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Adamwibblywobbly

Corolla 1.8 vs 2.0 for motorway driving?

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Hello everyone, I hope you’re keeping safe in the circumstances!

I’m due a new company car and the corolla estate is looking very tempting. 
I have a 4 year old daughter and another baby due in May, so the space in the estate looks to suit us. We also go camping a lot, again the space will support this. 

For work, I use motorways a lot and then travel between sites that are quite close together and then back down the motorway. I probably do around 80 miles per day, and maybe 50/60 of these will be on the motorway (The sites I travel to change.)

I wondered which engine would deliver the better mpg for motorway driving, the 1.8l is showing the better numbers but would a 2.0l sit better at the speeds of motorways?

Does anyone happen to have any examples of mpg on these sorts of journeys?

As you’ll probably tell, it would be my first hybrid, changing from a 2.0l diesel Volvo V60, so I’m trying to get my head around some of it. 
The Tax payments are attractive for BIK and it would be good to have a more clean car as I’m an essential car user for work. 

Thanks in advance!
Adam 

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Hi and welcome to the club. 
For better mpg 1.8 is the one to choose, but if you would like more torque and better acceleration the 2.0 is no doubt faster and more engaging to drive, however both variants are very different from standard diesel cars or turbo petrol. There are already a few treads for Corolla hatch I can recommend to you to read all the posts and you will get a better idea for most common differences between both engines. Either one you buy it’s a great car and you will enjoy driving it as long as you get use to hybrid driving experience. Test drive of at least 30min is recommended and if you in doubt better rent one of these for a week to see if you can get use to before you place an order. 1.8 expected motorway consumption in normal driving conditions is around 60mpg where 2.0 will be around 50mpg. There will be more answers to follow and more helpful info from Corolla owners soon. Best of luck, stay safe. 👍

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Hi Adam,

Here is some statistics for my 2.0 Estate:

Screenshot_51.thumb.png.aa4f32447fffcd900e0b93e16bf70312.png

 

As you can see, motorway consumption is the highest compared to country roads and city (quite the opposite of regular ICE engine car). This can be observed for all Hybrid Corollas present in Spritmonitor.de that have correctly entered data for the type of driving. You can play with the huge data there and find real life consumption data from hundreds of owners. 

You can also use the consumption link in my signature to get more details for the consumption of my car.

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I often use "Sport Mode" to give me a bit more oomph when I need an extra quick getaway, busy roundabouts etc increased acceleration on the Mway. But to be honest normal drive mode is good enough for me 95% of the time

Loving the Hybrid

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Thanks everyone for taking the time out to write back. 
 

It’s sounding like it will get better MPG overall and a little worse when driving on the motorway than my current car, but with an overall tax reduction for a company car. Also, it’s much cleaner. That sounds like a no brainier then I guess!

I did test drive the 1.8 and thought it was lovely to drive and really comfortable which is perfect for me being on the road so much. I didn’t feel like it was underpowered or anything, but I’ll be stuck with it for 4 years and I’m worried about making the wrong decision if my overall MPG is worse based on my travel requirement for work. 
Lots of stuff I’m reading suggests that hybrids are better for city driving and diesel is still the best decision for motorway driving which makes up most of my daily journeys. This is why I wondered if maybe the bigger engine would be better on the motorway. 
 

Thanks for the suggestion of the site OXYGEN, I’ll check that out for more info. 

TonyHSD - your suggestions of common differences would be really useful if you wouldn’t mind. I’ll see what I can find in the meantime. 
 

Thanks again all!

Adam

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Another thing to bear in mind is that your MPG will vary with the seasons. As previously said, 1.8 if you are worried about economy, 2.0 if you want most more power when you want it.

I drive from Northamptonshire to Devon, often using M42 and M5 most of the way. In my 2ltr Hatch, I can get about 53 mpg in the summer, but it drops to about 47 in this last winter. You could probably do a bit better than that, but I like "to get there" if you see what I mean.

I can sometimes get to 70 mph on EV alone unless I floor it, the 2ltr EV is more powerful than the 1.8. 

So really, it depends on whether you are comparing with your current car, and what your expectations are. As I typically used to get 33 mpg with my last car, that is what I based my expectations on, so I am happy.  Hope that makes sense!

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Hi Adam,

the biggest difference between Toyota hybrids and the standard petrol or diesel cars is how the power is delivered to the wheels., acceleration and overall feel when driving especially on motorway. Toyota hybrids use eCVT transmission which is like nothing else in the business. You get very smooth and linear acceleration, no gears to change, no clutches, no shift shock,  it’s like acceleration by airplane on take off. Some people ( auto journalists) doesn’t like that and so they have wrong feeling that Toyota hybrids are slow and unresponsive. We have discussed  many times about that matter in few different posts, if you surf around you will definitely find them. If you are interested of how Toyota hybrids transmission works you can watch that guy’s videos, He is a wonderful teacher. This particular episode shows what’s inside the transmission of the car you are buying if you get 1.8, if you choose 2.0 transmission is slightly different but same overall principle. 
Enjoy 

https://youtu.be/vHc-_E8xWnM

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12 hours ago, Adamwibblywobbly said:

Thanks everyone for taking the time out to write back. 
 

