is not my favourite pastime but I would like to get the views of others who know more than I do thumbsup.gif

That leaves the field open...

Seriously that is a great idea, I love watching the wife garden and I am solely in charge of the veggie patch thumbsup.gif

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:yahoo: :yahoo: Almost a year to the day of my original post and a bit like buses three replies at once :) , but better late than not at all , its great to hear from you guys keep up the posts and maybe some pics , my current garden is a reasonably new project for me although i have been at my current address for 10 years now i only started work on it not quite three years ago as the kids are now growing up and i could remove the large wendy house that took up a large corner and totally dominated , i only have a small garden with an odd shape and am overlooked :( i am now about half way as to what i want to achieve with it and as you can appreciate i don't have a great deal of time to get everything done because my job comes first , anyway to date i have laid a patio built a pergola laid a paved circle in one corner and some decking in the other where i have housed the BBQ , last spring i bought in some top qaulity top soil and leveled the garden as it sloped downwards from front to back then laid a new lawn and started work on my borders i had to bring in more top soil because my agrden is made up totally of heavy clay so i dug the borders out removed the heavy clay placed composted manure in the base and topped it all up with good quality top soil , i'm quite pleased with what i have achieved so far as there was nothing here when i arrived as the house was a new build.

I have one or two problems at the moment and am not sure how to resolve it , firstly i have fire ants in my new lawn , i returned from holiday recently to find my nicely manicured lawn to have around 60 anthills starting to form :censor: and thats no exageration the second is earthworms now that we have had a fair bit of wet weather earth mounds are starting to form also , i know that worms do a good job for the soil and an abundance of earth worms is a good indicator as to the condition of the soil , but the mounds on the lawn are unsightly , however my main objective is to get rid of the ants , at present all i am doing is placing the hose on the anthills as they form and dispersing the soil then i give the area a blast of ant powder which deters the little blighters for a while but does'nt get rid of them altogether , any thoughts ideas would be most welcome .

like i said its only a small garden and its a work in progress

Turkey2010side1.jpgTurkey2010side2.jpg

Turkey2010side4.jpg

Turkey2010side3.jpg

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Bait methods are inexpensive, easy and safe. Baits are made up by three types of ingredients:

The insect control chemical. There are currently seven control chemicals in use for bait. Of these seven, hydramethylnon and spinosad are considered to be relatively slow-acting. Three affect insect growth. These are fenoxycarb, S-methoprene and pyriproxifen. They actually cause the queen to stop laying eggs. Abamectin is also a growth regulator-like substance and, although a bait compound, works best when used as a mound treatment.

The substance that forms the particle for the ants to carry. This is usually made from ground corncobs.

Do not try to save time spreading both bait and lawn fertilizer. The fertilizer only makes the bait less attractive to worker ants and therefore less effective. Application should be at the rate of one to two pounds per acre or 15 to 25 bait particles per square foot. Baits can be broadcast in the spring and fall if the growth regulator type bait is used.

Applications in September and October are especially helpful if you want to avoid springtime fire ants, and farmers often find that this fall application helps to keep hay field free of mounds when mowing hay in the spring.

You should also avoid disturbing mounds when broadcasting. This will cause the foragers to flee back to the mound to protect the queen, and they will usually move the colony rather than carry the food back to the nest.

Some common bait products are: Extinguish Professional Fire Ant Bait; GardenTech Over 'n Out! Fire Ant Killer Mound Treatment; Amdro Ant Block Home Perimeter Ant Bait; Green Light Fire Ant Control with Conserve; Ferti-Lome Come and Get It; Amdro Fire Ant Bait or Amdro Pro; Extinguish Plus Fire Ant Bait; and Spectracide Fire Ant Killer Plus Preventer Bait Once & Done.

Bait treatments are an excellent way to treat entire communities. Baiting can be much more cost effective than other methods, can lower the frequency of applications, and is less toxic to the environment.

One of the common home remedies for fire ants is to use a pot of boiling water on fire ant mounds as you find them in your yard.

This method is at best effective at killing about 60% of the mounds you use it on - there are still going to be ants that survive it.

It is most effective when used right after a rainfall - when it rains, fire ants go into construction mode and will begin building up fresh mounds.

That means a lot of them are near the surface and vulnerable to the scalding water. Also, because rain can turn the tunnels to mud, it makes it harder for tthe ants to just move deeper into the mound to avoid being scorched, and stops them from up and moving to another location.

Boiling Water

The process is pretty easy. First, boil a pot of water - at a minimum you are going to need two or three gallons per mound. Make a hole in the top of the mound (to allow the water to go in deeper). Then just pour it directly into the hole - you'll kill a large number of fire ants that way. The only problem - you need to kill the queen in order to actually get rid of the colony itself. If she survives the water, all you've done is damaged them - and they might just pull up stake and move to another part of your yard. However, you can easily pour water on any other mounds that show up.

There are a couple of drawbacks, however. First, it can make the soil sterile in some cases - so it's a bad idea for most people, who will want grass to grow back where the fire ants were living.

