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Hybrid Battery Life Expectancy


mrbluesky
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I am thinking of replacing my 2008 Rav with a 2016 Hybrid model however I am concerned with the Life Expectancy of the Battery I understand that Toyota are guaranteeing 2020 models for 10 years. This doesn't help if your budget  only stretches to an older model so I have no alternative now but change my plans and will probably go for a petrol version. I'm sure this  is going to be an issue with purchasing an older Hybrid for other buyers unless Toyota stretch the guarantee to older models!  

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See Hybrid Maintenance ...I don't think a hybrid is any more of a maintenance concern than any other second hand car ...

Toyota has been offering 5-year, 100,000 miles warranty on all models for some time now and it is possible to extend that warranty beyond that. So a 2016 Rav4 hybrid will still be under warranty (unless it is already over 100,000 miles) and my 2013 Rav4 is still under warranty.

They then add that " Having a Toyota Hybrid Electric Service annually will extend the standard cover on your hybrid Battery for another year, or 10,000 miles, meaning your hybrid Battery lifespan can be covered up to a total of 15 years." - which is pretty close to the life expectancy of a normal car ...

And then, if you haven't bothered to take care of the car and have it serviced regularly, you can go for "a Toyota Hybrid Battery replacement with a new warranty".

What more do you want? 😉

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The hybrid Battery warranty is included within the 5 year/100,000 mile new car warranty. Outside of the new car warranty, the hybrid Battery warranty may be extended by 1 year/10,000 miles when a hybrid electric service is done by a Toyota dealer, and the extended warranty can be renewed up to the car's 15th anniversary of first registration. 

See https://www.toyota.co.uk/owners/warranty/toyota-warranty

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Apart from the above, the hybrid Battery is not like a “normal” car Battery, built like a composite box.  The hybrid Battery has individual cells that can be replaced if, say, just one fails. Thus for as little approx £120 the unit is back to full strength.        
Further, the total unit cost has come down in price in the 3 years that I owned a hybrid. Now, new genuine Toyota units are around £1000-£1300 depending on vehicle.      
So all the myths surrounding hybrid vehicles are disappearing before your eyes. Remember Toyota have been the pioneers in hybrid vehicles to the mass market for the last 21 years in the UK.  Check out the warranty other manufacturers give.
Then, take into account Toyota hybrids do not have a starter motor nor alternator to worry about, and some other manufacturers hybrids have a clutch, and you see the perceived cost “risk” is not as big as you first thought.

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I have worked for Toyota dealers since 1977, I think I have got used to them now. Since the Hybrid introduction over 20 years ago I think I have only ever dealt with 4 or 5 Battery replacements, they are VERY robust and something that can be covered under warranty up to 15 years if you have it serviced at your dealer. I would say not to overly worry about Hybrid Battery life, it is something you most likely would not have to deal with 

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Many thanks for all your positive responses they have helped dispel all of the negative thoughts I had and shows the value of this forum to talk some sense into people like me. I am glad I ran it by you all rather than make the wrong decision appreciate all of your help, I did have one other question I like the idea of all wheel drive in your opinion is it worth the extra expense?”

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38 minutes ago, mrbluesky said:

Many thanks for all your positive responses they have helped dispel all of the negative thoughts I had and shows the value of this forum to talk some sense into people like me. I am glad I ran it by you all rather than make the wrong decision appreciate all of your help, I did have one other question I like the idea of all wheel drive in your opinion is it worth the extra expense?”

I'm glad people were able to dispel the myth and help you. Toyota has a reputation for reliability and have been doing hybrids for a very long time so you can be rest assured you will be ok.

 

All wheel drive its only really worth it if you will be off roading or driving in inclement conditions...All wheel drive also affects fuel economy negatively. Your choice ultimately 🙂

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I was watching the excellent fullychargedshow on YouTube and it’s host, Robert Llewelyn aka Kryten from Red Dwarf and host of scrap heap challenge etc was talking about this very thing and part of the chat involved a New York taxi driver who’s Prius was on its original Battery at 670K miles. The rest of the car was falling to bits but the Battery was fine.

