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SouperJim

Considering a late model RAV4.2

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Hi all, I'm looking for a cheap but reliable family car (2 adults 2 kids and a dog) at around £2k and a 100k mile or so 2nd generation RAV4 is on my radar (2005ish).

I've read all the used reviews, dug up what I can on parkers and honest john etc, but the real info is always from other owners and my search-fu on here seems to be weak. I'm aware of possible DMF and EGR issues if I go for a diesel, but is there anything else I should know? Any issues with the petrol engine? Things to look out for in general?

Am also considering the Honda CRV for the bigger boot, but it's as ugly as a bag or rocks compared to the RAV4.

Sincere thanks in advance for any advice.

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Hi mate, I would go for petrol, I had a 4.2 2004 and so reliable, petrol engine is bulletproof with a cam chain, only issue may be the odd oxygen sensor at around £85 for a genuine denso part, other issue some had was a vibration with the gear lever when in 5th gear , I had to replace my 5th gear assembly which I done,myself not too bad to do and had no further issue, mainly annoying noise but some cases it popped out of gear when in 5th. Most would have been sorted. It was one of the best cars I’ve had, until the 59 plate I have now for reliability.  Good friend of mine at Roy’s motor company in Norwich said petrol models are the better option with diesels needing DMF and turbo at some point in there life time. 

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whilst there is a place for diesels (e.g. if you have to tow heavy caravans, horesbox etc.) I am known for espousing not to run any modern emission-equipped common rail turbodiesel outside of warranty. At some point the additional maintenance costs will eat your fuel cost saving.

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I'm with Grumpy and Heidfirst on this.  My 2005 petrol 4.2 is really good.  I got it at 95,000 miles for £3250 and have just past the 100,000.  Apart from a few cosmetic issues, all it's needed was a replacement driver's sun visor (see my previous post).  Delighted with it.  Read all the diesel woes - don't go there.

I believe the gearbox issue was cured in production by 2004, but mine's an auto and I can't fault it.

 

 

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As above...^^^^^...definitely go petrol...reliable, and the only potential issues are O2 sensor replacement (I think there are 4 on on the Rav).

Great vehicle.

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There are a further couple of issues in respect to the 4.2 that need to be checked out on a potential purchase. 

- The rear brake backplates can corrode badly. It's sometimes possible to cut off the disc shield but if the backplate itself is weakened, it's a replacement at around £900 a pair! (not available aftermarket!). Rav4's have been scrapped after failing the MOT due to backplate corrosion. If the backplates aren't too bad, it's a good idea to treat them in order to limit further corrosion.

- The ends of the steel brake pipes at the rear crossmember (where the steel pipes join rubber hoses) are exposed and prone to corrosion - a common MOT failure on this model. The pipes run above the fuel tank so in some cases, it's necessary to lower the tank to effect a repair. It's a good idea to clean off and rustproof the last few inches of brake pipe.

- The auxiliary belt is often overlooked. The top side of the belt often looks OK but it's difficult to examine the ribbed underside. Cheap and quick to replace but a very significant inconvenience if it fails! Suggest changing the belt at 60 - 70000miles or when a car is acquired and the belt history is unknown.

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I've just picked up a mint full service history
2.0 Vvti AWD 2002 (52) GX 5 door. 100k miles looks like it's never been driven in winter salt underneath, paid 1250 quid for it. Had new brakes all round 2 months ago, and it's got 4 new'ish Dunlop m+s rated tyres.
And I only had to travel 2 miles to get it
Everything is nice and tight on it.
Drives mint.

Sent from my SM-N950F using Tapatalk

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Nice :thumbsup:

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Many thanks for the replies, so stick to the petrol and make sure it's had the aux belt replaced.

Any thoughts on the auto box? The Mrs can only drive auto and while she has her own car, it'd be useful if she could drive the RAV4 too. I don't mind an auto if it's reliable but it's also more tech/moving parts which could go wrong...

