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Working For It's Keep. Auris Hybrid Touring

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I thought I would start this topic now that the Auris is working for a living.

My Auris has now completed it's transformation from a normal car to a taxi, It's days of 5000 miles a year are over. The car is a 2014 plate and was acquired a couple of weeks ago with 5000 odd miles on the clock, I have added 1000 since then, not all taxi work but test driving and stuff.

It started it's new job yesterday and has behaved admirably achieving, according to the trip, 62 mpg, mostly town work. I like the vehicle very much, it's easy, it's comfortable for both the passengers and me, the boots big, the stereo isn't to bad, ( I am an audiophile) the sat nav? not quite sure but that's in another thread, It's a relaxing drive once you get the hang of it, I get the feeling many people may not get the hang of it hence the abundance of used hybrids with low mileage for sale.

My intention with this topic is to keep hybrid owners and in particular Auris owners up to date with any issues that may arise during this ones( hopefully) long hard working life, a little like Grumpy did with his Prius.

I would hope that the information conveyed along this journey may help others to buy/or not such a vehicle, and most importantly the reliability of the Auris long term as a work horse.

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Just read this

Nice one, Cliff :thumbsup:

Any updates?

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Seeing as time means money, will you be switching to winter/all season tyres?

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Hi folks. Very quick update. Auris seems fine, now at 7200 miles. average consumption over last 200 miles is at 64 mpg, best 69.5. Apart from the Battery cover coming off under the front of the back seat, nothing to really add. A couple of questions if I may.

10,000 mile service. What do they (Toyota) do, if anything?

I have a new i phone 5 which will have internet and stuff. Is it compatible or is there any problems?

My old phone ( real old) keeps disconnecting from bluetooth each time I get out of the car and is a pain in the neck to establish contact. I leave the car in ready mode most of the time when out of it but only in our safe compound and only for a few minutes. I am hoping the i phone does better?

I may need a cover for the back seat, maybe just for sitting on. Any suggestions and is fitting a nightmare? Like taking the seat out?

The rear vent, nearside under back seat. Does it need any special measures, like vacuum cleaning? I read on here some horror stories about such vents on the Prius.

I have increased the tyre pressure 16 inch Continental (original tyres) to 39psi but may go higher depending on responses

Great car to drive and the passengers love it too. Cheers.

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Good to hear from u again, Cliff

What type of road covered for last 200 miles that u got 64mpg?

I not done anything to my Battery vent apart from a vacuum

Also, why 69 psi?

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" I have increased the tyre pressure 16 inch Continental (original tyres) to 39psi but may go higher depending on responses"

You might want to keep an eye on that - the front tyres (225/45/ 18") on my Avensis are supposed to run at 40 psi but looking at the wear pattern that is obviously too high as I'm ending up with 4-5mm at the sides when the centre is getting down to 2mm so I am going to drop down a few psi. It's all well getting another couple of mpg but if it costs you more in tyre wear than you gain ... :unsure:

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My wife has an Auris Hybrid on 62 plate (old gen), works just fine with her iPhone 5. Syncing was a doddle with Toyota Touch & Go and she hasn't complained once (touch wood). I wouldn't expect yours to be any different.

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Good to hear from u again, Cliff

What type of road covered for last 200 miles that u got 64mpg?

I not done anything to my battery vent apart from a vacuum

Also, why 69 psi?

Hi Wayne.. Regarding what type of roads. All sorts, town, motorway, A roads, B roads, mostly town though. I plan my approaches to hazards very early which is vital when driving any vehicle and really helps with a hybrid, I don't break speed limits if possible, I break early and try not to stop, I pulse and glide when safe to do so, that sort of stuff, I find driving the hybrid quite relaxing, unlike a manual. Just take it easy on the right foot, plan ahead, light braking and see if you can beat me :)

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Good to hear from u again, Cliff

What type of road covered for last 200 miles that u got 64mpg?

I not done anything to my battery vent apart from a vacuum

Also, why 69 psi?

Hi Wayne.. Regarding what type of roads. All sorts, town, motorway, A roads, B roads, mostly town though. I plan my approaches to hazards very early which is vital when driving any vehicle and really helps with a hybrid, I don't break speed limits if possible, I break early and try not to stop, I pulse and glide when safe to do so, that sort of stuff, I find driving the hybrid quite relaxing, unlike a manual. Just take it easy on the right foot, plan ahead, light braking and see if you can beat me :)

I am on my FIRST full tank and driving like Ms Daisy

Then on my 2nd tank I will drive a little more brisk and see what the difference is......

