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DebbieP

Tyres

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I have just had my IQ MOT.  My rear tyres had a depth of 3mm and although the car passed its mot I was advised to change them as the tyres are 7 years old.  The tyres fitted are Bridgestones.  The wear across both tyres are recorded as being even.  Should I consider replacing even though there is plenty of wear on the tyres and I only do approx 6000 miles per year?

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Personally I'd keep them a while longer. You've still got wear left on them and you don't do loads of miles. 

I recently had a similar issue but with less tread depth than your's and the garage said to me I'd get a few more months out of them so I waited. 

Some people may say winters coming so you should change for safety but they're still legal so unless you're driving like Ayrton Senna I'd wait.

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Keep using them, You do fairly low miles and prob don't drive like a maniac, I would  hold onto  them.

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Thank you that’s what I thought.  They are fitted to the rear of the car as I had a new set fitted to the front just last year.  I promise I won’t develop Senna driving skills !

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Just googled how old should tyres be discarded purely on age. Seems to be between 6-10 years. Have a look at the side walls of the older tyres, if any cracks appearing then I would change them now. Although 3mm is above the legal limit, winter is approaching and you may consider changing them now, especially if you get bad winters where you live. When you consider that the rubber contact with the road is about the size of your hand, that is not a lot, and if the tread is getting low and roads bad, and for less then £50 per tyre, I would seriously think about changing them before the bad weather arrives.

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I am in exactly the same situation as you, having just changed 2 tyres the other 2 have approximately 3mm left and are original so about 6 years old. I intend to keep them until next Summer although I will keep an eye on them as there is some minor cracking on the rubber.


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Two things to consider when changing tyres - tread depth and ageing. 

Advice from tyre manufacturers on tread depth varies. Some say 1.6mm (eg Michelin) - tyres become more economical as the tread wears and changing tyres too early costs more in terms of energy used in manufacture and pollution. Some say 3-4mm (eg. Hankook) - better grip with deeper tread.

Ageing - evidenced by cracks in the sidewall, between tread, or both - can result in weak areas, which may be more prone to puncture, etc. It is recommended that tyres over five years old are examined annually by a professional. Tyres over ten years old should be replaced.

 

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Thank you all for your advice and suggestions 

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There is another option too, because your front ones are nearly new you can buy two more brand new same make and model and fit them to the front and front current one move to the rear. Doing so will not cost you much and you will have nice and new and also importantly same tyres all around, safer, economical and smart, tyres problem solved for the next 5 years. 

Regards 

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The latest tyre industry advice recommends fitting the best tyres on the rear.

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56 minutes ago, Stivino said:

The latest tyre industry advice recommends fitting the best tyres on the rear.

This is also recommended by a number of safety groups, including RoSPA (I'm a member of their road safety driving group).

A key part of this rationale, which applies regardless of whether the car is front, rear or all wheel drive, is that tread depth is a key factor in avoiding aquaplaning if you hit standing water (even only 2-3 mm deep) at speed, and rear wheel aquaplaning is more serious re losing control than front aquaplaning (although any aquaplaning is best avoided!).

This is a key reason my own preference has for many years been to replace at 3 mm.  I know there are other factors such as pollution and use of resources, but cost wise doing this makes relatively little difference on a per mile or per month basis expect maybe for people doing phenomenally high annual mileages.

One of several reasons I really don't like space saver spare wheels (although I would absolutely hate having NO spare wheel) is once the car is over 5 years old the space saver's rubber will have started perishing (even tucked away in the boot), and likely has done relatively few miles.

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