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Dpf Regeneration Cycle

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Avensis D4-D T180:- Any ideas how to force the car into a regeneration cycle ?

I cannot honestly say I`ve ever seen it happen (smoke from tailpipe or under bonnet) or smelt it happening (burning soot smell in the past 18 months.

When is it supposed to occur and can anyone tell me your experience of a regeneration cycle ?

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Avensis D4-D T180:- Any ideas how to force the car into a regeneration cycle ?

A forced regen can only be started by a computer connected to your ECU.

Why do you want to, is the car not running ok ?

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Having recently cleaned the EGV valve assembly, I`d would like to ensure it stays clean for longer and would simply like the option of being able to some how force it into a cleaning cycle even though I know there would be a fuel economy impact.

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Having recently cleaned the EGV valve assembly, I`d would like to ensure it stays clean for longer and would simply like the option of being able to some how force it into a cleaning cycle

The regeneration process only burns the accumulated soot out of the DPF, unnecessary regens wouldn`t achieve anything.

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This is what the AA say about regen cycles...

Passive regeneration

Passive regeneration takes place automatically on motorway-type runs when the exhaust temperature is high. Many cars don't get this sort of use though so manufacturers have to design-in 'active' regeneration where the engine management computer (ECU) takes control of the process.

Active regeneration

When the soot loading in the filter reaches a set limit (about 45%) the ECU can make small adjustments to the fuel injection timing to increase the exhaust temperature and initiate regeneration. If the journey's a bit stop/start the regeneration may not complete and the warning light will illuminate to show that the DPF is partially blocked.

It should be possible to start a complete regeneration and clear the warning light simply by driving for 10 minutes or so at speeds greater than 40mph.

If you ignore the light and keep driving in a relatively slow, stop/start pattern soot loading will continue to build up until around 75% when you can expect to see other dashboard warning lights illuminate too. At this point driving at speed alone will not be sufficient and the car will have to go to a dealer for regeneration.

Source http://www.theaa.com/motoring_advice/fuels-and-environment/diesel-particulate-filters.html

I am sure I have read somewhere that a minimum of 10 minutes at 60mph + will get the exhaust hot enough for a passive regen.

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