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SAM LOVERS HER TOYOTAS

How To Change Our Drive Belt

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Hi Guys

okay, we assumed that it would be simple, but we're confused a little, took a peek under the hood of our 2010 2.0 Diesel at the weekend, we could see the belt, but access is really tight, we've been advised to removed the wheel followed by the arch liner to gain better access, which we can understand, but we would like to ask:

1. Is it remotely possible to change over from the engine bay without removing anything?

2. Where exactly is the tensioner bolt? I remember on our old 2006 petrol Corolla, we put a spanner on a tensioner bolt to release the belt, but we cant see anything to the side that we need to be concentrating on!

If only there existed a Haynes manual for these vehicles!!! 

Please help guys and Mr Mechanics out there, thank you.

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Sam, seem that no response yet, but I check the Gates site: http://www.gatesautocat.com/drive/TOYOTA/Avensis-Estate-Wagon/ADT270/1ADFTV/11-08_02-16/102211

I also looked at the Contitech site: http://aam-europe.contitech.de/pages/web-katalog/web-katalog_en.cshtml

It seems that the tensioner is locked by one bolt. image K017PK1870 shows the route  S7082.jpg.5bc120fb5b710f4d328003dc471fcd

T38435.jpg.122227a6ba1c01a191cc0b4de9a9f

The tensioner is used in both the 1AD and 2AD engines, which is used in other Toyota cars:- http://www.gatesautocat.com/article/T38435

May be a search on the procedure may help. 

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I found a video : 

This is the best I could find.

Konrad

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Konrad C...

You are a god send, thank you so much, most helpful, and a true credit to the club.

I have been searching every where, mostly via google, but i cant seem to find much on the T27 models.

All i need to know is where exactly the tensioner is and what bolt needs unlocking, once i know that we're sailing. I assume this bolt may possibly be underneath the idler going via your route image.

I am sure that we complete this job ourselves rather than go to the dealers, who have already quotes 48.00 for the belt and an hours labour...total 120+.

I paid 18.00 for a genuine gates belt! Already a huge saving.

Cheers mate

 

 

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9 minutes ago, SAM LOVERS HER TOYOTAS said:

Konrad C...

You are a god send, thank you so much, most helpful, and a true credit to the club.

I have been searching every where, mostly via google, but i cant seem to find much on the T27 models.

All i need to know is where exactly the tensioner is and what bolt needs unlocking, once i know that we're sailing. I assume this bolt may possibly be underneath the idler going via your route image.

I am sure that we complete this job ourselves rather than go to the dealers, who have already quotes 48.00 for the belt and an hours labour...total 120+.

I paid 18.00 for a genuine gates belt! Already a huge saving.

Cheers mate

 

 

Thanks Sam,

Here is a video which has some useful tips. Don't worry that the engine is petrol.

Every little bit helps.

Konrad

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Konrad...seriously...cheers mate, i will be on these vids tonight, i actually look forward to doing this job, yes im not familiar with diesel engines, and this engine looks complex to me, no space at all, but i and my other half should accomplish it, i admit i feel lazy to take off the wheel and arch liner lol, but hey, my late father was a mechanic of nearly 60 years, its in my blood...i think! bless his resting soul, so i should not be defeated by a belt, im proud to say that i havent paid a mechanic in donkeys years lol, having to pay Toyota in 6 months time for a service is a killer for me just to keep the extended warranty void for the next 2 years, servicing at home is something i always look forward to, but hey ho...such is life.

 

Thanks again mate.

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HI Konrad...

All sorted, we bit the bullet, and went to our mechanic today that we haven't seen in years, at 15.00 labour it wasn't worth the hassle doing it ourselves, admittedly we gave it a go yesterday, without removing the wheel nor arch liners, we could have managed to feed the new belt around every pulley, thanks to my smallish hands, but we couldn't get to the tensioner bolt sadly, its a 22 and our spanner wasn't long enough, and we couldn't find anything for leverage, and gave up!

If its of any help to anybody out there, having the car on a ramp, and dropping the under tray, slackening the tension from underneath, gives one just enough space to do the job, its probably more frustrating putting all the clips back in to hold up the under tray lol.

Thank you again for all your input.

Next stop for us will be the rear brakes pad, which we found out are down to 25%...yikes...simple job...but thinking E>P>B to deal with!!!

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2 hours ago, SAM LOVERS HER TOYOTAS said:

HI Konrad...

All sorted, we bit the bullet, and went to our mechanic today that we haven't seen in years, at 15.00 labour it wasn't worth the hassle doing it ourselves, admittedly we gave it a go yesterday, without removing the wheel nor arch liners, we could have managed to feed the new belt around every pulley, thanks to my smallish hands, but we couldn't get to the tensioner bolt sadly, its a 22 and our spanner wasn't long enough, and we couldn't find anything for leverage, and gave up!