It’s sounding like it will get better MPG overall and a little worse when driving on the motorway than my current car, but with an overall tax reduction for a company car. Also, it’s much cleaner. That sounds like a no brainier then I guess!

I did test drive the 1.8 and thought it was lovely to drive and really comfortable which is perfect for me being on the road so much. I didn’t feel like it was underpowered or anything, but I’ll be stuck with it for 4 years and I’m worried about making the wrong decision if my overall MPG is worse based on my travel requirement for work. 
Lots of stuff I’m reading suggests that hybrids are better for city driving and diesel is still the best decision for motorway driving which makes up most of my daily journeys. This is why I wondered if maybe the bigger engine would be better on the motorway. 
 

Thanks for the suggestion of the site OXYGEN, I’ll check that out for more info. 

TonyHSD - your suggestions of common differences would be really useful if you wouldn’t mind. I’ll see what I can find in the meantime. 
 

Thanks again all!

Adam

How fast do you drive on the motorway? I don't know much about speed limits in the UK. What's traffic like in general - is it possible to set the cruise control, or is the cruise interrupted all the time?

In general with hybrids - every tiny little thing makes a difference. The sum of many small things multiplies to a big differences. So you will see days with awful mpg's - without knowing why. And you will see days with fabulous mpg's - without knowing why.

Air temperature, hot/cold - wheel size - tyre pressure - rain/shower/snow/sunshine - wind - uphill/downhill ----- every one of these factors translates into your mpg's in both good or bad ways.  Diesels are more uniform, they don't care much about little things, and mpg's are often within 10% all year.

I got the 2.0. I choose power over super-high mpg. But my wheel are 16", so I try the get the best out of it.

My overall average with 6500 miles on the clock since new in november is 53,1 mp or 18,8 km/l. I don't thing that's to bad. And with higher temperatures on the way, things can only be better.

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2 hours ago, nielshm said:

In general with hybrids - every tiny little thing makes a difference. The sum of many small things multiplies to a big differences. So you will see days with awful mpg's - without knowing why. And you will see days with fabulous mpg's - without knowing why.

So true Niels.

I believe we should stick this somewhere in the Forum as it describes so well the real world Hybrid usage...

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With the 2 litre having more power the drive is more effortless more of the time. The 1.8 is adequate but for overtaking and general quicker work I’d take the 2.0 if it’s the same cost. 
 

 I’ve recently done more motorway driving and my average fuel consumption is 47-48 with a general mix and slightly warmer ambient temperatures- at a steady cruise at 70mph engine is only turning over at 1500-1800 rpm resulting in about 55 mpg. 
 

You can add about 10 mpg to these for the 1.8 

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I'd go for the 2L every time.

There's no replacement for displacement.

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1.8. vs 2.0 we can talk about it for ages, +&- for both. I will go for 1.8 and here is why: 

bullet proof since 2016, very efficient, I drive a lot and 10mpg difference can equal 1000’s of savings in long run, power is enough, all you need to do it’s floor it in power mode, makes a difference, if anyone said that 1.8 it’s not enough powerful for everyday use even on motorway journeys, or they never floor it or they just want Prius to perform like golf GTi, its not possible. 1.8 perform exactly as any standard petrol non turbocharged and any turbocharged diesels up to 1.8 litres automatics. And here is where 2.0 takes over to comply with bigger more powerful standard cars but because of the power train Toyota uses there are many people -owners that complain how the car drives , accelerate and overall consumption. And here comes another question., Do you really need 2.0 in Toyota hybrid, how much more power and performance you will gain and at what cost in consumption? And the answer is obviously different for the different consumers. For everyone that likes speeds, and to race with the traffic or as recently called “keep up with traffic flow“, 1.8 not enough the 2.0 will also not be suitable, better get the new Golf or Leon or Audi A3., trust me you will be happier. Toyota hybrids are made for relaxing , enjoyable, safe and efficient driving. 
Regards 

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Last summer took my Auris MK2 1.8 hybrid (gen3 hybrid platform) to the south of France (Nice area) from the North West. With 3 adults, two kids and the roof box and it performed very well. Agree, it is not as quick off the line, but when you know the car you change your driving style accordingly. If most of your driving is on open A/B roads, then 2ltr will make more sense, but for spending time in traffic, 1.8 will be cheaper to buy and run.

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16 hours ago, TonyHSD said:

Toyota hybrids use eCVT transmission which is like nothing else in the business.

Apart from the dozen or more other vehicles (Eg; Honda Jazz) that also have CVT gear boxes ;)

"How fast do you drive on the motorway? I don't know much about speed limits in the UK. What's traffic like in general - is it possible to set the cruise control, or is the cruise interrupted all the time?"

