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1.8 or 2.0 corolla


barrycoll
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Did not try the brisk acceleration... I may give it a try to see. As stated by stopeter44, people expect you to reach the max speed limit right after the green light. If you are spending more than 2 seconds at it you get a symphony of howling cars behind you... But the problem I could see on my consumption is that the moment I'm going uphill, the EV assistance is not running (I was expecting EV to come to help reducing the load in that precise situation). Therefore in those regular situations I'm just driving a standard 2.0l car....Not something I was expecting from an hybrid car. 

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3 minutes ago, Hitman77 said:

Did not try the brisk acceleration... I may give it a try to see. The problem is as stated by stopeter44, people expect you to reach the max speed limit right after the green light. If you are spending more than 2 seconds at it you get a symphony of howling cars behind you... But the problem I could see on my consumption is that the moment I'm going uphill, the EV assistance is not running (I was expecting EV to come to help reducing the load in that precise situation). Therefore in those regular situations I'm just driving a standard 2.0l car....Not something I was expecting from an hybrid car. 

Sounds like you were expecting near EV vehicle performance from a Toyota hybrid. Pity you didn’t join the forum sooner, you would have learnt from all the posts what to expect. You still have a mighty fine car.

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I suspect my Mk4 Yaris has some sort of incline/gradient sensor as I've noticed it *will* supply extra EV power sometimes when I am going up a hill, certainly earlier on the power bar than normal, but the only guaranteed way to get the ICE and MG2 to supply power is to push the car into the Power part of the power bar.

I also find if I just stamp on the accelerator the car really doesn't seem to accelerate very quickly, like there's a lot of lag before it reacts and it does that thing everybody hats about CVTs where it jumps to 6000rpm but doesn't accelerate significantly faster for several long seconds. If I push the accelerator more progressively so the engine RPM climbs more in line with the speed it feels like there is a lot more torque and that I'm accelerating faster. My Mk2 was a lot like that - If I wanted to overtake and did a double-downshift and floored the accelerator there'd be a lot of noise but very little feeling of progress, whereas a more progressive pedal input gave more of a feeling of torque (Admittedly still not a lot, that 1.33 was not very torquey!).

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having read the revues, we went for the 2lt , delighted with our choice it takes the long inclines on the m62 with ease, and has enough grunt for overtaking on country roads. i am happy with the mpg having returned from 20+ years of diesels, the car is perky, comfy and handles great , yes i am heavy footed always called a mad ***** but at 71 years old who the "f..." cares, buy the 2lr and enjoy the car about town or on the motorway, to hell with the price of fuel the price goes up / the price comes down, buy what your heart tells you.

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2 hours ago, Hitman77 said:

Did not try the brisk acceleration... I may give it a try to see. As stated by stopeter44, people expect you to reach the max speed limit right after the green light. If you are spending more than 2 seconds at it you get a symphony of howling cars behind you... But the problem I could see on my consumption is that the moment I'm going uphill, the EV assistance is not running (I was expecting EV to come to help reducing the load in that precise situation). Therefore in those regular situations I'm just driving a standard 2.0l car....Not something I was expecting from an hybrid car. 

Because the car decides when and how to use the Battery to help the petrol engine, it might not make sense to us as drivers going uphill only on engine power with almost a full Battery but the car knows what’s the best for the Battery health and the efficiency. Floor it and you may get an instant battery help but that also might be just for a short moment and then again continue on petrol alone, all that happens to me everyday and I am used to it now. Nothing strange at least I can confirm it, I had a few hybrids and they all do it the same. There is also another exactly opposite event when the car is cold and you are accelerating the ice is running at constant rpm while the e motors are propelling the car and when that happens it gives driver some sort of feeling that you are driving an ev with range extender 👍 

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When going uphill the Battery is almost discharged as I have 2-3 km on flat ground before going up (all done on EV). Based on my current consumption, actual autonomy is ~510km (450km "consumed" for 255 actual km, with 1050km total available at the begining). This is very very low... I'm wondering whether the 1.8L would perform better in my present case (may consume less even though it has to go higher in rpm since that was the case with my older 1.3L non hybrid car). But that needs to be confirmed by an actual drive test on the same path. 

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1 hour ago, Hitman77 said:

When going uphill the battery is almost discharged as I have 2-3 km on flat ground before going up (all done on EV). Based on my current consumption, actual autonomy is ~510km (450km "consumed" for 255 actual km, with 1050km total available at the begining). This is very very low... I'm wondering whether the 1.8L would perform better in my present case (may consume less even though it has to go higher in rpm since that was the case with my older 1.3L non hybrid car). But that needs to be confirmed by an actual drive test on the same path. 

