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CorollaTS05

Rav 4.3 Advice

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Hi,

   I’m currently on the hunt for a Rav 4.3 with mileage under 80k and in reasonable/tidy condition.  It’s proving to be quite a task.  I keep getting given really inaccurate descriptions off traders a few I’ve seen have been battered.  Today’s had many dings, a heavy clutch, knocking steering going lock to lock, an Oil leak from what looked like the rocker cover and a bearing whine from an engine ancillary.  

I think its it’s probably hard to find what I want as for most owners out there, they generally get used as a work horse taking kids and dogs out and pulling caravans.  So they don’t typically get the love the average same age MR2 or Celica gets for example.

I had had a couple of questions about the 4.3 and was wondering if anyone could help me out.

1.)  Did all the 4.3s eventually develop a steering knock which I believe to be the intermediate shaft?  Was this rectified/modified on the facelift 4.3?  And how much does this repair generally set one back if they aren’t up to it themselves?

2.) Transmission - was the auto the same as the earlier 4.2?  In terms of off roading and towing would the Auto be superior to the manual or have I got this wrong?

If anyone else has anymore info as in what to look out for and other common faults that would be great

thanks

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Hi mate my 4.3 is a 59 plate Auto petrol, 32k on clock and yes steering clonks , spoke to my trusted Toyota Indy garage and basically all the same and not cheap to sort out, I just oiled my steering shaft which definitely helped quieten down. The Auto box is superb, smooth CVT and petrol defo way to go for reliability in my opinion. I was lucky to find mine with one owner and only 22k on clock two years ago.

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Thanks for your reply mate, I’d love to get my hands on a tidy low miler.  Think there quite a rarity!  Although this steering shaft issue is making me think about perusing a tidy 4.2 now as it would irritate me knocking.  Do prefer the look of the 4.3 and it feels quite a lot bigger inside imo.  

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On 9/6/2019 at 9:46 PM, CorollaTS05 said:

2.) Transmission - was the auto the same as the earlier 4.2? In terms of off roading and towing would the Auto be superior to the manual or have I got this wrong?

I, too, am interested in this, but my research has found out very little.  It seems that the 4.2 has a transfer case which mechanically couples the rear drive to the transmission when it encounters the condition  of the front drive going faster than the rear (i.e. the front is slipping).  No electronics involved, and it does not use sensors external to the transfer case.  I have once only encountered conditions where the 4WD was required (deep dry sand which was very likely to bog down a 2WD).  There was a momentary hesitation whilst (I assume) the transfer detected the symptom, and then it all worked as it should.  Nothing dramatic.  This system is used in a number of other cars (e.g. first gen. Toyota Terios and Suzuki Ignis 4-grip).  I saw a video of a Terios is a very snowy carpark which was very impressive.

The 4.3 apparently does use electronic control, (I presume it uses the ABS sensors) to achieve much the same result. I don't know whether the change was to improve performance/reliability or simply because it was cheaper.

 With so little information available, it seems no-one particularly cares.

As regards Auto vs Manual, my experience is limited, but I have noticed, in Suzuki 4WD circles, the majority view is that Auto is superior, unless the terrain is really extreme (e.g. desert rock-crawling), when you might need to fit a larger Oil cooler to the transmission.  My own view is that my 4.2 Auto offers less engine braking (e.g. in "2") than I would like on steep downhill roads .  This could have been improved with the later versions, but I expect it is just a characteristic of the torque converter.

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I had a 4.2 petrol which was brilliant, the 4.3 is more refined and superb to drive only let down Is not a spare wheel which 4.2 had .

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14 hours ago, IanML said:

I, too, am interested in this, but my research has found out very little.  It seems that the 4.2 has a transfer case which mechanically couples the rear drive to the transmission when it encounters the condition  of the front drive going faster than the rear (i.e. the front is slipping).  No electronics involved, and it does not use sensors external to the transfer case.  I have once only encountered conditions where the 4WD was required (deep dry sand which was very likely to bog down a 2WD).  There was a momentary hesitation whilst (I assume) the transfer detected the symptom, and then it all worked as it should.  Nothing dramatic.  This system is used in a number of other cars (e.g. first gen. Toyota Terios and Suzuki Ignis 4-grip).  I saw a video of a Terios is a very snowy carpark which was very impressive.

The 4.3 apparently does use electronic control, (I presume it uses the ABS sensors) to achieve much the same result. I don't know whether the change was to improve performance/reliability or simply because it was cheaper.

 With so little information available, it seems no-one particularly cares.

