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Toyota Avensis 1.6 vvti 2002 Piston Problem


wexwer
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Hello there everyone, 

 I am new to this forum because I have my Toyota Avnesis 2002 1.6 vvti for no more then a couple of months. I have the following problem. As i read the 1.6 vvti and 1.8 vvti engines have a manufacturing problem where their pistons don't have enough holes and as a result they burn oil. I wanted to ask if someone know what is the right type of pistons for my 1.6 vvti engine to replace the problematic pistons and to stop the consumption of oil.

Thanks a lot in advance ! :happy:

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13 hours ago, wexwer said:

Hello there everyone, 

 I am new to this forum because I have my Toyota Avnesis 2002 1.6 vvti for no more then a couple of months. I have the following problem. As i read the 1.6 vvti and 1.8 vvti engines have a manufacturing problem where their pistons don't have enough holes and as a result they burn oil. I wanted to ask if someone know what is the right type of pistons for my 1.6 vvti engine to replace the problematic pistons and to stop the consumption of oil.

Thanks a lot in advance ! :happy:

You need to use pistons with more holes, from later engine which had the modifications. The 1.6 and 1.8 share the same bore, so I assume the pistons should be the same, but needs clarification.

Look at the following which shows the modified piston - http://toyota-club.net/files/faq/04-01-10_rem_1zzfe_eng.htm

The person who had the best experience on this forum is Igormus, who has not posted for a while. Here are some of his replies to posts - 

I could search for more, but the general solution is to change the short engine block or secondhand engine with the fixes.
You will need to find an engine made from late 2005 onwards. 

I avoided the oil burning engines through this forum, as I previously owned a 1.8 leanburn 7A-FE Avensis, the jumped to my current 1.8 Valvematic. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Konrad C said:

You need to use pistons with more holes, from later engine which had the modifications. The 1.6 and 1.8 share the same bore, so I assume the pistons should be the same, but needs clarification.

Look at the following which shows the modified piston - http://toyota-club.net/files/faq/04-01-10_rem_1zzfe_eng.htm

The person who had the best experience on this forum is Igormus, who has not posted for a while. Here are some of his replies to posts - 

I could search for more, but the general solution is to change the short engine block or secondhand engine with the fixes.
You will need to find an engine made from late 2005 onwards. 

I avoided the oil burning engines through this forum, as I previously owned a 1.8 leanburn 7A-FE Avensis, the jumped to my current 1.8 Valvematic. 

 

 

Thanks a lot i will take a look at this. 

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On 5/22/2018 at 10:38 AM, Konrad C said:

You need to use pistons with more holes, from later engine which had the modifications. The 1.6 and 1.8 share the same bore, so I assume the pistons should be the same, but needs clarification.

Look at the following which shows the modified piston - http://toyota-club.net/files/faq/04-01-10_rem_1zzfe_eng.htm

The person who had the best experience on this forum is Igormus, who has not posted for a while. Here are some of his replies to posts - 

I could search for more, but the general solution is to change the short engine block or secondhand engine with the fixes.
You will need to find an engine made from late 2005 onwards. 

I avoided the oil burning engines through this forum, as I previously owned a 1.8 leanburn 7A-FE Avensis, the jumped to my current 1.8 Valvematic. 

 

 

Where can I buy the pistons do you know by any chance.

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4 hours ago, wexwer said:

Where can I buy the pistons do you know by any chance.

Personally, I don't know where to buy apart from engineering firms in UK or look on eBay. Your engine is the 3ZZ-FE and was used in the Corolla. Perhaps you should look in the Coroola forum to find more information from there.
Any big engineering jobs like piston  swaps will be left the garage. I am just a amatuer/diy person who does more general things. I did a disc and pad change on my prother Renault Grand Scenic last week, and had to tell him how to disengage the auto parking brake (EPB). 
Hopefully you will find the parts for your car. 
 

