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Although both my parents are from Newport in Wales and a grandmother from a village in Ireland called Cappoquin, as i was born in Hampstead in London ive aways considerd myself of being English and proud of it, as anyone should be of their place of birth.

When i was a lot younger news reader on the tv used to speak what was considerd the Queens/Kings English.

I know the English language contains many words of foreign origin,as it has evolved,ie shampoo and bungalow came from India, this i understand.

But what cannot except is what is happened to the pronouncing of these English words.

Foe example, Advertisment,Controversy,Subsidence and many others are spoken with the American

pronunciation these days and i cant remember when i last heard or have seen written the word TWICE, its all two times instead again an American way.

It may be an age thing but it does realy annoy me and when those news readers (not all thank goodness) come out with this i feel like giving them a good kicking. More so when its the BBC news reader who should know better.

I know there may be misspelling of the English language in this posting but its not cos its cool but ignorence on my part.

The wife cant understand why i get upset when watching TV and yell at someone who thinks its fahionable to abuse the English language.

Whats my country coming to.

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Fourgiv mi speeling but tis langage nit a livin entittie thangimabib.

All languages undergo change whether we like it or not - new words are created - words fall into misuse - people speak differently - hey that's life.

Where I live the word fornenst remains in common use yet it's rarely used elsewhere - I think it's all down to the fact we communicate on a global scale.

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As another old git I'm thankful and proud that English, in it's many 'forms' (but largely American these days I'll admit) is the international language and one can travel large tracts of the world and still communicate with the locals. (That sounds terribly empire doesn't it :ermm: ). Misuse of words actually annoys me far more than mispronunciation.

And I'm just thankful I'll be dead before I need to learn Chinese. Nothing against the Chinese and someone's got to put the US in it's place, but I'm complete s***e at languages.

Part of pronunciation becoming odd is actually because of the internet. My daughter occasionally tells us something she's read on a website and we have to correct her pronunciation because when it's a new word she says whatever it is phonetically - of course. With more people communicating via the internet, non-verbally and with people from other countries, languages are in for an interesting few years I think.

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Peter - fear not, you're not the only one that gets annoyed at the English language being abused and contorted.

My usual bugbear is those who say 'semi' in an American tone instead of LGV or artic for a lorry and trailer. The very word 'semi' means part or partly, not 'articulated lorry' - very annoying !

You're also onto something with the prevalence of textspeak these days. Perhaps the lack of practice in spelling words out in full is making the newer generations lazy, thus losing the ability to spell properly.

Another thing I've noticed is that many younger people (particularly teenagers) can't count. Your shopping bill comes to £31.20, so you give the cashier £32.20 expecting a pound change - simple really. Nope, they look at you in total confusion and say you've given too much. So you tell them you already have a pile of change so would just like the pound please. They then have to work out how £32.20 - £31.20 gives a pound change and it takes ages. You think 'for crying out loud' ! Older people tend to work this out immediately and don't even ask .......

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Thanks Paul, starting to think it was just me.

when an American who's name i forget produced the ' American' dictionary it was hailed as a wonderful thing by the America people. not realy though,as it took Samuel Johnson nine years to produce the orignal English one.

All this American author had to do was copy it and alter Spellings and pronunciations so as to be different to the real English version

It never developed, the differences were intended.

But a least they describe their version as being English.

Read somewhere that when America gained independence and they were 'sorting things out' it was a close thing between having German or English as the official language. It seems there were many Germans that settled in the country.

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I could go totally ballistic about American mispronunciation, but being mercifu, I will simply give a few of my pet hates.

Aloominum for Aluminium

Hundi = Hyundai

Kohog = Quahog............Family Guy

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As stated, language changes,without change would we not still be speaking as was the norm in Shakespeare's time?

Del

Not talking about changing language but the use of American pronouciation of words in the English language.which is not norm.

Please reread my first post.

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As stated, language changes,without change would we not still be speaking as was the norm in Shakespeare's time?

Del

Not talking about changing language but the use of American pronouciation of words in the English language.which is not norm.

Please reread my first post.

Accepted your invite to reread your first post and note that you object to ,shall we say,USA speak.

Are we not also,in general,guilty of doing the same thing with regional accents? But that is the norm,thankfully.

My point was if the words are pronounced differently by the majority does that way of speaking not become the norm, and is not that word a corruption ?

So I was trying to,maybe,add a point to the discussion not being anti to it

To try to prove my point on this,one thing that jars with me is the invention of the silent "T" as in say bu'er or ma'er

Del

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Hi Del,see your point. but mine is that the American pronunciations of the words used in the English language, did not say develop, but was intentionaly done with the publishing of the 'American' dictionary.

So as to different for the sake of.

I shall see if i can find the name of who was responsable.

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It was NOAH WEBSTER. his dictionary was first printed in 1828. he thought the English spelling was too complicated, i can understand his opinion.

It seems a another American Dictionary is soon due for publication (one of many since the first) giving regional spellings and pronunciations in America.

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My point in all this is that we are British & (mostly) speak English, not American. Therefore it's my opinion that we shouldn't be copying them in many regards. Being different is what makes each race, creed & culture stand out - I don't particularly want to sound like an American, because I'm not one ! :)

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