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Konrad C

Alternator 100 Amp Fuse 1998 T22

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Over the weekend, I accidentally blew the 100 amp alternator fuse whilst changing the coolant.

The engine block drain plug needed a lot of force, so I got the torque wrench to try and free it. In the process the torque wrench touched the alternator creating a big spark, blowing the fuse.

I released the drain plug and a lot of coolant came out (the radiator was already drained).

The first I knew something was wrong was when I tried to lock the car. I found the 100 amp fuse blown, after checking all the fuses. Everything works when the engine is running, but the charge light does not illuminate. From what I have found out, the Battery does not charge.

How is this fuse changed, and can it be obtained separately?

My car is 1998 Avensis and the fuse is located in the engine fuse box mounted next to the Battery.

I have searched the forum, but could not find the info I need.

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The fuse unbolts from UNDER the fusebox, you can buy it seperatly, about £18 ish I think

Kingo :thumbsup:

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Thanks Kingo.

I will look into this. I also will check the alternator and the dome light. The dome light has been playing up and I think that there is a short in that area.

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Quick update. I went to Jemca Sidcup and got a fuse for £11.39 including vat.

Now to fit the thing. I have seen a youtube video on how to change the fuse on Toyota's, so will tackle this on Saturday.

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I fitted the new fusible link. It is an easy but fiddly job.

The engine bay fuse box needs to be unbolted and the casing separated. Then all 10 connectors, the relay block and the fusible link block are removed the below the lower casing. The fusible link block is the last to to be released, due to the tightness of the wiring loom. The using 10 mm socket on one side and 7 mm on the other, the bolts are removed releasing the fusible link.

Refit the replacement and the putting everything back is reversal of the above.

I took some pictures so will post those later.

I found out later that fusible links used in my car are quite common and can be bought anywhere. EuroCarParts charge less than £6 for the same item. I thought that Toyota used a propriety version, so now I know.

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Here are the photos as promised. The pictures show the dismantling and installation as I described in my previous post.

Undo the 2 bolts hold the fuse box housing. Lift away from inner wing. Note the routing of the cables for assembly. The hard bit is splitting the fuse box in half. There are 3 release tabs.

Both the relay block and fusible link holders are released, by using a screwdriver to release the tabs and pushing down through the fuse holder block.

Don't worry about the number of connections - the plugs all have a unique fitting, plus the the cables are fairly stiff.

Once all the connections are undone, the fuse block can be removed.

Then the fusible link can be unbolted and replaced.

Fitting is reverse starting with lining everything and placing the fusible link block first but not clicking it home first. Plug all 10 fuse connectors first starting from the fusible link end first. before the last few connection are plugged home, the relay block should be in place. All connection should click in place.

Finally click the fusible link and relay blocks, the click the 2 halves of the fuse housing.

Place the fuse box back in the location remembering the cables route, then bolt up.

All done.

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Great job Konrad and the info will be invaluable to anyone else tackling this job, well done :thumbsup: .

The only thing I would add is .... always disconnect the Battery negative whilst working in the engine bay.

Regards Pete.

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Great job Konrad and the info will be invaluable to anyone else tackling this job, well done :thumbsup: .

The only thing I would add is .... always disconnect the battery negative whilst working in the engine bay.

Regards Pete.

A very good point which I will heed Pete.

Next year I will tackle the cam belt.

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Great job Konrad and the info will be invaluable to anyone else tackling this job, well done :thumbsup: .

The only thing I would add is .... always disconnect the battery negative whilst working in the engine bay.

Regards Pete.

A very good point which I will heed Pete.

Next year I will tackle the cam belt.

It's a good idea to do the water pump at the same time mate :yes: .

Pete.

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