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YarisHybrid2016

Yaris Hybrid Fuel Economy

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I've sort of given up in recording the MPG figures as we were getting between 55 and 65 mpg depending on routes and usage.

They were - and still are I suppose - much better than any other car we've ever owned.  Living here in Cornwall with the incessant hills, MPG suffers compared to somewhere flat or gently undulating.  I don't care what MPG figure we're getting, but we're safe in the knowledge that the figure is possibly 15 to 20 MPG better.  50% better perhaps.

 I have noticed that braking is far less in a hybrid compared to a "normal" car, so that's a bonus too.  This is the first car that the rear wheels get dirtier than the front ones.  This is because the rear wheels pick up the muck like a "normal" car, but the front ones don't get coated in much brake dust at all.

Very very VERY pleased ........................ and I don't need the figures. :biggrin:

Mick.

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I treat the mpg like a game, I always like to beat my previous score. :-D


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1 hour ago, Anthony Poli said:

I treat the mpg like a game, I always like to beat my previous score. :-D

Pretty much the same here! :biggrin:

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One guy at work hates me, for telling him how well I have done and how infrequent that I visit a petrol station. There again he drives diesel and not very economically, since he is always late for work lol


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I get strange looks from new petrol station staff when I pay for just a gallon of fuel. :biggrin:

Last winter I wasn't sure how many miles I had remaining to the bottom of the empty mark, so called into a petrol station to put in the minimum quantity the pump would deliver so I could get home and fill up there. The guy asked if I was sure it was £2.30 of fuel I had put in the car. :laugh::laugh:  He even looked to see what I was driving.

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It's a pity that the fuel tank is so small.  Why it can't be the same size as a similar sized car, I don't know.

Our Hybrid has a tank of 36Ltrs - 7.9galls, whereas a normal petrol car of a similar size has maybe 50Ltrs = 11galls .................. like our Renault Clio.

We've had many Minis over the years.  First car I owned was a Mk2 Mini Van, and that had a fuel tank of 6.5galls = 30Ltrs.  Later Minis had 7.5gall tanks = 34Ltrs.

We recently sold our Fiat500 and that had a pitifully small tank of only 35Ltrs and at circa 40mpg or even less, we were filling up rather frequently.  At least the Hybrid is much more economical, but we're still filling up far too often ....................... so I reckon the Yaris Hybrid's tank is too small.

Mick.

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Do the maths - 8galls x 55 mpg = 440 miles. My Astra, 11 galls x 40 mpg = 440 miles. In this case size doesn't matter.

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I understand the maths of course. :biggrin: My issue is that the tank could be like any other car of a similar size, and you could go even further between fill-ups.

What is the tank size on a petrol Yaris?

Mick.

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So it's the same then.  Strange.

Yaris is physically bigger than our Clio, but with a much smaller tank.

Years ago, we had a Peugeot 205 diesel.  That had a 50Ltr tank and would do 500 or even 600 miles between fill-ups and was a smaller car than a Clio or a Yaris.  It's the Yaris that stands out as being strange with a small fuel tank.

Hey-ho, it matters not really.  It's a lovely car, and it's fantastic, so who cares eh? :biggrin:

Mick.

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1 hour ago, Mick F said:

I understand the maths of course. :biggrin: My issue is that the tank could be like any other car of a similar size, and you could go even further between fill-ups..

The non-hybrid Yaris has a 42 litre tank (so this can be considered the design max.), so we swop 6 litres for a traction Battery - OK by me :cool:

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In the supermini sector a fuel tank capacity in the low to mid 40's currently seems to be the norm.

Aygo (as a comparison) - 35 litres; Yaris hybrid - 36; Yaris - 42; i20 - 50; Polo - 45; Fiesta - 42; Clio - 45; 208 - 50; Micra - 41; Rio - 45; Corsa - 45.

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Is it? I thought the tank was 42 litres! Well it is on the Mk1 and Mk2 Yarisusesusises anyway... My Mk1 D4D would do 600 miles on 40 litres :P

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2 hours ago, Cyker said:

Is it? I thought the tank was 42 litres! Well it is on the Mk1 and Mk2 Yarisusesusises anyway... My Mk1 D4D would do 600 miles on 40 litres :P

Thats progress for you lol

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Hi Fellas, reading this thread with interest (on the loo)😁

So - been considering purchasing a Yaris hybrid for Mrs Hicardo. Her current steed is an auto Saab 9-3 which does an average 22.7 mpg on her 2.2 mile commute (country traffic free roads) plus a few 10 mile trips here and there 

Relating to something mentioned earlier, do you think it would be worth it buying the  1.3 or 1.5 petrol in preference to the hybrid, due to shorter warm up cycle, and cheaper initial  purchase cost? Ie under these driving conditions, car engine often cold and not often fully warmed, is a hybrid Yaris worth it?I have an Auris hybrid and on the same route it gets between 35 and 40 from cold.  She'd prefer a smaller car. And it has to be automatic.

Thoughts?

 

 

 

 

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@Ant - Yeah, it's a real !Removed! I'm having to change to a petrol one because of London blaming everything on diesel cars now :(

@Hicardo - You probably should have started a new topic for that question! But yeah, that's a tricky question... In terms of economy the 1.3 would make the most sense because it sounds like she basically doesn't drive it at all aside from a short-range commute. Heck, I think an Aygo would be more suitable than a Mk3 Yaris for such a use-case, except it has the MMT automatic gearbox which is considered one of the most unreliable autoboxes that Toyota still make. (Why they haven't put in the apparently far better CVT, which is on all their other cars, is a mystery to me!)

However, if she really needs an automatic, the Yaris Hybrid has IMHO the best automatic system of any non-hybrid car so then again it might be worth spending a bit more for that, plus the hybrids seem to hold their value better than regular petrol cars (I'm waiting for the Prius+ to go down enough so I can swap my dad's Corolla Verso for one but **** they won't go down!!)