Lastly, I'm struggling to find any UK brochures on the web for the 4.2, anyone know where to look?

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Judging by the number of posts on gearbox and clutch issues, and the lack of posts on auto box issues, I'd think it's very reliable.  I believe it's made by Aisin-Warner, and their boxes are used in huge numbers in North America (where very few drive a "stick").  Mine never misses a beat.  I'd say that, provided the fluid is clean and the box does not overheat, it will probably outlast the car.

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The auto gearbox is very reliable but the the gearbox ECU on the 4.2 is a known failure point. The common problem is with the way the gearbox changes gear - it feels as though the gears are slipping or engine is revving to high. It also feels as though the gears are suddenly banging into place. Fault codes: 'P0755 - Shift solenoid 'B' fault', 'P0758 Shift solenoid B circuit electrical' or 'P0750 shift solenoid-A'. Check for this fault when test driving a potential purchase. Fortunately the problem can be fixed for around £250 with a lifetime warranty.

See the link below for UK brochures

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/143205542649?ssPageName=STRK:MESELX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1555.l2649

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Engine wise buy what’s in the best overall condition within your budget, the diesel ‘hate’ is largely misplaced if you aren’t averse to a little work and follow some basic common sense. I say that having owned two diesel 4.2’s that each saw out 100k without any engine issues and something close to 350k total on 4.2 & 4.3 diesels in the family and the 4.3 2.2D has known issues.

My current 55 plate XTR from November (so the last production run) has been pretty reliable since new, a DMF/Clutch at 80K? was nothing to get excited about and Toyota picked up a decent chunk of it as goodwill without being asked, the SCV’s were free even out of warranty, yes it needs a timing belt every 5yrs/60K, but even the main dealer fixed price isn’t unreasonable (£275). Everyone worries about turbo’s, but if you follow basic common sense (the kind of thing anyone who has ever owned a turbo’d car should do anyway) then they seem to hold up well. The biggest issue is Oil starvation followed by carbon buildup on the control rings leading to hesitation/surging. The former is mitigated by regular Oil changes using a decent quality Oil, drop the sump every 10yrs and check/clean and replace the pickup if you’re genuinely concerned, the latter takes me about 60 seconds to alleviate at each service by manually actuating the mechanism and avoiding supermarket diesel and using millers eco seems to helps minimise/reduce carbon buildup. I say that with the original turbo on 120K, so I like to think I must be doing something right? EGR issues are easily preventable, again use quality fuel, and every few years clean the thing, £2 for brake cleaner and an old toothbrush + 30 minutes of your time isn’t that bad. Even after 95k when I first did my current RAV’s EGR (ran on Shell most of its life), the buildup was very minimal. The 4.2 2.0 D4D lacks a DPF, so no worries on that score.

Cheap and reliable at this age are highly subjective terms for a car that has been round the earth four times (100k), by this age/mileage irrespective of engine type, rust and general wear and tear come into play, not so much on the body/chassis (though if you work on your own car, it’s likely at the point where preventative maintenance is a good idea), but things will be starting to wear out and any work that is required, usually leads to more work as parts don’t dismantle as easily and it’s sometimes a false economy to put them back on without renewing them.

For example this month I started overhauling my RAV, it has an MOT and no significant issues other than needing a shock absorber and a diff seal, I initially eyeballed the first phase of work at £4-500 for parts including £190 on tyres. By the time I finish, i’ll likely be 50% over the top end of that, unless you look closely and get underneath it, you really won’t see much obvious to show that money has been spent. I could have done things cheaper if I used lesser brands/used parts or just done the bare minimum to keep it road legal, but my point is expect to get your hands dirty - or pay someone else to - sooner rather than later.

Rav’s are generally pretty reliable/well built and easy to get along with - we’re on our 4th in the family so far 😉

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  • 218 Hybrid Reliability

    1. 1. If you were to consider buying a Hybrid model over 5 years old, would you be worried about the reliability of the Hybrid system?


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      • I would not buy a Hybrid model over 5 years old