Second, it will kill all vegetation in the area that the boiling water was poured - meaning you can end up with a big brown spot on your lawn. This treatment is not a good idea unless the part of your property with fire ants isn't a traditional yard with grass.

Finally, if you do this, BE VERY CAREFUL.

Carrying around pots of boiling water can be dangerous if you spill any on yourself. Try lugging around the pot full of water before you boil it - so you make sure it's not too heavy when it's actually dangerous.

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nice one Raist :thumbsup: see you can be serious when you want :lol: seriously though :P i do appreciate your post , the boiling water method is a no no because it will kill the lawn as well as the ants , however the other method seems the way to go , i,ve not seen the type of bait that you spread for sale in B&Q etc or maybe i have'nt looked hard enough , i have recently purchased a few bait stations though , but these are the ones that are intended for indoor use , so i'll have to wait for continued dry weather before trying to use them , sods law would have it that it has'nt stopped raining since getting back from holiday .

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Ssh, You will ruin my reputation tongue.gif

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I've had an allotment for about 7 years now, into gardening from a point of growing own fruit and veg etc, beyond a few sun flowers to attract bees I stick to the veg. Had a greenhouse at home for over 20 years, where I grow tomatoes and chillies every year, you cant beat a home grown tomato for taste.!

Regards Austin..

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I can dig that... :thumbsup:

:rolleyes: For forks sake :help:

Will you please stop shovelling the feeder lines in his direction :help:

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:yahoo: :yahoo: Almost a year to the day of my original post and a bit like buses three replies at once :) , but better late than not at all , its great to hear from you guys keep up the posts and maybe some pics , my current garden is a reasonably new project for me although i have been at my current address for 10 years now i only started work on it not quite three years ago as the kids are now growing up and i could remove the large wendy house that took up a large corner and totally dominated , i only have a small garden with an odd shape and am overlooked :( i am now about half way as to what i want to achieve with it and as you can appreciate i don't have a great deal of time to get everything done because my job comes first , anyway to date i have laid a patio built a pergola laid a paved circle in one corner and some decking in the other where i have housed the BBQ , last spring i bought in some top qaulity top soil and leveled the garden as it sloped downwards from front to back then laid a new lawn and started work on my borders i had to bring in more top soil because my agrden is made up totally of heavy clay so i dug the borders out removed the heavy clay placed composted manure in the base and topped it all up with good quality top soil , i'm quite pleased with what i have achieved so far as there was nothing here when i arrived as the house was a new build.

I have one or two problems at the moment and am not sure how to resolve it , firstly i have fire ants in my new lawn , i returned from holiday recently to find my nicely manicured lawn to have around 60 anthills starting to form :censor: and thats no exageration the second is earthworms now that we have had a fair bit of wet weather earth mounds are starting to form also , i know that worms do a good job for the soil and an abundance of earth worms is a good indicator as to the condition of the soil , but the mounds on the lawn are unsightly , however my main objective is to get rid of the ants , at present all i am doing is placing the hose on the anthills as they form and dispersing the soil then i give the area a blast of ant powder which deters the little blighters for a while but does'nt get rid of them altogether , any thoughts ideas would be most welcome .

like i said its only a small garden and its a work in progress

Turkey2010side1.jpgTurkey2010side2.jpg

Turkey2010side4.jpg

Turkey2010side3.jpg

That's a lovely garden.You must be very pleased and proud with what you have done so far :clap::thumbsup:

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I've had an allotment for about 7 years now, into gardening from a point of growing own fruit and veg etc, you cant beat a home grown tomato for taste.!

Regards Austin..

Could'nt agree more , i got a bit carried away the summer before last , i bought some tomato's from tesco's that were really sweet and juicy , i squeezed the seeds out of a couple , dried them on a piece of kitchen roll on the kitchen window for a week then planted them up in a couple of seedling trays , i had around 40 seedlings come up , i gave some away to the neighbours and planted the rest out approx 25 plants , i had more tomato's through the summer than you could poke a stick at , they were even tastier than the ones i took the seeds from but there were so many tomato's far more than my family could get through each week that i ended up giving them away to my neighbours, family and friends .

This summer i only planted around 10 plants , plus 2 runner bean pyramids , had a good crop from both but best of all after a disappointing return last summer i had a great crop of grapes this year from my vine which has been in around 3 years now, i also planted up some strawberries in pots , beware if you plant strawberries out in your borders as they will take over if left unchecked, they throw out so many shoots that form roots in turn forming another plant and so on .

Gwapple me gwape nuts av a look at these :D

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That's a lovely garden.You must be very pleased and proud with what you have done so far :clap::thumbsup:

Thanks for the compliment :thumbsup: everything in the photo's was done my me , patio , pergola , decking , the lot :D

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Cracking Grapes, I don't think they will grow outside where I live in the NW, the only vines I've seen up here are perminant residents in a green house.

Have a look on utube, search for "upside down tomato planter" they would hang nicely from your pagoda beam ends..

Regards Austin..