I will see if I can beat u in my first tank :)

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My wife has an Auris Hybrid on 62 plate (old gen), works just fine with her iphone 5. Syncing was a doddle with Toyota Touch & Go and she hasn't complained once (touch wood). I wouldn't expect yours to be any different.

Thank you. When I get it set up I shall report back.

" I have increased the tyre pressure 16 inch continental (original tyres) to 39psi but may go higher depending on responses"

You might want to keep an eye on that - the front tyres (225/45/ 18") on my Avensis are supposed to run at 40 psi but looking at the wear pattern that is obviously too high as I'm ending up with 4-5mm at the sides when the centre is getting down to 2mm so I am going to drop down a few psi. It's all well getting another couple of mpg but if it costs you more in tyre wear than you gain ... :unsure:

I shall certainly take that on board. My mechanic always advised more air than less, reason, the tyre wears better

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Good to hear from u again, Cliff

What type of road covered for last 200 miles that u got 64mpg?

I not done anything to my battery vent apart from a vacuum

Also, why 69 psi?

Hi Wayne.. Regarding what type of roads. All sorts, town, motorway, A roads, B roads, mostly town though. I plan my approaches to hazards very early which is vital when driving any vehicle and really helps with a hybrid, I don't break speed limits if possible, I break early and try not to stop, I pulse and glide when safe to do so, that sort of stuff, I find driving the hybrid quite relaxing, unlike a manual. Just take it easy on the right foot, plan ahead, light braking and see if you can beat me :)

I am on my FIRST full tank and driving like Ms Daisy

Then on my 2nd tank I will drive a little more brisk and see what the difference is......

I will see if I can beat u in my first tank :)

Hi Wayne. I am now at 300 miles and reading, still 64 mpg. Once I get down to just under a 1/4 of a tank I fill up again as I never know where I might go, like Scotland or Heathrow or Wales or anywhere. It's a little difficult in my position to almost run dry just in case. However I am trying to calculate the real mpg with a pals help, but I don't think the computer readouts to far out???

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I shall certainly take that on board. My mechanic always advised more air than less, reason, the tyre wears better

I would suggest that that is not very good advice actually as that would lead to uneven wear across the contact patch of the tyre. Usually the tyre pressure recommended by the OEM keeps the contact patch nice and flat on the road surface which leads to more even wear across the tyre surface... Under-inflate and the shoulders will wear faster and over-inflation will lead to the crown of the tyre wearing quicker than the shoulders...

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I shall certainly take that on board. My mechanic always advised more air than less, reason, the tyre wears better

I would suggest that that is not very good advice actually as that would lead to uneven wear across the contact patch of the tyre. Usually the tyre pressure recommended by the OEM keeps the contact patch nice and flat on the road surface which leads to more even wear across the tyre surface... Under-inflate and the shoulders will wear faster and over-inflation will lead to the crown of the tyre wearing quicker than the shoulders...

I seem to remember on some Prius posts, that some over inflate. However I can see your point, perhaps more will join in the discussion.

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Good to hear from u again, Cliff

What type of road covered for last 200 miles that u got 64mpg?

I not done anything to my battery vent apart from a vacuum

Also, why 69 psi?

Hi Wayne.. Regarding what type of roads. All sorts, town, motorway, A roads, B roads, mostly town though. I plan my approaches to hazards very early which is vital when driving any vehicle and really helps with a hybrid, I don't break speed limits if possible, I break early and try not to stop, I pulse and glide when safe to do so, that sort of stuff, I find driving the hybrid quite relaxing, unlike a manual. Just take it easy on the right foot, plan ahead, light braking and see if you can beat me :)

I am on my FIRST full tank and driving like Ms Daisy

Then on my 2nd tank I will drive a little more brisk and see what the difference is......

I will see if I can beat u in my first tank :)

Hi Wayne. I am now at 300 miles and reading, still 64 mpg. Once I get down to just under a 1/4 of a tank I fill up again as I never know where I might go, like Scotland or Heathrow or Wales or anywhere. It's a little difficult in my position to almost run dry just in case. However I am trying to calculate the real mpg with a pals help, but I don't think the computer readouts to far out???

Yes

Computer readout are not that accurate - but better than nothing

My car s official combined is 70mpg

But honestJohn real mpg site states 57mpg - so I usually believe this figure more than the official mpg.

U done really well!

But your s a mk2 isn't it?

So better mpg than the mk1...