If its of any help to anybody out there, having the car on a ramp, and dropping the under tray, slackening the tension from underneath, gives one just enough space to do the job, its probably more frustrating putting all the clips back in to hold up the under tray lol.

Thank you again for all your input.

Next stop for us will be the rear brakes pad, which we found out are down to 25%...yikes...simple job...but thinking E>P>B to deal with!!!

Sam, I don't blame you taking it to the garage. Also if you are working outside with the current weather (well here in the south east), I would rather work or get a mechanic to do the job.

For the rear brakes you need left and right hand piston windback tool. The job itself is straightforward. Obviously the EPB must be off. I had both discs and pads changed. When it came to resetting the EPB, the pedal was pumped to get the pads back to the discs, then whilst holding the pedal down the EPB was engaged. You get a caution light flash, so repeat the process again a few times. It is best to have the engine running to give more current to the EPB motor. My mechanic did not hold the pedal down the first time, but after I instructed him, the brakes set themselves. No problems since.

 

 

 

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HI Konrad

Thank you for your kind reply.

You know what, I will do the pads myself, you've given me the confidence again to do things, god bless, why pay a mechanic 25.00 labour, I've been getting plain old lazy, it is a simple to do job, rang Toyota this morning, picking my pads up tomorrow, 29.00 to me, I get discounts lol, but hold on, you said that I would need the rewind tool, that's one tool I have never invested in, any particular brand or place you would recommend matey? And is it worth doing the fronts too, he just said that they were fine but no particular indication to % left!

And you know when I come to do the rewinds...do I need to keep an eye on the brake fluid reservoir in the engine bay?

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Quote
On 08/04/2016 at 4:50 PM, SAM LOVERS HER TOYOTAS said:

do I need to keep an eye on the brake fluid reservoir in the engine bay?


Definitely :smile:

 

 

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On 4/8/2016 at 4:50 PM, SAM LOVERS HER TOYOTAS said:

HI Konrad

Thank you for your kind reply.

You know what, I will do the pads myself, you've given me the confidence again to do things, god bless, why pay a mechanic 25.00 labour, I've been getting plain old lazy, it is a simple to do job, rang Toyota this morning, picking my pads up tomorrow, 29.00 to me, I get discounts lol, but hold on, you said that I would need the rewind tool, that's one tool I have never invested in, any particular brand or place you would recommend matey? And is it worth doing the fronts too, he just said that they were fine but no particular indication to % left!

And you know when I come to do the rewinds...do I need to keep an eye on the brake fluid reservoir in the engine bay?

 

On 4/8/2016 at 4:50 PM, SAM LOVERS HER TOYOTAS said:

HI Konrad

Thank you for your kind reply.

You know what, I will do the pads myself, you've given me the confidence again to do things, god bless, why pay a mechanic 25.00 labour, I've been getting plain old lazy, it is a simple to do job, rang Toyota this morning, picking my pads up tomorrow, 29.00 to me, I get discounts lol, but hold on, you said that I would need the rewind tool, that's one tool I have never invested in, any particular brand or place you would recommend matey? And is it worth doing the fronts too, he just said that they were fine but no particular indication to % left!

And you know when I come to do the rewinds...do I need to keep an eye on the brake fluid reservoir in the engine bay?

 

12 minutes ago, Notoyboy said:

 

Sam, Martin is correct. The fluid may over spill, so have something to catch any fluid that may come up. When the pedal is pumped the fluid should go back down a little. Basically fluid displacement.

You do not need to bleed the brakes unless you intend to change the fluid or replacing a pipe, piston or any other part of the brake system! I have seen this mistake and what should be a few seconds pumping, ends up hours of headache. Just pump the pedal.

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Hi guys , I can confirm a few points about the fan belt . I have a 2010 2.0 avensis T27 . I used a Continental belt.  Before you start make sure you have a diagram or drawing of the belt route.  I removed the driver side wheel and removed the plastic access panel to the crankshaft.  Here you can put your 22m spanner on the tensioner and remove the belt from the crank shaft first.  Be advised that there is very little room to work with . To remove the old belt totally you will have to twist the belt to remove it past the other pullys . To fit the new belt I tried 3 times and found that on the 3rd time,  it was best to fit the belt to all the top pullys and finish at the crank . With the aid of an assistant.. you take the pressure off the automatic adjuster with your spanner through the wheel arch  and have the assistant slip the belt on to the crank . There is zero room at the top to get your spanner on . 

20181228_235845.jpg

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