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devanxom

Replacing Front Discs And Pads

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Hiya all,
 
I'm about to replace the front discs and pads on my daughters Toyota Yaris (T3) 2003 (French build).  I noticed the front wheels were making a noise and now I've managed to take the wheel off I can clearly see the pads are worn.  I'm pretty confident doing the job as I was easily able to take the caliper off, however, I want to make sure I get the right replacement parts.
 
Measuring the disc it appears to be 235mm in diameter and the pads 130mm in length and 45mm wide.  tai nhac chuong There is a mention there are two types of calipers so want to make sure I get the right one.
 
I believe the ones I should be getting are:
 
http://www.ebay.co.u...=STRK:MEBIDX:IT
 
Can anyone provide confirmation or further assistance in regards to replacing the discs and pads.  It looks easy but I haven't tried to take the discs off yet.
 
Many thanks in advance.
 
Nick

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Buy a haynes manual, Make a note on paper how you take the old pads out, clip etc. Buy official toyata parts from a main dealer.

If it's making a noise, in my experience, a calliper could be siezed or wheel bearing shot.

get a mechanic to have a quick look after you do the brakes, 

EDIT: By the way forgot to mention you will need a piston compressor to push the piston back in the calliper to fit the new pads.

Edited by TimothyB
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As I recently found out Toyota prices for brake pads are getting silly,the next time I change mine I'll use brembos.If buying from a motor factor you need to tell them you're car has Bosch brakes (as opposed to nissin on the Japanese version).Seriously, dont buy pads off E bay .Theoretically the discs should just lift of (I can't remember if they have a retaining screw,if they do it'll be included with discs) but in practice they will be corroded in place to a greater or lesser extent if you're lucky a few blows from behind may free them but sometimes they can get very  stuck.The problem is if you damage them trying to remove them (reasonably likely) then fail, you have an undrivable car.

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Quote

The problem is if you damage them trying to remove them (reasonably likely) then fail, you have an undrivable car.

Not True.

Quite often the head of the grub screw snaps off, You can replace the disc without this screw, safely, as the wheel holds it in place. 

Any garage or dealer will tell you the same. Try a good soak in wd40 before you try.

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The WD in WD40 actually stands for Water Dispersal. It's actually pretty rubbish as a penetrating Oil to release corroded parts.

Popular Mechanics did an article on it and it came out 0 out of 5 tests. http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/how-to/a6064/wd-40-vs-the-world-of-lubricants/

 

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To add to above, do not let the caliper hang by the brake hose, tie it up. As to a compressor if you place one of the old pads back in and you can use a G clamp to push the piston back. Using the old pad this way will ensure that the piston is returned in the housing squarely. As you do this keep your eye on the brake fluid level in the reservoir As the fluid is very corrosive to any paintwork.I usually wrap a piece of rag around it  in case it overflows By the way Ferodo pads are also very good this may help as it is a very good article and you will find most brake are put together this way

 

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4 hours ago, TomdeGuerre said:

The WD in WD40 actually stands for Water Dispersal. It's actually pretty rubbish as a penetrating oil to release corroded parts.

Popular Mechanics did an article on it and it came out 0 out of 5 tests. http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/how-to/a6064/wd-40-vs-the-world-of-lubricants/

 

Interesting, Heres another interesting part from that article:

Quote

But its best ability may be discouraging rust. After all, it was first used in the 1950s to prevent corrosion on the Atlas missile. If it's good enough for an ICBM, it's good enough for those garden shears.

Awesome!

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After struggling with a stuck alternator I can't shout the praises of Plus Gas enough. Amazing stuff!

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I suspect that in the 3+ years since the last post he has got the job done!

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I would hope so to.

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