Best I done was on day of buying my car 2 weeks ago -

And mostly motorway I only managed 65mpg (but I did do 70+)

Mostly town and some dual carriageway - best I done is 54mpg.

But I changed to all season tyres last week,

And temp has dropped,

Plus having to switch lights on more and air con to demist....I getting 52.7mpg now :(

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I seem to remember on some Prius posts, that some over inflate. However I can see your point, perhaps more will join in the discussion.

On gen3 prius, the MrT sticker recommends 36psi, but different brands seem to need different psi and it also depends on the air temperature when you pump the tyres up. Higher psi gives better mpg but a bumpier ride.

At the end of the day, you need to keep an eye on the tyre wear and adjust the psi to suit.

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Notching up the PSI up by a few over the normal (Say 2-5 PSI but it does depend on tyre size and profile) is perfectly fine and unlikely to cause uneven wear over the tyre. In my case, it actually corrected an issue with the shoulders of the tyre wearing faster than the centre on my previous tyres!

The increased hardness has upsides and downsides: Good things are reduced rolling resistance, more straight-line braking stability, better cornering stability, reduced mpgs and longer tyre life.

Bad things are increased understeer, reduced ride comfort, reduced traction on loose surfaces.

Note: These effects are relatively small (You won't gain 10mpg by upping your tyre pressures, but nor will you fly off the road on a corner at 20mph! :lol:), and will be more noticeable at higher speeds than low. I suspect most people wouldn't even notice!

The changes also depend on the tyre - For normal tyres it's worth it, IMHO, but for 'real' LRR tyres (Not tyres that mfg's just stick LRR on!) they already act this way so increasing the PSI much more will not really gain you anything.

I've always considered pushing the pressures up a bit to be a poor-man's LRR :lol:

Pushing them up anything more than that and you start getting diminishing returns, and issues like the centre-line starting to bulge out starts to become a problem, as does reduced grip as the hardness starts to change the contact patch.

As long as you don't go mad with it, it's fine.

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Notching up the PSI up by a few over the normal (Say 2-5 PSI but it does depend on tyre size and profile) is perfectly fine and unlikely to cause uneven wear over the tyre. In my case, it actually corrected an issue with the shoulders of the tyre wearing faster than the centre on my previous tyres!

The increased hardness has upsides and downsides: Good things are reduced rolling resistance, more straight-line braking stability, better cornering stability, reduced mpgs and longer tyre life.

Bad things are increased understeer, reduced ride comfort, reduced traction on loose surfaces.

Note: These effects are relatively small (You won't gain 10mpg by upping your tyre pressures, but nor will you fly off the road on a corner at 20mph! :lol:), and will be more noticeable at higher speeds than low. I suspect most people wouldn't even notice!

The changes also depend on the tyre - For normal tyres it's worth it, IMHO, but for 'real' LRR tyres (Not tyres that mfg's just stick LRR on!) they already act this way so increasing the PSI much more will not really gain you anything.

I've always considered pushing the pressures up a bit to be a poor-man's LRR :lol:

Pushing them up anything more than that and you start getting diminishing returns, and issues like the centre-line starting to bulge out starts to become a problem, as does reduced grip as the hardness starts to change the contact patch.

As long as you don't go mad with it, it's fine.

Thanks. I thought as much. I will keep my eye on the tyres. The vehicle seems ok at 39 psi, maybe a slight more bumpy, but not to sure as the car is very light on steering feedback when the tyres at their normal 36 psi anyway.

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Hi. I went to Manchester, Didsbury yesterday with the other half to visit my daughter, luggage, one guitar. 164 mile round trip, steady 60 mph M way, not much traffic. Computer readout was 75 mpg avg at end of journey. Noticed a Nissan Leaf at the M way services plugged in, parked next to it and thought, what an awful looking car and am I glad I don't need to plug mine in. Arrived back, woke up, and now have a cold virus. Nice day out though.

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For information only, some guidance on tyre wear and over/under inflation:

Extract from the RoSPA website -

It is vital that tyre pressures are maintained at the levels recommended by the manufacturer to ensure maximum tyre life, safety, the best ride and handling characteristics.

Over or under-inflating tyres is likely to seriously impair their performance and may prejudice the safe use of the vehicle. Over-inflation increases overall tyre diameter, decreases the amount of tread in contact with the road, decreases sidewall flexibility and affects road-adhesion. Under-inflation decreases overall tyre diameter, increases sidewall flexion, generates higher tyre operating temperatures and difficult vehicle handling characteristics. Running an under-inflated tyre may cause premature tyre failure. Both over and under-inflation adversely affect tyre life.