As regards Auto vs Manual, my experience is limited, but I have noticed, in Suzuki 4WD circles, the majority view is that Auto is superior, unless the terrain is really extreme (e.g. desert rock-crawling), when you might need to fit a larger oil cooler to the transmission.  My own view is that my 4.2 Auto offers less engine braking (e.g. in "2") than I would like on steep downhill roads .  This could have been improved with the later versions, but I expect it is just a characteristic of the torque converter.

Thanks mate for sharing your research, you’ve saved me a lot of googling.  That’s interesting how both variants work slightly differently to get the same outcome.  I think I’m gonna go for an auto, i like not having to worry about a clutch failing too in what are now 12 plus year old vehicles. The hunt continues! 😄

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So today I picked up a Rav4.3 Petrol Auto.  Think I’ve paid too much for it but it’s only done 50k miles.  It has the usual steering knock.  I just wondered with the steering knock does it happen all the time when the intermediate shaft is required?  Reason I ask I’ve been reading through old paperwork of the vehicles and on a health check at Toyota a few years ago it got picked up on and they put it down as requiring a new steering rack at £1900.  On another health check the tech has put it down as requiring a steering shaft.

I also wondered if anyone has any cleaning advice for the side steps, there quite pitted in areas and I’m wondering what would make them look fresher? Thanks

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Very smart motor, I bet your very pleased with her, do you use the side steps or are they really just for show, I’m asking as I’m thinking on getting some for ours but at £500 I’d like to be using them. That’s a very nice colour to👍 cheers 

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Thanks mate, I’m really happy with it, done plenty of wet sanding and compounding the paint today getting out lots of fine scratches, she’s looking much better.  

The side steps can be used to get it (as in there strong enough) but myself and my wife aren’t using them as I don’t find the Rav4 overly high.  I think they would be handy for children and the elderly getting in though.  I think they look smart though along with the front bull bar looking plastics.  Is that £500 for used ones?

On another note does anyone know what this is on my windscreen, before I rip it off.... I’m assuming it’s not standard?

B3AF1605-230A-4991-A9B6-84AB85EBB995.jpeg

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Possibly a mount for a dash cam?

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It’s a clip for mounting either a tag for the French peage network or the old Severn Bridge toll tag

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35 minutes ago, enyajtrebor said:

It’s a clip for mounting either a tag for the French peage network or the old Severn Bridge toll tag

Ahh thanks guys, the previous owner used to cross the Mersey flow everyday so I bet it’s something to do with that 👍

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If you remove it you may damage the sunshade.

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I never thought about that, does seem well stuck on there too.  Think it’s been stuck on with tiger seal 😂.  Il get the hairdryer on it and hope for the best 😬.

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Hi CorollaTS05 no that’s £500 for new Toyota ones.  Also I think there for people with roof racks and them boxes on top of there cars  

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7 hours ago, Buff69 said:

Hi CorollaTS05 no that’s £500 for new Toyota ones.  Also I think there for people with roof racks and them boxes on top of there cars  

Oh yes of course, they would be needed to get to a roofbox

I’ve been giving the Rav a service tonight and I’m a bit puzzled why the airbox seems to have an additional filter which isn't replaceable...?  Why is there what looks like 2 filters in my airbox? 

EA20CE42-AC54-4A72-B6C2-C99C93BED185.thumb.jpeg.45eca06eb14db0e011ad33700b5789be.jpeg

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Hi CorollaTS05 interesting hopefully someone will know know 

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I remove the plastic cover inside the vehicle and then squirt liquid change grease around the steering shaft etc. let it run down the shaft into the joint after a while it solidifies and hopefully you can't feel or hear the knock. You can remove the clip from underneath and get to it that way but when the grease thickens it works for me, done about twenty and then topped up a few year later give it a try, cheap from Wilko's I don't work for Wilko's other shop's sell chain grease......... 

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4 hours ago, the fox said:

I remove the plastic cover inside the vehicle and then squirt liquid change grease around the steering shaft etc. let it run down the shaft into the joint after a while it solidifies and hopefully you can't feel or hear the knock. You can remove the clip from underneath and get to it that way but when the grease thickens it works for me, done about twenty and then topped up a few year later give it a try, cheap from Wilko's I don't work for Wilko's other shop's sell chain grease......... 

Thanks I watched a video on YouTube where an American guy uses a syringe and injects gun Oil past the seal to lubricate the shaft.  What other oils/grease have people on here found cure the problem?  How did you manage to get past the rubber seal?  

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