Catlover

Hybrid Engine Warm Up Time

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Now winter weather has set in I noticed the Auris 2010 engine takes a long time to get to its normal temp gauge setting.

A typical 11 mile route I take on mostly A with some B roads, the engine has only just reached normal running temp by the end of the journey. Some of the journey I am running on battery, meaning the engine not running, or engine only running at 1000rpm (have an OBED gadget fitted that shows mph and rpm on windscreen.

In the "good old days", in winter I could slip a piece of corn flake package in front of the car radiator to protect rad from cold winter blast, is there anything I can do to get the rad up to temp quicker on the hybrid?

 

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Duplicate topic deleted.

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Thank you, couldnt find a way of deleting it myself

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Well my fuel economy has nosedived dramatically since getting temperatures less than 10 or 11 degrees and the engine runs quite a bit of the time when stationary now but I've just put that down to the cold weather unless anyone can tell me otherwise. BTW I can't see a temp gauge on mine am I missing something :unsure:

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Perhaps this would help some:-

 

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I've read through the linked topic and find myself in agreement with the last poster, who pointed out that the thermostat compensates for more/less/colder/warmer air through the radiator, by opening or closing appropriately.  Speed of initial warm-up is determined by how quickly the engine heats the coolant - the radiator is irrelevant, as the thermostat is closed at that juncture.

The inference must be that radiator blocking only works if the thermostat is incapable of fully blocking flow through the radiator, i.e. is defective.

However, another factor could be in play - the general airflow under the bonnet will be reduced by blocking, which would offer less cooling to the parts of the engine exposed to it, principally the cylinder block and the sump, but I cannot credit that with more than a minor effect.

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Read the linked topic and cant disagree with anything said, however, that still doesnt address what I have noticed...... the temperature gauge does take longer to reach its "normal" level, and thus keeping the ICE engine running longer then other times.

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Bear in mind that the engine (i.e. large lump of metal) and its fluids (oil and coolant) will be colder to start with in winter, and thus a longer warm-up time is inevitable.  If you garage the car, you could consider a sump heater.

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Yes, well aware of that, but 10-11 miles seems to be a long time to get up to normal, outside temp was still above 0degc, about 4degc, I am surprised it takes so long.

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