First of all, you will never get 1050 km. from a full tank of petrol. My car was also very optimistic in the beginning. You won't get more than 800 km., maybe just 700 km. in the winter season. When the calculated range hits "0", you can fill up 38,5 liters. Total fuel capacity is 43 liters, but I've never filled up with more than 40 liters, no matter how far I've stretched the last drops beyond the "0" range mark.

Your engine is brand new and super tight every where, it takes a while for everything to loosen up. Take the car out for a long drive 200-300 km. or longer, relax, set the cruise control, and just let the car and engine get broken in.

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Iv had my 2.0 HB for nearly 2 weeks now just put my first lot of petrol in and got 44mpg. I’m happy with that though, Iv done a lot of short journeys, my previous car was a 2.0petrol and that at best could get 28mpg doing my commute and Iv done a lot of city driving where I’d be lucky to touch 20mpg so this is a revelation for me. On my city trips I can get 50-70mpg for a trip on the my T app without to much bother. I’m sure as I get used to the car I could improve this a bit but I’m happy with it as is plus mine is the GR sport so has bigger tyres which impact it too

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  • 2 weeks later...

I switched back the Toyota with my old 1.3l. From what I see, given the many hilly trips I am doing regularly the 2.0l would have been a gas consumption ogre (not speaking of going to higher snowy mountain area (grade >8-10%). Definitely not a car fit for my usage (cost is also prohibitive as compared to other manufacturer like Honda, etc. ). Too bad, I am really deceived by the performance of the hybrid (though a less powerful engine may have been a better choice). 

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1.8 it’s the more efficient option for sure but driving style will play a role too, some 2.0 owners report as good mpg as 1.8 ones. Going uphill with Toyota hybrids doesn’t burn more fuel than standard ice car but when you go downhill you will be 0 consumption and recharge the Battery where others will drink a bit and wearing their brakes , heat and energy loss. Hybrid wins. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

 I treated myself a 1.8 excel touring sport model & it's been 1 month.

Love it to be honest.

It comes down to what you going to use it for.

The 1.8 has a bigger a bigger boot than the 2.0.

The fuel economy is better in the 1.8 than the 2.0.

The 1.8 has 17inch wheels & 2.0 has 18s but I think they changed the spec again.

Unless you are commuting with a boot full or towing then I would go for the 1.8.

As you know the weather was cold so my car was hitting over 50s mpg but I only go 2 junctions of the motorway but the other day I got just over 60s mph.

But I was surprised when I came back from a training coubik & it was town driving for 20mins & 73 mpg 😳

I couldn't believe it.

I'm only using Costco E10 95 

I give you a little advice. If you looking at buying a car ask the private taxi drivers because they are in there cars day in & out plus pure driving.

They will tell you as it is that's what made me buy 1 & I'm a electrician.

The reasons I got the toyota Corolla touring sport 1.8 excel was I wanted a reliable car as my last car I was plugging in a obd2 reader to clear the codes every time I drove it & it did 33mpg.

I wanted hassle free driving plus I have 1 child moving from Birmingham to Nottingham

Then I have 1 in Cantabury university

Then the 3rd either Bradford or Norfolk university.

So to me it's ideal moving stuff around for them aswell we can visit them.

I know it's hard & I sat & researched alot & watched YouTube videos.

The 1.8 engine is been around for along time & been in award winning Prius but the 2.0 is still new so it's a bit hard to say.  But I would try & book a few driving test on both 1.8 & 2.0 from Toyota because if they want you to buy a car from them then they should. 

If you need any more advice just keep asking 🙂

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I’m debating between a hatchback be touring sports

the TS looks a bit like an Uber but it does have more space both for passengers and luggage

im only getting the 1.8 (insurance and fuel economy, the 2.0 will def encourage the boy racer in me too much)

will it feel a bit underpowered compared to the hb?

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From what I've read there's very little noticeable performance difference between the hatch and the estate versions. Makes sense as they are essentially the same car, except the estate one has the back extended out a bit!

If the extra length is not an issue and the extra space will be useful, the estate one is a good pick, as the hatch ones, esp. the 2.0, are a bit below average for boot space.

I have the opposite problem in my Mk4 Yaris - It has the biggest boot of any of my previous ones, but I'd much rather it had a smaller boot as it also has the worst rear passenger space of any of my previous ones!

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1 hour ago, Cyker said:

From what I've read there's very little noticeable performance difference between the hatch and the estate versions. Makes sense as they are essentially the same car, except the estate one has the back extended out a bit!

If the extra length is not an issue and the extra space will be useful, the estate one is a good pick, as the hatch ones, esp. the 2.0, are a bit below average for boot space.

