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paigerich

Carlube

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Got a 2007 Corolla 2.0D4D with 64k on the clock. I'm about to do an Oil change on it and saw Carlube 5w30 fully synthetic 4 litre £7.50 at tesco. Has anyone ever used it? Can anyone recommend it if not can anyone recommend a good reasonably priced Oil for it. Also what grade do you put into this engine?

Thanks

Richard

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Ive used it in a fair few cars before. Never had a problem with it but on something i want to keep or is low mileage... Id pay the extra £20 for the branded stuff :)

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As said also by Steven, If you want REALLY save money, don't try to save money when buy Oil (engine or gear box)for your car.

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Nice one, thanks guys. Think I'll go for the dearer stuff

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When I adviced you do not try to save money when you buy Oil for your car, I DON'T was saying that necessarily the better solution is to buy it in the dealer.

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My local buyology (like a costco) were selling Castrol semi synthetic Oil for £12 for 5ltrs so i picked up a load :)

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Avoid cheap unbranded Oil like the plague.

Think about it for a minute, this fluid has the task of lubricating every friction surface within the engine.

It has to lubricate the cylinder bores enough to ensure they don't wear out excessively, ruining the piston rings and causing catastrophic piston slap.

It has to lubricate the Valve Stems enough such that the valves don't seize within the guide yet not too much that they become flooded and you burn Oil in the cylinder.

Oil also has to lubricate the small end bearings, big end bearings and main bearings. But when it comes to main/big-end bearings it's not just splash type lubrication like camshaft lobes or con-rods, (and remember the camshafts journals are fed like main bearings) it's force-fed boundary type lubrication. This means the Oil is pressurised and fed through to each and every bearing in the lower end, so that the metal journals of the crank never touch the metal bearings themselves. The Oil has to provide a cradle that reduces friction, wear and draws away heat from the lower end, whilst also coping with immense shock pressures from the action of a solid piston and con-rod travelling at ridiculous speeds, stopping then starting again as it moves within the bore.

Oil will need to act as a secondary cooling system for the engine, drawing heat away from the piston crowns and also generally cooling all bearing surfaces throughout the engine.

It has to do all this whilst only being replaced once in thousands of miles, filtered only partially by the primary sump filter and the Oil filter on the side of the block.

A cheap so called synthetic Oil will more often than not, be terrible. These cheap synthetics are actually chemically constructed on top of a basic chain of mineral/vegetable Oil, which when it comes to the aforementioned shock pressures in the boundary fed bearings will break down momentarily and reform, providing no better lubrication than a proper genuine fully synthetic engine Oil.

The good stuff such as Fuchs Titan or Silkolene Pro S will not break down under the shock pressures as they are genuine fully synthetic engine oils.

If you buy these from Opie Oils at the right time you can get some considerable discounts too. I've been using the Fuchs Titan in my 4A-GE and it's never sounded sweeter - like liquid gold :yes:

KP

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Avoid cheap unbranded oil like the plague.

Think about it for a minute, this fluid has the task of lubricating every friction surface within the engine.

It has to lubricate the cylinder bores enough to ensure they don't wear out excessively, ruining the piston rings and causing catastrophic piston slap.

It has to lubricate the Valve Stems enough such that the valves don't seize within the guide yet not too much that they become flooded and you burn oil in the cylinder.

Oil also has to lubricate the small end bearings, big end bearings and main bearings. But when it comes to main/big-end bearings it's not just splash type lubrication like camshaft lobes or con-rods, (and remember the camshafts journals are fed like main bearings) it's force-fed boundary type lubrication. This means the oil is pressurised and fed through to each and every bearing in the lower end, so that the metal journals of the crank never touch the metal bearings themselves. The oil has to provide a cradle that reduces friction, wear and draws away heat from the lower end, whilst also coping with immense shock pressures from the action of a solid piston and con-rod travelling at ridiculous speeds, stopping then starting again as it moves within the bore.

Oil will need to act as a secondary cooling system for the engine, drawing heat away from the piston crowns and also generally cooling all bearing surfaces throughout the engine.

It has to do all this whilst only being replaced once in thousands of miles, filtered only partially by the primary sump filter and the oil filter on the side of the block.

A cheap so called synthetic oil will more often than not, be terrible. These cheap synthetics are actually chemically constructed on top of a basic chain of mineral/vegetable oil, which when it comes to the aforementioned shock pressures in the boundary fed bearings will break down momentarily and reform, providing no better lubrication than a basic mineral oil.

The good stuff such as Fuchs Titan or Silkolene Pro S will not break down under the shock pressures as they are genuine fully synthetic engine oils.

If you buy these from Opie Oils at the right time you can get some considerable discounts too. I've been using the Fuchs Titan in my 4A-GE and it's never sounded sweeter - like liquid gold :yes:

KP

Misposted before and the edit system wasn't working for whatever reason :lol:

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