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Mystery Gunk :unsure:


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Thanks for all your responses. I still find it disappointing that small cars which are designed for short journeys seem to gum up if they're used for that purpose. I'll do as recommended and talk t

I'm obviously not saying that Toyota or any other manufacturer cannot design a solution to this - but the vast majority of motorists wouldn't need this solution, nor the added expense to the purchase

Just checked my daughters 10 plate 30k miles as she just home from work 5 mins up road and hers was all gunked up also. Engine wasn't even hot but rocker cover is plastic so whether this is some reaso

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Hi all,

I removed my oil filler cap and discovered this "Gunk" inside the cap! Has anyone else has/had the same?? As i've never noticed this before! I've added some pics to show you!!

post-63295-126867665905_thumb.jpg

post-63295-126867667582_thumb.jpg

post-63295-126867669241_thumb.jpg

Many Thanks! :thumbsup:

That would appear to be an emulsion of Oil and water, caused by either condensation from doing many very short journeys or by a failed head gasket.

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Hi all,

I removed my oil filler cap and discovered this "Gunk" inside the cap! Has anyone else has/had the same?? As i've never noticed this before! I've added some pics to show you!!

post-63295-126867665905_thumb.jpg

post-63295-126867667582_thumb.jpg

post-63295-126867669241_thumb.jpg

Many Thanks! :thumbsup:

Mine is exactly the same.

MrT cleaned it out of the Oil filler cap at the first service and we agreed it would be because I do a lot of short runs.

The Scangauge I use shows it takes some distance for the temperature of the coolant to reach 85 degrees and there it stays, until you switch off and then it rapidly cools off.

I tried blanking off the lower part of the front "grille" to make it warm up quicker but that is really down to the engine design and the thermostat.

The radiator doesn't have an effect until the thermostat opens, and blanking off the lower part didn't affect the running temperature of the engine.

I only took the Oil filler cap off to see how tight it was, just before the car went in for it's service.It has never used any Oil, nor did my Aygo, so I had no reason to take their caps off to top up the Oil.I expect plenty of cars these days, including my old Aygo, have the same mayonnaise but nobody knows (except the service technicians who service the car) as they don't take the cap off to look, as they don't have to.

It is a very common occurence in cars that are not used for longish trips and all my cars for the last 30 years have exhibited the same symptoms to a greater or lesser extent.It is just the sort of trips I do.

It obviously can be due to blown head gasket, but I doubt it as the engine is running fine with no coolant loss.

Think I'll have to go for some longer runs!

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OMG :eek: I can't belive what i'm seeing here, if you saw that on a used car you wouldn't buy it because you would suspect the head had gone. Get Mr T to clean it :) and keep an Oil on the coolant.

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Definately a case of too many short commuter journeys. How many miles has your IQ done?

Seeing as the IQ was designed for this type of inner city driving, this much condesation is a bit of a concern. A high moisture content in the Oil can cause engine wear, as it turns the Oil acidic. As the service schedules are based on conbined driving use, I would be inclined to change the Oil at half the recommended interval to prevent excessive moisture build up.

It will probably stabilize during the summer months due to a warmer ambient temperature, but I would take your car for a decent trip: 100 miles or so, on a mixture of roads including motrways, and then change the Oil.

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  • 4 years later...

Phew!! I just checked my Oil filler cap and couldn't believe the mayo underneath. At first you think head gasket, it's true.

On mine there's a ton of Mayo in the filler neck, the dipstick looks normal apart from a touch of what I think is the same mayo on the tip.

What do you folks recommend?

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My IQ has been sitting today for two hours after a 6 mile run.

I have just checked my Oil filler cap, its as clean as a whistle no gunge / mayo at all inside the spout or under the cap all very clean ! Just a little clean Oil to be seen.

miles are 40,000 and was serviced by Toyota over 14 months ago just before I bought it,

Color of the Oil is only "slightly darker" than it was 12 months ago when Oil was new.

I do short runs between 6 and 15 miles on mostly B roads.

So its due for a service now which I will do myself when the weather improves a bit.