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17 hours ago, mrbluesky said:

... I did have one other question I like the idea of all wheel drive in your opinion is it worth the extra expense?”

Come on now, just who would buy a "Recreational Activity Vehicle with 4-wheel drive" (RAV4) with only front wheel drive? What's the point in that? Such vehicles should rightfully be called 'RAV2' to accurately reflect their lowly status ...

Less flippantly, the all wheel drive option is well worth the extra expense if you need or want the security of 4-wheel drive. Living half way up a hill in Wales I want to be able to get all the way home during those two or three weeks of snow every three or four years when we have snow. The system works exceedingly well when needed. The overhead fuel cost is 'marginal' when compared with the differences made by driving style and the weight of each individual's right foot.

As above, if you don't need or want all wheel drive then why pay for it? There are plenty of medium to large estate cars available with front wheel drive that, arguably, represent better value than a Rav4.

And I'd like to see a campaign to Badge the front wheel cars as 'RAV2' to save the blushes of the few that have bought a second-hand Rav4, assuming that it was 4-wheel drive, only to find that it wasen't ... but I doubt that it would get much traction ... 😉

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If you find a hybrid Rav4 that is 4 wheel drive (think it is only in Excel spec for the 2016 model) then it isn't mechanical 4 wheel drive that affects the economy but the rear wheels are powered by electric motors and are only powered up to about 20 mph. As for being useful, the main benefit I have found is when getting into traffic from junctions in the wet - the extra distribution of power lessens the chance of wheelspin while allowing a quick exit. I have a sloping gravel driveway which has caught out my son's BMW (no surprise there) but never been a problem in the Rav4, just good steady progress.

As for the hybrid Battery, no worries there for me, used to have a Prius and reading the forums in the US they seem to keep on going forever. The number of old Prius taxi's about is testamt to Toyota's Battery management ! 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Scotty Kilmer says the only hybrid worth buying is the Prius - built from the ground up to be hybrid, unlike other manufacturers.

The things I worry about and am avoiding so far is cars from other manufacturers with the stop start systems - are the starter motors/alternators/batteries good enough to last 150k miles ??? Is the 0-10% extra MPG worth it, taking into account the expense stop/start add to the cost of the car/potential for it to go wrong/repair costs etc.. I think not.

With this in mind, I will stick to standard petrol engines for as long as possible.

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28 minutes ago, ziauris said:

Scotty Kilmer says the only hybrid worth buying is the Prius - built from the ground up to be hybrid, unlike other manufacturers.

The things I worry about and am avoiding so far is cars from other manufacturers with the stop start systems - are the starter motors/alternators/batteries good enough to last 150k miles ??? Is the 0-10% extra MPG worth it, taking into account the expense stop/start add to the cost of the car/potential for it to go wrong/repair costs etc.. I think not.

That may have been true of the Auris, Yari and previous Rav4 hybrids, but as the current Corolla and Rav4 hybrids use Toyota's latest TGNA platforms, as does the gen4 Prius, doubt whether that view is accurate now.

As regards stop/start, fuel consumption is only one measure that is affected - emssions are also reduced with stop/start engines. See the following article from the RAC:

https://www.rac.co.uk/drive/advice/road-safety/stop-start-engines-and-engine-idling-the-law/

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  • 2 months later...

ummm well, scotty kilmer just bought a brand new toyota corolla hybrid...so......

but there are aftermarket suppliers that will sell you a full recon Battery or just some recon modules to replace the failing ones... they send you the battery/modules so you can fit yourself, or your chosen competent mechanic...or they can do the whole lot.... chrisfix and hoovies garage on youtube (to name a few) showed how to do this with a prius...

i had a vauxhall insignia diesel a few years ago...turbo went at 65k miles and it cost £1500 to replace, via an independant garage, so a Battery after 10-15 years is not so bad...

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