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3 hours ago, Konrad C said:

Personally, I don't know where to buy apart from engineering firms in UK or look on Ebay. Your engine is the 3ZZ-FE and was used in the Corolla. Perhaps you should look in the Coroola forum to find more information from there.
Any big engineering jobs like piston  swaps will be left the garage. I am just a amatuer/diy person who does more general things. I did a disc and pad change on my prother Renault Grand Scenic last week, and had to tell him how to disengage the auto parking brake (EPB). 
Hopefully you will find the parts for your car. 
 

I see so if I understand correctly i should buy pistons from a Toyota Avensis vvti 1.6 from 2005 onwards or a corolla and just go to a mechanic so he can replace them.

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16 hours ago, wexwer said:

I see so if I understand correctly i should buy pistons from a Toyota Avensis vvti 1.6 from 2005 onwards or a corolla and just go to a mechanic so he can replace them.

If I was the mechanic fitting repairing the engine, I would rather swap the engine. I am sure that if you got the pistons, you will also need new rings and other parts. If you got new pistons, you will have to get the new correct size rings and pins. Here is a link to Japan parts for the piston part numbers and the cars that share this part: - http://www.japan-parts.eu/?parttt=&part=13101-0D110&regi=EU&cars=ok Just make sure the engine is 3ZZ or 3ZZ-FE.

Have you read this:- http://toyota-club.net/files/faq/04-01-10_rem_1zzfe_eng.htm

 Experience
 

• The main problem of ZZ series is so well-known that entered the folklore - high oil consumption, which often occured even during the warranty. The main reason - the structural defects causing piston rings seizure.

"There were problems with the engines until 2001, but then they were fixed and now everything is all right" - such straightforward misinformation often used by owners who need to resell cars with these ill-fated engines. In fact, repeated Toyota's attempts to resolve the problem only by installation of a new modifications of the rings were absolutely useless.

Noticeable result was obtained after major upgrade in the mid-2005, when the new pistons and new piston rings were implemented and by half-liter was increased the nominal capacity of lubrication system. Extended 7-year warranty (for most fortunate owners) covered replacement of short-block assembly (~ $4800), but when eliminating the defect at own expense - will have to confine by new set of pistons (~ $660), rings (~ $200) and also valve stem seals replacement (and ideally - together with the timing chain and crankshaft oil seals).

Differences of new pistons - eight large drainage holes insted of four small, and cuts at the bottom of oil ring grooves. Artisanal practice of drilling additional holes for oil drain in the old type pistions is unlikely to be welcomed, in addition these "folk" holes layout quite differs from the new original pistons.
 
piston_300.jpg

At the early 2010s the actual modification of the pistons for most models - 13101-0D062 (overseas market) and 13101-22180 (domestic market). The first "correct" pistons (13101-22032) also have a right to exist, although differs from -22180 by lack of special anti-friction coating on the skirt. Of course, a set of piston rings should be of latest modifications (13011-22220 / 22221, 13011-0D111). New oil gage with the notorious "green mark" on the handle (15301-0D011, 15301-22050) differs from the old one only by control points layout.
 
stick_300.jpg

• But often after overhaul of the engine (even with mileage just 150-200.000 km) reveals a grim picture - there is not hone grid on the cylinder walls or wall are polished to a mirror shine.
 
sleeve-3_300.jpg

In civilized conditions for "disposable" motors with fused in thin-walled liners it must be unambiguous verdict - "to trash". But there is no civilization here... so a lot of "repaired" ZZ are on the russian roads. Moreover, not bothering to search for quality parts, some owners often install dubious origin liners for VAZ engines (analogue of Fiat 124 '1966), another reboring liners for any oversized aftermarket pistons... Since the results of these repairs is difficult to call "Toyota", the installation of "second-hand" engine of the later releases looks more appropriate, luckily that 1ZZ-FE engines were common for all markets (including Japan). But 3ZZ-FE and 4ZZ-FE - these engines were installed in the European versions (for Japan was used the much more successful 1NZ-FE).