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Thanks for the compliment :thumbsup: everything in the photo's was done my me , patio , pergola , decking , the lot :D

Well it beats working... :D

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Thanks for the compliment :thumbsup: everything in the photo's was done my me , patio , pergola , decking , the lot :D

Well it beats working... :D

I found the grapes quite pressing , i was out on my feet :D

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I'm quite partial to a bit of gardening, when I have the time at least. Last year I must've grown on about 300 plants from seed mainly for window boxes. hanging baskets and tubs. Wed don't really have a garden or anything like that mainly because my back garden is actually a small forest and at the front of my house well... It's more a mixture of tarmac, another foresty type bit and a sort of um, flat bit. O_o

Either way it's all a mess and me dad won't do anything about it because it'd be for me and me mam and he begrudges that, plus he'd rather live in a **** hole. Me mam an I though are too busy with work most of the time to even think about tidying everything up and sorting it out. I only ever managed to do the seeds last year bgecause I made meself have a few weeks of Sunday's off to actually do it. :unsure:

I haven't done any at all this year. We even got a bucketload of bulbs to plant months and months ago but we didn't have the time to do it. So long as me Bleeding Heart Plant comes out again this year like it did last, I'll be happy. ^_^

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Hi I just joined the Toyota club a few days ago,although I have browsed it before. I would be into a bit of gardening myself, I'm far from being a pensioner by the way. I've been into gardening since my late teens,thanks to my aunt. Your garden is lovely. Question for you about tomato plants, I have them in the conservatory as I am in a cooler part of the country and they never do well outside, so I'm trying them outside this year for a change, in case of another bad summer. They were outside last year and didn't get pollinated. The ones I have now are a good size, so do I need to put them in bigger pots or can I keep them in the smaller pots? I'm planning on putting them out on good days and bringing them in again on bad days.

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Hi Lorna, welcome to the club.

Regards tomato plants, i've always grown mine outside in the ground and occasionally in pots as well, i always find though, that the ones in the ground do much better than the ones in pots, basically i prepare the soil beforehand by turning the soil over and adding composted farmyard manure, then i just throw the seeds in and let the plants come up on their own, when they are about a foot tall i thin them out and push in bamboo sticks to train them against, then when the plants have grown to around 4ft to 5ft tall i pinch out the growing tips, i feed them whilst they are growing with liquid tomato feed, its also important to never let the plants dry out, so keep them well watered.

Regards your plants, i would keep them in the biggest pots you have, keep them well watered (but not over watered, you have to get the balance right) feed them at regular intervals and keep them in a nice sunny spot and they should do well.

if you look through the posts on here you will see a post from "roadwrangler" where he suggests growing tomato plants from a "upside down tomato planter" i've not tried them yet myself but i'm told they work really well.

good luck with it all :thumbsup:

PS

i forgot to mention that you can self pollinate your tomato plants if pollination is a problem, here's how http://www.ehow.com/video_7502599_do-self_pollinate-tomato-plants_.html

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Thanks for all the tips. I'm not greenfingered enough to use any farmyard manure, although I did feed the lawn with something from b&q containing chicken poo pellets.I might risk putting one of the plants outside and leave the other 2 indoors. One of the plants outside last year was a big leafy one, flowered but no pollination, even though it was beside lavenders full of bees. I might even risk putting 2 out and keeping one plant in. If the bees don't pollinate them this year I can have a go at doing it myself.

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Thanks for all the tips. I'm not greenfingered enough to use any farmyard manure, although I did feed the lawn with something from b&q containing chicken poo pellets.I might risk putting one of the plants outside and leave the other 2 indoors. One of the plants outside last year was a big leafy one, flowered but no pollination, even though it was beside lavenders full of bees. I might even risk putting 2 out and keeping one plant in. If the bees don't pollinate them this year I can have a go at doing it myself.

Why wait, to pollinate them yourself simply arm yourself with a tiny brush, something like an artists brush and brush the petal part of the flower from one onto the center part of another flower and so on, regards the manure, its composted so you need have no fears about handling it, it does'nt stink lol, its not much different from handling ordinary compost, if you have a farm nearby that would be ideal, if not you can buy it in bags from B&Q, trust me your plants will love you for it, you can't beat natural organic matter for growing your plants in, if you turn your borders over in early spring and mix in good composted farmyard manure in preperation for your vegetables, bedding plants etc you'll be amazed at the size and quality of your plants when they mature.

Regards your lawn, was the product you treated it with intended for lawns ?, either way i've been using evergreen to treat my lawn for years and up untill now i've sworn by it, it used to be called evergreen extra then i think evergreen extra complete, and now evergreen 4 in 1, the product of the previous years would initially scorch the lawn a little but after a fortnight you would have a lovely lush green lawn, this year however i notice thay have changed the product as its different in texture and has some added tiny little blue pellets, after applying the new product i noticed that the lawn did not show any scorching as in the past but neither did it green up anywhere like it used too, and last week i treated it again but it still has'nt greened up like before, looks like i'll be changing brands after the best part of 20 years using evergreen, why do manufacturers always have to go and change a winning product for something inferior :ffs: .

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