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23 minutes ago, Hicardo said:

So - been considering purchasing a Yaris hybrid for Mrs Hicardo. Her current steed is an auto Saab 9-3 which does an average 22.7 mpg on her 2.2 mile commute (country traffic free roads) plus a few 10 mile trips here and there ...... and it has to be automatic.

Thoughts?

You have to check out a Renault Zoe with such a small commute. You can also pre-heat (or cool) the car - no more de-icing, etc. If you are mega rich, choose the BMW i3. They both drive like the Toyota hybrids, but are quieter under power.

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The i3 is surprisingly nice inside and to drive, although like the Yaris Verso I think it is horrifically ugly :P

The biggest problem with the i3 is the cost; It is very expensive for what it is IMHO. And while you do save money on fuel, the servicing is a Tesla-level ripoff and the tyres are insanely expensive for what they are because they are a weird size, plus the front and rear use different tyres so you can't even swap them round. They also seem to wear quite fast, probably because they are so narrow abut grippy.

Not had a go with a Zoe... ;)

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Hi Fellas, reading this thread with interest (on the loo)
So - been considering purchasing a Yaris hybrid for Mrs Hicardo. Her current steed is an auto Saab 9-3 which does an average 22.7 mpg on her 2.2 mile commute (country traffic free roads) plus a few 10 mile trips here and there 
Relating to something mentioned earlier, do you think it would be worth it buying the  1.3 or 1.5 petrol in preference to the hybrid, due to shorter warm up cycle, and cheaper initial  purchase cost? Ie under these driving conditions, car engine often cold and not often fully warmed, is a hybrid Yaris worth it?I have an Auris hybrid and on the same route it gets between 35 and 40 from cold.  She'd prefer a smaller car. And it has to be automatic.
Thoughts?
 
 
 
 


Have you let her drive the Auris?
Just to see how good the mpg looks for a different driver.

Hybrids are like marmite, there are lovers and haters.



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thanks for the replies.

I3 interesting, but prob too expensive and not the jump aboard and go, easy to drive vehicle she needs. Plus we.re rural so use winter tyres, and therefore ability to change twice a year cheaply is useful. Been trying to get her to try the auris but she says it's still too big ( I know). Hence the Yaris is favourite right now.

Back on topic, though, it was which Yaris to choose from economy perspective, given the short range nature of her driving. She does about 2000 miles a year only. Hybrids are nice I agree, and you can manoevre around the driveway without the engine making noise etc

 

 

 

 

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The Yaris hybrid does work and we are happy with ours. It’s more economical than my Auris hybrid.
Short journeys don’t bother me as it still gives better mpg than a normal petrol car.


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17 hours ago, FROSTYBALLS said:

In the supermini sector a fuel tank capacity in the low to mid 40's currently seems to be the norm.

Aygo (as a comparison) - 35 litres; Yaris hybrid - 36; Yaris - 42; i20 - 50; Polo - 45; Fiesta - 42; Clio - 45; 208 - 50; Micra - 41; Rio - 45; Corsa - 45.

Yes, I see this as the norm nowadays.

Small point ............. the Clio has a 50Ltr tank, not a 45.  Well, at least ours does.

If the petrol Yaris has a 42Ltr tank, where is it?  I suppose it must be high up under the back seat where it would impinge into the Battery position.  Other cars have the (bigger) tanks lower than that.  I wonder if it actually wouldn't impinge into the Battery area  if they designed it not to, but maybe they couldn't be bothered as the range is adequate enough.

Mick.

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The tank, at least on the Mk1 and Mk2, is right under the rear passenger seat. You can see it if you look under the car! It's right behind the spare wheel well and rear ARB if looking at it from the back.


@Hicardo - From a purely economical view, the Hybrid is unjustifiable for such low mileage; You'd never make back the difference in cost before you'd had great-great-grand kids!
If she didn't need an automatic, I'd highly recommend an Aygo or an Up!, maybe even a Smart! (Don't know about the Zoe but maybe it's worth a look? I am normally tremendously racist towards French-cars tho' because they have, at least in the past, had a shockingly bad reliability record!)

So whether to get a hybrid or not will become a question of whether you want to pay a bit more for a better automatic gear system and for the better residuals, more than fuel costs...

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For short commutes in an automatic with pre-heating, having off road parking but no (useable) garage, an EV is the best option. BTW, whilst the Zoe is available very cheaply, never buy a hybrid or EV without a manufacturer's warranty that can also be extended cheaply. The Toyotas are good, my hybrid is now protected through 7 years for around £300. Compare this to the BMW i3 which seems to cost over £500 per year to extend the warranty. This is the main reason I bought Toyota, the warranty on a 3 year old car (2 years, now extended by another 2).

BTW, there is an VW e-up that is electric - £25000 new :wacko:

You can get a second hand Zoe for £5000 with £49 per month Battery rent - new ones can be got for £12000.

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Go electric. No car with an internal combustion engine does well (either fuel economy or reliability) over such short distances (they run chronically cold, which will shorten its life).

You say the commute distance is 2.2 miles, but how long does it take in time to get there?

Were it not for the very short range she's typically driving, I'd say go for the hybrid regardless of anything else, because of the way it works. It's simple, and should be extremely reliable. There are less moving parts than in any other form of drivetrain.

I'd be very tempted for an electric car if they can get the range up to 300 miles (allowing for realistic range to be less, especially in winter). 200 miles is still cutting it too close for some of the journeys I make, and the cost of recharging away from home works out more expensive per mile than the Hybrid (11 p vs. 6 p!!!).

Charging an EV at home is far cheaper than running a petrol car (~£3 to get 200 mile range).

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