I have the opposite problem in my Mk4 Yaris - It has the biggest boot of any of my previous ones, but I'd much rather it had a smaller boot as it also has the worst rear passenger space of any of my previous ones!

Length I don’t care about, if I could afford it I’d have a Rav4 or NX

in USA I was driving a Honda Pilot (don’t get such big cars in UK)

there is the view that it seems like an UBer

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I don’t know what I would do if it was me, I’ve configured a Corolla a few times for the craic’h, and there’s a 2k€ price difference between the 1.8 and the 2.0.

Boot space? As long as I can do the shopping run to the farmers cooperative, then I’m fine. Rarely need to move gear around. 

The idea of 184 bhp on tap is seductive, but does anyone really need that? 

The Corolla is very likely more comfortable on longer trips than the Yaris, but any car over 4,2 metres is too big in my book.
 

 

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I drove  1.8 HB and TS before ordering the TS. I couldn't feel any difference in performance. We had the car 15 months and find in the real world performance is fine as is fuel consumption.

As estate cars go it's not that big, but the extra headroom in the rear for passengers and space in the boot works for us. 

The only thing missing from the car order options was a spare wheel. The tyre repair kit supplied is of no use other than for very small holes. This was easily sorted by buying a second hand  one. 

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8 hours ago, Revolver said:

I drove  1.8 HB and TS before ordering the TS. I couldn't feel any difference in performance. We had the car 15 months and find in the real world performance is fine as is fuel consumption.

As estate cars go it's not that big, but the extra headroom in the rear for passengers and space in the boot works for us. 

The only thing missing from the car order options was a spare wheel. The tyre repair kit supplied is of no use other than for very small holes. This was easily sorted by buying a second hand  one. 

Interesting you found the estate to have more headroom than the HB. I found the opposite when I tested the two in the showroom. Must be only 2mm or something insignificant, however for me was the difference between my hair catching the roof lining and not. 
 

Noticably more legroom in the estate though  

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34 minutes ago, Gray86 said:

Interesting you found the estate to have more headroom than the HB. I found the opposite when I tested the two in the showroom. Must be only 2mm or something insignificant, however for me was the difference between my hair catching the roof lining and not. 
 

Noticably more legroom in the estate though  

I must admit it was some time ago (pre covid 19) when we had test drives, but TS felt more roomy when briefly sitting in the back, but since then I haven't sat in back and not had any complaints from rear seat passengers so far. 

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Yeah, the rear seats are moved back a bit compared to the hatch version. It annoys me that reviewers whinge about the smaller boot space in the Corolla estate compared to the average, but don't acknowledge the much better passenger legroom.

I wish they'd had the same priority with the Yaris hybrid - After all, if you need more boot space you can drop the passenger seats, but if you need more passenger space... well you can't do anything! (If only they'd kept the sliding rear bench like the Mk1 and Mk2 had!)

 

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31 minutes ago, Cyker said:

Yeah, the rear seats are moved back a bit compared to the hatch version. It annoys me that reviewers whinge about the smaller boot space in the Corolla estate compared to the average, but don't acknowledge the much better passenger legroom.

I wish they'd had the same priority with the Yaris hybrid - After all, if you need more boot space you can drop the passenger seats, but if you need more passenger space... well you can't do anything! (If only they'd kept the sliding rear bench like the Mk1 and Mk2 had!)

 

The same annoys me - always compared to an Octavia which has a Huuuge boot, although without the adjustable floor, and retractable luggage net the Corolla comes with. Come to think of it, the Corolla is a much better spec’d car as standard. Everything is an option with Skoda! 
 

The ‘premium’ offerings in this segment - BMW 3 series & Merc C class have much smaller boots than the Corolla TS, yet this shortcoming is never mentioned - you can tell I have an issue with car journalism 😂

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Car journalists are often paid clowns that make money form what they talk before anything else, even those who knows about cars are still putting business  first truth second. I only watch to spend time and having a laugh 😂, helpful things comes from independent guys who has experience both professional and life’s and don’t worry to say what they know and think about it. 👌

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I don’t generally read the car press, much like I don’t read most journalism. I have a news source I trust.

 I did read various reviews about the car I ordered before going for the test drive, though. Specialist consumer press journalists are often accused of writing top reviews for mediocre products.

(OTOH, journalists, or at least one journalist, make pretty bad politicians!)

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For me, having had turbo cars in recent years, the performance of the 1.8 is just about acceptable.  I would like to have bought a 2.0 but I couldn't live with the reduced boot space.  I need room to stack suitcases and folding down the back seat is not an option for me as I like them to be out of view when I am parked .  

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