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I would recommend changing the Oil and doing a engine flush, despite some people saying a engine flush isn't required for a car like this. I had this problem due to short runs a few years ago and done a major service and cleaned everything out, never had it since. I'm using 5W 30 fully synthetic Oil and always have since doing my own services with this car. I bought it on 11,000 and now it's on 27,000. It might not work but certainly worked for me. But in general as others have mentioned - short runs are the main cause of this custard-like foam around the engine Oil cap.

Also I'm not sure how you drive but I usually give the car a blast through back roads once every few months just to clean any blockages out and to hopefully prevent this from happening, as I usually drive like a granny to achieve the highest mpg I possibly can. Always worth a go.. :)

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Hi,

Id not do an engine flush as this isnt necessary, but i would suggest either going for a good 15 miles plus journey before immediately changing the Oil or revving the car safely (up to 3000 rpm for the first 5 mins) for 10 mins to get the Oil nice and hot. Then drain and id either use 5W30 Toyota Oil or (controversially) 0W20 Toyota Oil, which iv used on 1 litre engines as well as hybrids in my time, which is thinner so should help reduce your coagulation due to your short journeys. Another good make of Oil is Granvilles if not as it it is cheaper but rather effective.

Hope iv helped.

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Thanks for the comments guys.

I'm already using 0-20 fully synthetic Oil. changed the Oil early at 5k from new, and now she's done only 11.3k. So I've taken all precautions.

Will put some miles on the next few days, as suggested and see if that helps.

Have cleaned the gunk away, so can see if it returns

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If an old man may enter here,many years ago this was this problem with what was then Austin and Morris cars.

It was condensation forming on the rocker cover which the Oil then mixed with.

These were bow to stern mounted engines and some relief was gained by fixing a plate in front of the cover that acted as a baffle against the cold air that was blowing over it.

Maybe some sort insulation on the rocker cover top could help slow this down. ??

Del

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Yep, I've noticed this recently in our 1.0L manual. It was when I poured the treatment into the engine. I wiped it out with a piece of kitchen towel and am keeping an eye on it. The same day we did a run to the beach at Barmouth, about 60+ miles over hills and mountains. Last time I looked at the Oil filler cap it was clean of gunge. Must have been some shorter journeys.

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Today I had some little work on the car...so I opened the oilthingie...

And there is some 'gunk' stuff...

I do drive a lot of short distances... so the engine does not get warm enough ...

image_zps6044690e.jpg

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As mentioned,yes short trips will do it. the Oil and water will warm up in the engine enough for heat to rise inside and when it reaches the cold surface at the top condensation will form.The Oil mist that is created by the valve mechanism then mixes with it.

If you wipe out where the Oil filler cap sits and then pour some warm water in the cap it'self that will clean it out. As the weather is now warmer this condition should go away

Del

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Peter

It looks awful!! I suggest you buy a new car

David

How about the all new Toyota Aygo - no mystery gunk, cheaper, more doors, and pulling-capability...

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Reading this post it appears some people think that have this gunk that it is only in the filler cap, nooooooo all the top of the engine is coated in it, all over the head bolts and bit by bit it will coat many surfaces. This is caused by short trips and the Oil not getting warm enough to dry out the internal condensation within the engine. It will block up breather pipes and eventually wreck the engine. Eventually this emulsified Oil is what will attempt to lubricate your engine but it will just seize up. I see some people say use an engine flush and some don't as apparently it's useless, you need to use engine flush to break up this sludge, run the engine for a while as per instructions on the can, do an Oil and filter change and hope you have got it all out, just wiping it from the cap is only removing a small amount of this gunk. I even know mechanics that would drain the Oil and refill it with diesel and run it for a short while to wash out the sludge, unless you know what you are doing i would not recommend doing this. I suggest you do an Oil and filter change using an engine flush and keep an eye on it and be prepared to do it again in say 500-1000 miles, expensive maybe but a lot cheaper than a new engine, or, as David said, get another car and cut your losses whilst it is still running.

Regards Mike169

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Thanks everyone...

