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thatch

Front Brakes

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Hi all...i have a 2002 avensis d4d. It started making a grinding noise from the front brakes which can only be described as if the pads were worn out completely and rubbing against the disc(steel on steel). But the pads were only half worn so i changed them and the noise disappeared for a few thousand miles and then came back. I put up with it for a wile but it got worse so i changed the front discs and pads and the noise stopped. But once again after about five thousand mils the noise is back. The rear pads have been changed also but it sounds like its coming from the drivers side front. Would there be a problem with the caliper in that when the piston comes out a certain length the noise happens. I checked both front calipers and there are no leaks. The car breaks well enough and i had the break test done and it passed no problem. Its just an annoying noise all the time as i drive the car every day as a taxi! Any help would be greatly Appreciated....

Pat..

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The problem will be the pads/disc. Did you use genuine parts? I've never been happy with Toyota brae components and intend to swap out the front didsc/pads on my 58 plate Avensis. There's plenty of wear left but the brakes groan and grumble as the car draws to a stop.

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The problem will be the pads/disc. Did you use genuine parts? I've never been happy with Toyota brae components and intend to swap out the front didsc/pads on my 58 plate Avensis. There's plenty of wear left but the brakes groan and grumble as the car draws to a stop.

Whilst I agree with the above, did both of you thoroughly clean and wire brush the calipers and make sure the slide pins were free, use coppergrease on the back of the pads and a little bit where the pads sit in the caliper just keep it off the pad face and disc.

I've always done this and never had any trouble .... just a thought and the coppergrease will come in handy for all sorts of other parts liable to seizing. ;)

Regards Pete.

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Had this problem as well.Best solution is Blueprint discs and Blueprint pads they were the best wearing and the least noisey.My car is also used as a taxi so I find that cheaper discs are more likely to glaze on the surface causing this grinding type noise. Mines used to come to halt with the most awful noise at every traffic light sometime you would think that the front drive shafts were about to separate from the gearbox!! At the moment I am on APEC discs and pads as Blueprint were not available, they seem to be quite good fitted 10000 mls ago and no noise yet. Always good to completely dismantle and copper grease all moving parts including the little spring pad holders on pad holder. Do not of course include the hydraulic piston arrangement in this procedure.

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Thanks for replies. I tried blue print pads and discs and apec but no difference in wear or noise! I always coppergrease the back of the pads but as pete says there i must wire brush and clean the calipers and check the pins. The car has 300k miles on it so its prob due a wee clean. Will report back...thanks Guys

Pat

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Just as a note - brake manufacturers do NOT recommend using copper grease anywhere near brakes components.

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Always considerd greasing wheel nuts/bolts a No No. But when changing rear brake shoes on my daughters Micra i found the wheel bolt threads had been greased. I checked at the local independent garage that had done the last service on the car (and had advised her about the need for the brake shoe change) and was told that it was a requirment according to the Nissan sevice schedule.

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Just as a note - brake manufacturers do NOT recommend using copper grease anywhere near brakes components.

Sorry mate I can't agree with you, it has been and still is used in the trade for years, see below.

Pete.

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I too was of the same opinion for 40 years that copper grease should be used until I emailed two brake component suppliers around 4-5 years ago. The copper grease (anti-seize compound) eats the rubber gaitors on the caliper pistons. If lubrcation is necessary only a special compound should be used. Many people refer to these products as grease when it fact most are anti-seize, anti-corrosion or water displacing compounds which have an entirely different properties to that of grease. When you think of it why do new cars not come with it applied to their braking systems.

Sadly due to a computer crash I lost their replies otherwise I would have posted them up in the forum.

If any other member wishes to contact a brake manufacturer for a definitive answer it may help.

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I too was of the same opinion for 40 years that copper grease should be used until I emailed two brake component suppliers around 4-5 years ago. The copper grease (anti-seize compound) eats the rubber gaitors on the caliper pistons. If lubrcation is necessary only a special compound should be used. Many people refer to these products as grease when it fact most are anti-seize, anti-corrosion or water displacing compounds which have an entirely different properties to that of grease. When you think of it why do new cars not come with it applied to their braking systems.

Sadly due to a computer crash I lost their replies otherwise I would have posted them up in the forum.

If any other member wishes to contact a brake manufacturer for a definitive answer it may help.

Lets just agree to disagree then but in my opinion if you use a very small amount in the right places then none of the copper grease will come into contact with the rubbers or seals.

I have used the stuff for years and cars that have been treated with copper grease for 3 or 4 sets of pads have never shown any sign of problems.

Regards

Pete.

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I would support Pete on this one, each to their own though, I have always used a bit of copper grease on the back of pads during installation on cars and motorbikes, never had any issues as I believed it would eliminate any squeeky noise during use

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I had a rattle at the front which I thought was anti-roll bars, Mr T put grease on my brakes and the rattle stopped

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I would agree that the use of copper grease is widespread and accepted within the motor trade but it would be nice to know what the official Toyota technical Dept., recommend.

I ain't knocking the practice but it would be good to know the official recommendations.

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They used to supply a pack of grease with new pads, they stopped that a few years back

They don't reccomend anything goes on the pad, however, if there is a specific "noise" issue like squeaking, they do a very technical grease to smear on the back of the pad, its very expensive, about £60 a tube but you would do a lot of pads with it

Kingo :thumbsup:

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hi i have just bought a 1998 avensis 2.0 turbo diesel i brought it home and noticed that the front pads needed replacing ive removed the old pads and there is nothing left of them just bare metal, ive had the new pads but im having trouble pushing the piston back to fit the new ones ive been reading up on the internet and some of them push back and some wind back i have spent the last 2 hours trying both methods and i cant get the piston to move at all was wondering if any one has any suggestions?

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They used to supply a pack of grease with new pads, they stopped that a few years back

They don't reccomend anything goes on the pad, however, if there is a specific "noise" issue like squeaking, they do a very technical grease to smear on the back of the pad, its very expensive, about £60 a tube but you would do a lot of pads with it

Kingo :thumbsup:

Many thanks for the official Toyota recommendations - it would seem to correspond to the information distributed by brake component manufacturers.

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hi i have just bought a 1998 avensis 2.0 turbo diesel i brought it home and noticed that the front pads needed replacing ive removed the old pads and there is nothing left of them just bare metal, ive had the new pads but im having trouble pushing the piston back to fit the new ones ive been reading up on the internet and some of them push back and some wind back i have spent the last 2 hours trying both methods and i cant get the piston to move at all was wondering if any one has any suggestions?

The front pads should depress easily although you may have to use something similar to a G-clamp to get them moving. Don't forget to remove the brake master cylinder cap and then open the bleed screw on the caliper you're working at. If the pads have worn right down to the metal then the disc will be damaged and need replaced plus there is the possibility the high temperature from metal to metal contact may have seriously damaged the caliper.

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