I drive at 60 mph in lane one with CC on. I sometimes overtake solitary HGVs or queues of them on an incline but otherwise I'm happy to bimble along behind them. My last trip (a month ago) I managed 62 mpg. In summer I'd expect close to 70 mpg.

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Just my 2pence. 

Think the 1.8 is probably the one for u with 20k+ miles a year and with a young family. The savings will add up over the 2.0 for 4 years. 

With say, just 5mpg better than the 2.0, u will maybe saved £200+ a year. Spend that on your family. 

I do 10k a year so would go for the power of 2.0. 

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3 hours ago, AndrueC said:

Apart from the dozen or more other vehicles (Eg; Honda Jazz) that also have CVT gear boxes 😉

"How fast do you drive on the motorway? I don't know much about speed limits in the UK. What's traffic like in general - is it possible to set the cruise control, or is the cruise interrupted all the time?"

I drive at 60 mph in lane one with CC on. I sometimes overtake solitary HGVs or queues of them on an incline but otherwise I'm happy to bimble along behind them. My last trip (a month ago) I managed 62 mpg. In summer I'd expect close to 70 mpg.

I don't think that is an accurate statement, Andrue.  The Toyota hybrid CVT has no variable belt drive any more. It's all done with solid gears and is much more robust than some other manufacturer's CVTs. There is a series of Youtube videos explaining exactly how it works and they are one of the reasons I decided to go for the Corolla. The performance is different from my previous Honda Civic 1.00 Turbo, but that is more of an impression rather than against the clock, and I am getting mpg similar to my previous previous 1.6 Diesel Civic. The only thing I really miss on my 1.8 Icon Tech is electrically folding mirrors when going in and out of the garage. Toyota should also point out that, as well as Eco, Normal and Sport modes, there is a default 'pootle' mode, which is not helped by the speedo overreading by 4mph.

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1 hour ago, RabButler said:

I don't think that is an accurate statement, Andrue.

I do. Tony's comments were 'You get very smooth and linear acceleration, no gears to change, no clutches, no shift shock,  it’s like acceleration by airplane on take off.' All of those apply equally to other CVT equipped cars. In that respect there is nothing special about HSD. I've been driving CVT equipped vehicles for nearly 15 years ever since my first Honda Jazz.

The technology might be different but the driver experience is not. Although to be strictly accurate the first Honda Jazz with a CVT transmission did actually have a clutch. A helical clutch. But operation was by the ECU so no left foot action was required.

And if you want to really press the point the first commercially available CVT was the DAF variomatic which went on sale in 1958.

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2ltr Vs 1.8ltr it's a matter of opinion, and what you want re performance, or if max economy is what you prefer.

1,8 gives you perfectly adequate performance and most economy. It was the only engine I test drove, and I felt it was fine.

2.0 ltr gives you best power (and for me enjoyment) and Hybrid economy. That is why I say as a 2ltr owner, I don't look at other Hybrids for comparison, I look at other 2ltr non Hybrids. So my car gives me a good drive compared to my last, with 20 mpg saving, without even trying to be economical. Much better when I am. It's horses for courses. The only right or wrong answer is in the hands of the buyer. And fortunately, most Corolla owners think their selection is best. I'm glad Toyota brought out the 2ltr when they launched the new platform, I'd have felt I had missed out if it had been introduced this year as an upgrade. In the event, when I got the 2.ltr having not test driven it,  I was very pleasantly surprised.

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Hi Adam,

My driving pattern (Corolla 2.0) seems very similar to yours. In winter, on winter tires (16 inches), I get around 47-50 British mpg, if I push it a bit. That means ok quick accelerations and around 70-81 mph (the Danish speed limits) on the highway. However, since Xmas I have been conduction a little experiment, trying to push the mpg as high as possible. That means keeping at around 53 mph together with the trucks at very constant speeds. That sucks a bit (a lot actually), but for the last 2000 miles my average mpg has been 59 mpg. It's impossible for me to get above that, at least given the circumstances (winter tires, constant rain and wind, 4-8 degr. C). All mpg are measured, not read from the info screen.

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I used to own an Auris 1.8 hybrid 2016 model estate and found the power of this car very good (136 BHP) but a bit revvy on hills and when needing to acellerate quickly. So when I test drove the Corolla 2.0 (180 BHP) over similar terrain and when acellerating quickly it was obvious the Corolla engine was so much more responsive and effortless with so much reserve power and much less revvy it was a no brainer for me that I had to go for the 2.0. I then test drove a Corolla 1.8 and for me it failed on all counts and not even as powerful as my old Auris. But this is my own personal experience and as previously stated it's what your priorities are when choosing the 1.8 or the 2.0 Corolla. I only do around 8000 miles a year so the mpg is not a major factor  for me but I am getting a constant 51/53mpg right now which I am very happy with. I rarely got much over 58/60mph with my old Auris 1.8. anyway.

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