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Moving onto a Seat Leon


wastedagen
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Well guys it's time for me to hang up my Auris keys and move on. I have recently p/x my Auris 2.0 D4D with 213,000+ miles for a 2014 Seat Leon 1.2 TSI DSG petrol with Tech Pack. 

I wanted to get an automatic as my 116 mile commute to and from work in the traffic on motorways is getting tiresome for the clutch foot..... Just so many accidents and traffic jams on M1 and M25 now... 

Also, this car is more economical than the diesel Auris ....

 I'd like to thank everyone who has helped me out over the 8 years of owning the car. To any new comers here look around, do your searches as there is a wealth of knowledge and experience in this forum.. 

I will still be loitering around as my parents have a Yaris, plus I may still be able to help out with any experience  I've had while owning this car.. 

Once again thank you all. 

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The engine and gearbox were trouble free over those years. I did have the power steering ecu go. But that was the only major problem. Like many on here I changed the scv valve and had the ecu software updated to solve my cold starting problems.... 

I changed my oils every 15000 miles using a good brand. I changed the gearbox oil at 200,000 miles. Original coolant and clutch. But I did do mostly motorway driving. 

Changed my air-conditioning fad and brake fluid every 3 years whether it needed it or not. 

Yes would have been fun to see if I made 300,000 with this car but the 116 round trip commute on M1 and M25 kinda forced me to a car with Auto box. I have no doubt the car would have made it. 

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Structurally was the Auris still sound? Rust issues anywhere? Were you pampering the car with washes etc or just used it as a tool to get you A -B? Only asking to see what the longevity is of these! Totally understand the switching to auto. Thanks

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20 minutes ago, dankernow said:

Structurally was the auris still sound? Rust issues anywhere? Were you pampering the car with washes etc or just used it as a tool to get you A -B? Only asking to see what the longevity is of these! Totally understand the switching to auto. Thanks

I was on the motorway all the time I saw no point in washing the outside of car. That only ever got done when or if it went into Toyota for any reason. I did look after the inside though. 

I had no rust issues at all. Nothing ever popped up as advisory on MOT Etc.

I never had any issues with water/moisture in the boot or light clusters. 

I did pamper it as in I fixed things as and when they broke, but not as in 'showroom stlye'

It was mainly used as a tool to and from work and dump runs... Lol 

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" I changed my oils every 15000 miles using a good brand. "

Good luck with the new car. I am, however, curious as to why you left oil changes to 15000 miles when the Toyota recommendation is 10000 miles or 12 months, whichever occurs first ? With a Diesel too!

That must speak volumes as to the quality of that engine.

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I wouldn't personally stretch it to 15,000 but to get over 200,000 in 10years using that method just goes to show a good engine and oil. People using fully synthetic oil nowadays really don't need to do changes below 10,000 or 12 month's.

 

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Firstly thanks,

I've always believed that using a good oil that exceeds Toyota spec will allow more milage between oil changes... The Auris proved me right.

But I do realise it does also depend on the style of driving one is doing. For me, because my commute to and from work is all motorway; I only drove about 55-60mph and never booted the car unless necessary, I never put the engine under unnecessary stress... It just poodle along.

So I choose to increase the oil change intervals to suit my sitiation. If I was a town driver I'd be doing every 10,000 as suggested by Toyota...

Also, I do believe using the archoil 6200-EU additive benefitted greatly..... 

 

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Thinking about it I should've taken some pics before getting rid of the car

 

These are the last pics I took from my service about 2 months ago...

 

5e36f418b696535dc412c1fe8776e9f3.jpg2367b058d0cea826c1967650c770b540.jpgf6fd9ebc70dfc8d77f2fd3ef77491109.jpg88cb70b1551f525dede6127a5ac2431d.jpg577218d1612739f2008d87cbc99010c1.jpg9b5a8024310c0c39c824b281f6936352.jpgaeaa3506d960f7afe19b7a762509b1dd.jpg

 

And about 6 months ago while I was getting my new exhaust done.

 

4faa9249992ea6565f461c48e0b15af7.jpg950d490e58ee353e469e14430ed351bc.jpg712393c98a854cd78603f172cee97976.jpg

 

 

This was the colour of the oil when I checked the levels at 12,000 miles.

