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CorollaD4D

Dual Mass Or Singly Mass Flywheel

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right so i have the 2.0D4D and the clutch and flywheel need replacing. now being in the motor trade if i can call it that i have contacts with a few local parts shops who have quoted me £330 for a german manufacturer clutch kit with single mass flywheel or £430 for a LUK clutch kit and dual mass flywheel. the car comes with a dual mass flywheel from factory.

i have no understanding on what the significance is of the dual mass/single mass flywheel other than i know from experience 1: the single mass flywheel lasts much longer than the dual mass and 2: putting a single mass flywheel in a car which came with a dual mass flywheel originally makes no difference to the performance engine etc (in my experience as far as i know)

my question is what is the difference between the single/dual mass flywheels and is there any reason which i am not aware of which i should not go for the cheaper single mass flywheel?

times are hard and being a student also i am finding it hard to justify buying parts for £430 where i can buy the £330 kit and have it fitted for £430 which is just the cost of supplying the parts on the other kit.

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There was a semi-flamewar about this between HEMI and someone (Anch I think? :lol:) some time back. I'm too lazy to do a search :P but it might be worth reading (If you aren't in a hurry!)

They were talking about RAVs tho'; I think in a Corolla (More the 2.0 than the 1.4) that going solid might feel a lot more vibration during idle unless you get a heftier solid flywheel.

The whole point of a dual-mass flywheel is to get the same effect as a solid flywheel, but with much less weight and better response.

It's a very clever idea, but is sadly held back somewhat by Reality.

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DMF's are fitted for a reason, to reduce and dampen the effects of vibration throughout the lump of a diesel engine. Now it could be argued that it is not necessary, but manufacturers dont spend a chunk of money in R&D to go on and fit a DMF if its not needed. There have been a few people on here that have fitted solid flywheels, but the long term effects on the vehicle are an unknown quantity, so you pays yer money......................

Kingo :thumbsup:

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righteo, thanks for the efficient and simple replies.

i dont mind the extra vibration at idle myself from a passenger comfort point of view, but are there any adverse effects on the engine? in my experience there are none but my experience is only 2nd hand reports from clients who have used my courtesy cars and not from my own personal experience.

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Well it's a million dollar question. The whole reason for DMF is to dampen the engine vibration, not only for passenger comfort but for engine longevity, thats why they are fitted. Your car might live happily ever after if you fit a solid fllywheel but if it didnt then the extra £100 it's going to cost you will seem like chicken feed!

Kingo :thumbsup:

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Well it's a million dollar question. The whole reason for DMF is to dampen the engine vibration, not only for passenger comfort but for engine longevity, thats why they are fitted. Your car might live happily ever after if you fit a solid fllywheel but if it didnt then the extra £100 it's going to cost you will seem like chicken feed!

Kingo :thumbsup:

hi

i beleave ford on some of their smaller diesels are going to or maybe have done away with the DMF and have modified their ecu to reduce toque in the lower gears,so reduce the requirement for a DMF.

there is a third opotion of a flywheel type,i dont know who does it but its a major clutch maker. if remember correctly its a semi DMF. i will have a search and see if i can find it.

if you google duel mass flywheel the is plenty of explanation there.

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Your car might live happily ever after if you fit a solid fllywheel but if it didnt then the extra £100 it's going to cost you will seem like chicken feed!

Kingo :thumbsup:

yeah, i'm starting to think i might as well Shell out the extra quid and get the dual mass flywheel. hmm decisions decisions...

incidentally Kingo, who makes the OEM clutches for toyota, is it LUK?

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Hey, does the Mk1 Yaris D4D have a DMF?

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Hey, does the Mk1 Yaris D4D have a DMF?

i honestly couldnt say. try the car manual or the dealer however be careful what the dealer tells you. one of my dads friends had a fiat and he was told by the fiat dealer the engine didnt have a timing belt and so didnt need a timing belt change, even though his mechanic assured him it did have a belt and it did need changing. the belt snapped...

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Yep i have seen alot of transits go from having a dual mass to a single mass flywheel.

Most them were done under warrenty, ther are ford parts too.

But i am not too sure about the long term effects.

In my opinion i dont like dmf as generally they are more likely to fail than a single mass flywheel, but that is my opinion.

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Dual Mass Flyweheels (DMF) have their benefits.

1. It will be specifically designed for a particular engine and its transmission. Whereas after market solid units may not be.

2. DMF's allow slower idle speeds plus the car can move from stationary using less rpm and using the benefit of low-end torque especially in diesel engines. This in turn improves fuel economy.

3. DMF's also dramatically reduce vibration between the engine and transmission. This in turn allows smooth take up of power to the gearbox thus reducing chatter in the primay input gears. Additionally auto-boxes just work a lot smoother when enegy is evenly tramsmitted evenly.

4. They definitely reduce engine and transmission noise and extend the life of the clutch and gearbox.

To sum up:-

DMF's reduce transmission gear rattle, making for a more comfortable drive.

Can gear change effort, and wear and tear on the transmission system - thus allows the manufacturers to reduce the weight in these components.

Increase fuel economy as smooth gradual transmission of power reduces the chances of wide throttle openings.

Sadly many just don't seem to made to a good standard to suit the applications in which they are used. If makers could only improve the service life or make them so they can be cheaply reconditioned.

The link below may be worth reading.:)

http://carparts.breakeryard.com/cheapcarspares/Dual-Mass-Flywheels.aspx

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thanks for that James. the sad thing is no manufacturer seems to have it down pat when it comes to making and implementing dual mass units?

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single mass flywheel is that why manufacturers turning back to them ,sometimes good ideas just dont work in the real world

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