Extract from the Michelin UK website -

There are three main causes of tyre problems that are avoidable: incorrect inflation pressure, speeding and overloading. Taking precautionary measures to avoid them will ensure safer mobility and longer tyre life. Tyres that are under inflated or over inflated can affect your tyre life, driving comfort, traction and braking. Under inflation generates excessive flexing of the tyre casing, which results in overheating, increase of rolling resistance and premature wear. In extreme cases, under inflation can cause tyre damage. Likewise, over inflation can reduce tyre life, reduce grip and create irregular wear.

Page from the Maxxis UK website - http://www.maxxis.co.uk/know-your-tyres/know-your-car-tyres/tyre-pressure

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For information only, some guidance on tyre wear and over/under inflation:

Extract from the RoSPA website -

It is vital that tyre pressures are maintained at the levels recommended by the manufacturer to ensure maximum tyre life, safety, the best ride and handling characteristics.

Over or under-inflating tyres is likely to seriously impair their performance and may prejudice the safe use of the vehicle. Over-inflation increases overall tyre diameter, decreases the amount of tread in contact with the road, decreases sidewall flexibility and affects road-adhesion. Under-inflation decreases overall tyre diameter, increases sidewall flexion, generates higher tyre operating temperatures and difficult vehicle handling characteristics. Running an under-inflated tyre may cause premature tyre failure. Both over and under-inflation adversely affect tyre life.

Extract from the Michelin UK website -

There are three main causes of tyre problems that are avoidable: incorrect inflation pressure, speeding and overloading. Taking precautionary measures to avoid them will ensure safer mobility and longer tyre life. Tyres that are under inflated or over inflated can affect your tyre life, driving comfort, traction and braking. Under inflation generates excessive flexing of the tyre casing, which results in overheating, increase of rolling resistance and premature wear. In extreme cases, under inflation can cause tyre damage. Likewise, over inflation can reduce tyre life, reduce grip and create irregular wear.

Page from the Maxxis UK website - http://www.maxxis.co.uk/know-your-tyres/know-your-car-tyres/tyre-pressure

Given the information given above, I don't believe that you can definitively say you should inflate your tyres in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. For a start which manufacturer? The vehicle's or the tyre's manufacturer?

I don't know why it is, maybe tyre technology has changed over the last 11 years, but my experience is the correct tyre pressure (that is, neither under inflated nor over inflated) is 3-4 PSI over the placarded pressure. I have arrived at this from observing the wear pattern of the tyre and have observed that, for my vehicle, with the tyres that I have fitted at present, a pressure of 39F/37R is what is required to achieve an even wear across the width of the tyre.

At the placarded pressure (35F/33R), I get a distinct uneven wear, where the outer edges wear more than the centre. Definite indication of under inflation. Along with this I notice a higher rolling resistance, evidenced by lower fuel efficiency or higher consumption, if you like.

So, in conclusion, while the vehicle manufacturer's placard may advise tyre pressures, in my opinion it is a starting point. It is incumbent on every driver to check tyres regularly and adjust tyre pressures accordingly for correct inflation, whatever that might be.

If I were to err in either direction, I would tend to slightly higher, than slightly lower, and I can't stress the word slightly enough.

To grossly over inflate tyres, for whatever reason, is highly irresponsible and outright dangerous.

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For information only, some guidance on tyre wear and over/under inflation:

Extract from the RoSPA website -

It is vital that tyre pressures are maintained at the levels recommended by the manufacturer to ensure maximum tyre life, safety, the best ride and handling characteristics.

Over or under-inflating tyres is likely to seriously impair their performance and may prejudice the safe use of the vehicle. Over-inflation increases overall tyre diameter, decreases the amount of tread in contact with the road, decreases sidewall flexibility and affects road-adhesion. Under-inflation decreases overall tyre diameter, increases sidewall flexion, generates higher tyre operating temperatures and difficult vehicle handling characteristics. Running an under-inflated tyre may cause premature tyre failure. Both over and under-inflation adversely affect tyre life.

Extract from the Michelin UK website -

There are three main causes of tyre problems that are avoidable: incorrect inflation pressure, speeding and overloading. Taking precautionary measures to avoid them will ensure safer mobility and longer tyre life. Tyres that are under inflated or over inflated can affect your tyre life, driving comfort, traction and braking. Under inflation generates excessive flexing of the tyre casing, which results in overheating, increase of rolling resistance and premature wear. In extreme cases, under inflation can cause tyre damage. Likewise, over inflation can reduce tyre life, reduce grip and create irregular wear.