 

c1b07719873a917d1a8dfae2ac94ddd4.jpg

 

 

It's not brilliant and if you look through the dirt on the body, lol, you can see it was still in good nick.... A reliable and trustworthy car.....

 

 

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Thanks 


I got the exhaust done here

061f3cf701632e643423e28fc39dca70.jpg

And had them just change it for longevity. Bit redundant now.. Lol

I did have them remove this as it wasn't needed...

bc0bb914cfd289dda7b6b5b7be7aa5a9.jpg

And I don't have a dpf, so I didn't need to worry there.

I just chose a dual pipe for looks.... This was spur of the moment decision on the day.

f72f8a174b433f2b3c6d7ef832e0d0b1.jpg
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Maybe engine oil changes should be related to engine hours, not miles.  This is how service schedules are kept in machinery like tractors/excavators/fork trucks etc - they're counted in hours at a certain revs (1500 IIRC).  So one hour at 1500 revs clocks up the same as half an hour at 3000 revs etc.

Consider someone with a 50 mile easy motorway commute doing 5 days/week.  The engine has ran for 10 hours and the car has covered 500 miles/week.  The car would be due a service about every 5 or 6 months (at 12k intervals).  

Now consider someone with 25 mile, hour-long city traffic commute.  The engine has ran the same time but the car only covers 250 miles/week.  The car only needs serviced every year or so.

Which engine has the easier life?

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51 minutes ago, alan333 said:

Now consider someone with 25 mile, hour-long city traffic commute.  The engine has ran the same time but the car only covers 250 miles/week.  The car only needs serviced every year or so.

Which would total around 12-13,000 per year, and the car would need a service at around 10,000.

My city commute (Birmingham) used to be 6.5 miles each way, with a journey time each way of anywhere between 25 minutes and over 1 hour, depending on density of traffic. Public transport would be either two buses or one bus and a 20 minute walk).

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I have a 2008 sr 2.0 d4d with 164,000 going strong so far. I've put over 100,000 of them on and have stuck to servicing as per the car computer. Once it hits 20,000 it gets oil changed which is about every 9 months.

im intrigued to hear that an automatic petrol car can not just match but better a diesel manual on constant motorway runs. Seems like petrol engines have massively improved efficiency diesel not so much. Is that because diesel has underwent more development as last few years and has almost peaked? Intrigued to hear what you got from ur 2.0 mpg wise and what mpg you are getting in the Leon

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Depends how one is judging the fuel consumption.

The official EU fuel consumption figures are not meant to represent real world fuel consumption - the current system is a comparative tool using a standard laboratory based testing regime. In recent years for the majority of cars, the difference between real life consumption and the EU figures has widened quite dramatically. There is a new system being introduced within the next year or so which is designed to be more realistic in terms of fuel consumption.

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2 hours ago, DAF XF said:

im intrigued to hear that an automatic petrol car can not just match but better a diesel manual on constant motorway runs. Seems like petrol engines have massively improved efficiency diesel not so much. Is that because diesel has underwent more development as last few years and has almost peaked? Intrigued to hear what you got from ur 2.0 mpg wise and what mpg you are getting in the Leon

well, he has gone from a 2.0 turbodiesel 6 speed manual to a 7 year newer 1.2 turbo petrol with a twin clutch (rather than torque converter) auto box . Smaller capacity engines tend to use less fuel & the auto box is probably capable of similar or better mpg than the manual.

 VW group has had some issues with the reliability of some of it's DSG boxes & certainly some of the small capacity turbo petrols appear to also have had issues (indeed some of the manufacturers have opined that they perhaps downsized them a bit too much).

 

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No I haven't manually worked it out yet.. Lost my receipts. Next tune.. Lol

But a lot websites are giving these figures for this car

f6a8d4554f492fd92b3ceb6277c13bab.jpgAs as my driving was mostly motorway. Going with extra-urban..

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Think those figures are probably the official EU figures, which dealers, etc are legally obliged to use.

I can believe that.. Stretching the truth to make the car more saleable.....
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