And NOPE ... not going to change this car for any other one... If the 5 year warranty runs out, I will have it serviced by my Smart-Specialist...very capable for this car. And I hope to run it, till its at the end of it's life (heard some disturbing things about CVT's wearing down and having to be replaced $$$ ).... And I am not really concerned of this gunk stuff ....

The smaller engine of our Smart runs even smaller miles and has only 600CC and very little Oil in it... totally no problemo what so ever... It is well serviced btw... :-)

The idea of the Aygo was one I suggested for my wife (instead of her Verso)... Halas the Aygo in Holland comes only in the 1 liter version... and the Peugeot 108 and Citroen C1 also come with 1.2 liter engines... So mayby a change of brand? (hmm do not think so..not to Peugeot or Citroen anyway)... Maybe then the new Mitsubishi Colt...

And yes..it has to pull... "trailer with motorcycle"

Reading this last post...I have to mention that "incidentally" my iQ is due for a "big service" in the second half of April.

So all Oil and filters and stuff will be changed... I think it has 42.000 kilometers on the clock now... about 26.250 Miles...

And yes ... ( I was going to say something about 'wife' and 'pulling' ) but you get the idea... *smirc* :-P

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I think it is crazy Toyota don't do the 1.2 litre engine, i believe it's the same here in the UK.........have you looked to see if they do a diesel version?

Mike

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Reading this post it appears some people think that have this gunk that it is only in the filler cap, nooooooo all the top of the engine is coated in it, all over the head bolts and bit by bit it will coat many surfaces. This is caused by short trips and the oil not getting warm enough to dry out the internal condensation within the engine. It will block up breather pipes and eventually wreck the engine. Eventually this emulsified oil is what will attempt to lubricate your engine but it will just seize up. I see some people say use an engine flush and some don't as apparently it's useless, you need to use engine flush to break up this sludge, run the engine for a while as per instructions on the can, do an oil and filter change and hope you have got it all out, just wiping it from the cap is only removing a small amount of this gunk. I even know mechanics that would drain the oil and refill it with diesel and run it for a short while to wash out the sludge, unless you know what you are doing i would not recommend doing this. I suggest you do an oil and filter change using an engine flush and keep an eye on it and be prepared to do it again in say 500-1000 miles, expensive maybe but a lot cheaper than a new engine, or, as David said, get another car and cut your losses whilst it is still running.

Regards Mike169

Blimey Mike, matie, are you on commission from the cardiologist fraternity

I have worked on engines where you could not see inside the top end of the for the emulsification that have been successfully put back on the tarmac with no ill effects after a bit of TLC

Del

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Hi Derek, matey, lol, most engines can be cleaned out one way or another and as i sure you know just by taking the lid off can cure most of the problem but on here it's not knowing each persons ability to part strip an engine and put it back together again. My reference about the breather hoses was back in the old days when we were both a bit younger, lol, i remember working on an A+ series 1000cc Metro that had running problems that basically had blocked breather pipes so i was trying to get across worst case scenario on how things can end up. Of course more regular Oil changes will help the washing out of the gunk but a good run on a regular basis will do much the same......................yikes i feel even older now!

Mike.

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I think it is crazy Toyota don't do the 1.2 litre engine, i believe it's the same here in the UK.........have you looked to see if they do a diesel version?

Mike

Probably the reason behind Toyota not using the 1.2 3 cylinder engine is that it is a PSA unit. PSA supposedly have a new range of 3 cylinder 1.0 litre and 1.2 litre engines, which they also use in the 208.

Toyota have updated their 1.0 litre to produce slightly more power and torque, and also reduce the CO2 emissions - and I would expect this updated engine will appear in the Yaris for its mid-life facelift later this year.

As to whether the C1 and the 108 will use the 1.0 litre Toyota unit or the 1.0 litre PSA unit is something we'll find out when the car goes on sale.

When the diesel versions of the first generation Aygo were imported into the UK, they didn't prove to be much more economical than the petrol versions. Diesel fuel is more expensive in the UK and diesel versions were dropped from the UK market due to low sales volumes. The viability of diesel versions may be different in some European countries, where the cost of diesel is less than petrol.

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