Page from the Maxxis UK website - http://www.maxxis.co.uk/know-your-tyres/know-your-car-tyres/tyre-pressure

Given the information given above, I don't believe that you can definitively say you should inflate your tyres in accordance with the manufacturer's specifications. For a start which manufacturer? The vehicle's or the tyre's manufacturer?

I don't know why it is, maybe tyre technology has changed over the last 11 years, but my experience is the correct tyre pressure (that is, neither under inflated nor over inflated) is 3-4 PSI over the placarded pressure. I have arrived at this from observing the wear pattern of the tyre and have observed that, for my vehicle, with the tyres that I have fitted at present, a pressure of 39F/37R is what is required to achieve an even wear across the width of the tyre.

At the placarded pressure (35F/33R), I get a distinct uneven wear, where the outer edges wear more than the centre. Definite indication of under inflation. Along with this I notice a higher rolling resistance, evidenced by lower fuel efficiency or higher consumption, if you like.

So, in conclusion, while the vehicle manufacturer's placard may advise tyre pressures, in my opinion it is a starting point. It is incumbent on every driver to check tyres regularly and adjust tyre pressures accordingly for correct inflation, whatever that might be.

If I were to err in either direction, I would tend to slightly higher, than slightly lower, and I can't stress the word slightly enough.

To grossly over inflate tyres, for whatever reason, is highly irresponsible and outright dangerous.

I would agree with this and so would many tyre fitters and mechanics I know. Rospa, with whom I have worked with in the past have great knowledge concerning vehicle and driver safety, however Rospa and manufacturers may have some vested interests like other charities may have. My vehicle has 39 psi front and rear, the recommended is 36 psi both front and back, I consider this within reason.We have to remember here, this vehicle is a taxi and as such more people get in the back than a normal everyday school run/supermarket car. In fact most vehicles recommend more air in the back than the front for obvious reasons, my last vehicle having such a recommendation.

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All the advisories from manufacturers etc seem to be based upon the assumption that setting tyre pressures is an exact science, when clearly it is not. As others have already said the placarded pressure is no more than a starting point. The manufacturer is trying to find a pressure that will provide a reasonable average for a wide range of driving styles, road conditions, load and weather variations. Anyone who has driven with tyre pressure indicators in place will confirm that the actual pressure in a tyre when running will differ significantly from the pressure set in the garage with the tyres cold. They will also confirm that the difference is not constant, but will vary in accordance with a range of variables. It is not unknown for each tyre to display a different pressure, though they were all set to the same pressure initially and will return to the same pressure when the journey is over and the tyres have cooled.

What I try to do is find a starting pressure that is right for me, given my driving style, the sort of journeys that I do and the conditions in which I drive. I have found that the best indicator is the way in which the tyres wear. If the outer part of the contact patch wears more than the centre of the patch I raise the pressure a little. If central wear dominates I reduce the pressure a little. When I get an even wear pattern, I know that the starting pressure is about right.

Over many years and with several different cars and tyres I have found that the advised pressure is usually lower than it needs to be for my needs. Your requirements may be different.

All the tyre failure statistics that I have seen indicate very clearly that under inflation is a common cause. So, it does not worry me at all if my tyres are inflated to a pressure a few psi higher than the guide pressure, but I check regularly to ensure that my tyres are not underinflated.

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Quick update. 10,000 mile first service today. No problems whatsoever. Oil and filter change, hybrid Battery check and the rest of it all working 100%. Approx 4500 miles covered over the last 3 months in all sorts of traffic situations. Average consumption ( computer readout) around 63 mpg. Toyota dealer also did a full valet. Total cost for service, zero. I have another free service left. Happy days.

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Quick update. 10,000 mile first service today. No problems whatsoever. Oil and filter change, hybrid battery check and the rest of it all working 100%. Approx 4500 miles covered over the last 3 months in all sorts of traffic situations. Average consumption ( computer readout) around 63 mpg. Toyota dealer also did a full valet. Total cost for service, zero. I have another free service left. Happy days.

Congrats!

Why FREE?

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Quick update. 10,000 mile first service today. No problems whatsoever. Oil and filter change, hybrid battery check and the rest of it all working 100%. Approx 4500 miles covered over the last 3 months in all sorts of traffic situations. Average consumption ( computer readout) around 63 mpg. Toyota dealer also did a full valet. Total cost for service, zero. I have another free service left. Happy days.

Congrats!

Why FREE?

Possibly a deal when buying the car I'm guessing.

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