Ironically, classic Toyota's engines could be rebored, but in most cases was enough simple overhaul with rings replacement to remove the oil consumption. When at the same mileage repair of ZZ is required, it is far more likely the need of "reboring" - but, alas, have unintended.

This should tell you, all you need to know. 

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22 hours ago, Konrad C said:

If I was the mechanic fitting repairing the engine, I would rather swap the engine. I am sure that if you got the pistons, you will also need new rings and other parts. If you got new pistons, you will have to get the new correct size rings and pins. Here is a link to Japan parts for the piston part numbers and the cars that share this part: - http://www.japan-parts.eu/?parttt=&part=13101-0D110&regi=EU&cars=ok Just make sure the engine is 3ZZ or 3ZZ-FE.

Have you read this:- http://toyota-club.net/files/faq/04-01-10_rem_1zzfe_eng.htm

 Experience
 

• The main problem of ZZ series is so well-known that entered the folklore - high oil consumption, which often occured even during the warranty. The main reason - the structural defects causing piston rings seizure.

"There were problems with the engines until 2001, but then they were fixed and now everything is all right" - such straightforward misinformation often used by owners who need to resell cars with these ill-fated engines. In fact, repeated Toyota's attempts to resolve the problem only by installation of a new modifications of the rings were absolutely useless.

Noticeable result was obtained after major upgrade in the mid-2005, when the new pistons and new piston rings were implemented and by half-liter was increased the nominal capacity of lubrication system. Extended 7-year warranty (for most fortunate owners) covered replacement of short-block assembly (~ $4800), but when eliminating the defect at own expense - will have to confine by new set of pistons (~ $660), rings (~ $200) and also valve stem seals replacement (and ideally - together with the timing chain and crankshaft oil seals).

Differences of new pistons - eight large drainage holes insted of four small, and cuts at the bottom of oil ring grooves. Artisanal practice of drilling additional holes for oil drain in the old type pistions is unlikely to be welcomed, in addition these "folk" holes layout quite differs from the new original pistons.
 
piston_300.jpg

At the early 2010s the actual modification of the pistons for most models - 13101-0D062 (overseas market) and 13101-22180 (domestic market). The first "correct" pistons (13101-22032) also have a right to exist, although differs from -22180 by lack of special anti-friction coating on the skirt. Of course, a set of piston rings should be of latest modifications (13011-22220 / 22221, 13011-0D111). New oil gage with the notorious "green mark" on the handle (15301-0D011, 15301-22050) differs from the old one only by control points layout.
 
stick_300.jpg

• But often after overhaul of the engine (even with mileage just 150-200.000 km) reveals a grim picture - there is not hone grid on the cylinder walls or wall are polished to a mirror shine.
 
sleeve-3_300.jpg

In civilized conditions for "disposable" motors with fused in thin-walled liners it must be unambiguous verdict - "to trash". But there is no civilization here... so a lot of "repaired" ZZ are on the russian roads. Moreover, not bothering to search for quality parts, some owners often install dubious origin liners for VAZ engines (analogue of Fiat 124 '1966), another reboring liners for any oversized aftermarket pistons... Since the results of these repairs is difficult to call "Toyota", the installation of "second-hand" engine of the later releases looks more appropriate, luckily that 1ZZ-FE engines were common for all markets (including Japan). But 3ZZ-FE and 4ZZ-FE - these engines were installed in the European versions (for Japan was used the much more successful 1NZ-FE).

Ironically, classic Toyota's engines could be rebored, but in most cases was enough simple overhaul with rings replacement to remove the oil consumption. When at the same mileage repair of ZZ is required, it is far more likely the need of "reboring" - but, alas, have unintended.

This should tell you, all you need to know. 

Hey man, 

 I didnt get much of what you said I am not very educated about these things. I know my engine is 3ZZ-FE and I want to replace my pistons with the ones with more holes ( so it doesn't make the oil problem anymore) and the rings as well but I don't know the right module so I would appreciate any help with this issue.

Cheers, Wexwer.

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