Sign in to follow this  
piperdave

What to look for when purchasing a used 2013 Auris hybrid?

Recommended Posts

Hi All. I am about to sign for a 2013 ( 24,500 mls) 1.8 hybrid. Anything I should look out for? I have heard that these cars are generally very reliable, is this really true?

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Split into new topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes very reliable. Just mind that thief are targeting the cat from this car. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I dont think you should have any concerns over the hybrid engineering, solid as a rock. The rest f the car ie brakes, suspension etc is like all other cars. You do need to keep an eye on the rear brakes, simply because they are not used a great deal and can tend to stick and not work causing rust of discs. The wifes 2010 Auris hybrid (75k miles) has just had new discs and pads due to that.   Plenty of riving tips on You Tube, if not for the Auris then the Prius Gen3 which has the same Hybrid system, inc engine, as the Auris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many Thanks.

D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd personally want a service history and at the very least the annual Toyota hybrid check for the Battery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am I correct in the assuption that a high mileage hybrid would have worn or weaker Battery compared to a lower mileage one?

Also what kind of mpg do you get on the motorways?

Thanks

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The hybrid batteries on Toyota hybrids have an excellent reliability record. After the Toyota warranty expires, if you have an annual Hybrid Battery health check (about £45 but free if you have the car serviced at a Toyota dealer) the warranty is extended annually up to 15 years - thats how much faith Toyota puts in its hybrid technology. You be hard to find on any forums Toy. hybrid owners having serius problems with hybrid Battery. If an individual cell goes down it can be replalced (by a specialist-its not really a diy job).

Remember with a hybrid, you probably driving 50% of the time on Battery. This means a car covered say 80,000 miles.....the petrol engine has done 40,000. Add the fact there is no alternator, no starter motor, no clutch to go wrong.....which are all expensive items to repair/replace.

How many mpg will and Autis do on a M-Way?  As in all driving - depends how you drive. At 70mph max, I would suggest you not going to get less then 45mpg, and perhaps up to 60mpg maybe a bit more.

What you do get with a Toyota hybrid - is stress free driving. Acceleration is so smooth, no gears changing even though its "auto (a lot of auto boxes you can still detect gear changing). Toyota hybrid engineering is now over 20 years old......and they got it right first time.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MPG depends on your driving habits.  It will always be less in winter.  My wife uses ours now for her dog walking business and gets anything down to 40mpg.  Best I've had was a holiday to Scotland when I averaged a smidge under 70mpg.  I don't use the car computer and have a spreadsheet going back years with mpg of all my cars due to my wifes business and always fill to the brim so I know the figures are accurate. You will also get less mpg if you live in a hilly area as I do and better if you live somewhere like Norfolk where it's flat.  Oh and then there's you're own driving style as well.  So loads of variables but suffice to say it's the most economical car I've ever owned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/5/2020 at 1:05 AM, roks said:

Am I correct in the assuption that a high mileage hybrid would have worn or weaker battery compared to a lower mileage one?

As well as all the above, the driver/journey usage pattern probably has an effect on Battery life as much as mileage, and this is very difficult to establish, understandably.

Also, by way of further explanation as to the long life of the Battery: the car in normal use will generally operate the Battery between 45% and 65% of total theoretical Battery charge (the whole dash displayed span of the Battery charge is actually only 40%-80%  of the total theoretical battery charge).  This extends the Battery charge cycle life enormously, see here:-

https://priuschat.com/threads/understanding-nimh-hypercycles-to-prolong-prius-hv-battery-life.64978/ 

When the batteries (eventually) do give problems, then it is down to one or more cells having different charge/discharge characteristics to all the others.  When this goes beyond a certain threshold the car will post a Battery error.  The failing cell(s) are almost always in the centre of the pack, as these are the ones which run hottest due to  the nature of the air cooling.  The cells can be removed and replaced separately (not at Toyota), but the 'new' cell works best when it matches the existing cells' charge/discharge performance, or else the Battery management will throw another error.  That's how I understand it, anyway..

Anything that gets the batteries hot will shorten their life, Toyota have designed the electric assistance so it is never that strong (heat generation!), so as to prolong the Battery life.

As an example, on another forum there are very occasional posts from hybrid owners who live on the small French island of Réunion, near Madagascar.  It is hot and very mountainous.  The hybrid batteries last about a third as long as they do here!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, here we have a  brilliant answers given already. I just want to add something. That particular car it’s 7 years old and only 25k miles, this is a warning sign and few more checks needs to be done prior to taking ownership. First it’s to establish if the mileage it’s real, second to double and triple check the service history if the car has all it’s service and if they are done on time, Battery health check on both high voltage and 12v Battery, in general batteries likes to be in use, leaving Battery not used for a long time has negative effects. Check for accidental repair. Good to check all 4 tyres and brakes too, tyres might well be the original one that will require replacement due to their age. Brakes also can get faulty due to the lack of use of the car plus hybrids suffer of rusted brakes more than any other cars. That’s pretty much all of it and the second key if available. 
Good luck 🚗

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can use the MOT history check website to determine whether the mileage seems to be correct and see what failures and advisories the car has previously had - https://www.gov.uk/check-mot-history

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys, bit cautious as these Hybrids cost quite a bit of more than a pertrol Auris, they seem to be in the 10-12k+ price tags.

Sorry OP, didnt mean to hijack your thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the input. I now have the car. Dealer serviced every year/ 3,000 mls of its life in a very flat English county. Hybrid is new for me, and its a bit scary using it straight away for work. I am a community nurse! Loving it at present.

 

One Question, can i get Sat Nav retro fitted?

 

Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, piperdave said:

Thanks for all the input. I now have the car. Dealer serviced every year/ 3,000 mls of its life in a very flat English county. Hybrid is new for me, and its a bit scary using it straight away for work. I am a community nurse! Loving it at present.

I reckon you going to find it the most relaxing and easiest car to drive you have had.

re retro fit sat nav. I pretty sure it will already have been done. Suggest you do a search on this forum. Be careful though, map updates can be very expensive and still not fully up to date. My opinion is buy a stand alone sat nav with free updates - likely to be a much cheaper option.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations for the new motor 👌 

Factory sat navs are usually not as good as smartphone can be, if you have a smartphone with good readable display you can download google maps even using them offline if you have data restrictions and this is the best sat nav for any car. You will need a good phone mount something like Kenu airframe and you are good to go. Very important step of the ownership of the car is to secure the catalytic converter with cat lock, remove all hybrid badges and always park when possible in secure car parks. This is important to secure your car and prevent nasty surprises in future. We don’t want to stress but to help you avoid unnecessary headaches. 
All the best 👍 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this