Jump to content
Do Not Sell My Personal Information


toyota corolla hybrid, is it all that?


Recommended Posts

Question, Why should people buy a 20k+ vehicle in 2019-21 and have to worry about whether your latest pride and joy will start after being left for a few days in cold weather, Frostyballs link to toyota uk regarding "what to do in current lockdown conditions" i spent 30 minutes reading all 240+ toyota owners with hybrid problems with flat auxiliary batteries... ie 12v, i suggest anyone interested in this subject to have a look you will be astounded, These are letters to toyota uk and the answers back from toyota uk. ps these posts go back to a year before COVID.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the UK the first Covid lockdown began on 23rd March 2020 and ran through until 4th July 2020.

The topic on Toyota UK Blog dates back to April 2020, and that was when it was originally posted on Toyota Owners Club (it is a pinned topic in General Discussions). The comments from owners on Toyota UK Blog also go back to April 2020, and there no owner comments on this topic before April 2020.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

left for few days not a problem, left for few weeks and infrequent use before that or only used for short trips, add cold temperatures and then it’s a problem ., this applies not only for hybrid but for all cars. Battery physics. , smaller 12v batteries in hybrids perhaps easier to die. General rule for all devices including vehicles that uses batteries of any type, you have to use them otherwise Battery will deplete and dies. E scooters manual suggest if you don’t use the scooter charge every two months to prevent dead Battery, Toyota recommended to keep in ready mode, or trickle charger if you don’t use , otherwise nothing to worry about. Toyota hybrids are probably the most relaxed cars not only to drive but to own and maintain. 👍🚗

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Toyota can't be blamed for not anticipating the pandemic and consequent lockdown. As Tony has posted all rechargeable batteries lose charge over time and any Battery dependant device will have problems if left for an unusually long time. As another example the Honda Jazz is known to have Battery issues that afflict owners who make infrequent and short trips. Rather ironic given its target market. Several of my late Dad's friends have Jazz and all had bought dash mounted solar chargers long before the pandemic.

The smaller 12v Battery in the hybrid might make them a bit more susceptible than most and is exacerbated by the keyless entry which means some struggle to operate the locks. However a flat Battery after being left a few weeks and/or only making short trips is a common issue for all modern cars.

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

you are all missing the point, firstly read the letters first you will understand its not a covid problem its  a poor Battery design, there is loads of people on here talking about Battery charges on a new car just because they left it for two days do me a favor, i have been driving 40 years i have owned a landcruiser and 2 hilux's and loads of other models, i have a citroen berlingo van 10 years old, i put a new Battery in it 3 years ago and i can leave it outside in all weathers for a month while i went away, and guess what it started, oh and by the way my friend is a toyota tech and he is agrement with me on this issue, i loved the short test drive i had before xmas of the touring sport hybrid its a cracking drive, but dont tell me this is a covid issue its a design of the Battery issue.

Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, hayalgoparati1878 said:

these posts go back to a year before COVID.

First of all, part of your original post is wrong. The Toyota UK blog topic was posted in April last year (2020), and none of the owner comments on that topic pre-date Covid as you stated.

Members haven't said the issue is due to Covid. However, the Covid lockdowns have highlighted that little use combined with short runs (typical of what happened during lockdowns) could result in the 12v Battery becoming flat. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Im curious about this issue, cant remember the last time I had a problem with a 12v car Battery, bike batteries is another story. Its rare that my cars sit for 2 days let alone a week or more and as Im key worker status ive not been sat at home much.

But just out of curiosity I thought I would go and put a multi meter on my Corolla 12v Battery, car is a week old and has been used every day since collection.

So, its showing 12.5V, which if it was my bike or my last car could be a problem, but as this Battery doesnt need to turn a starter motor its probably fine. Im still a bit surprised though that after all the use its had its not nearer 12.7 or 12.8.

For comparison my Motor Bike will still show 12.9v or even 13v after a week of no use, but it is an AGM type which tends to show higher voltage.

 

PS: Ok, just checked owners manual and Toyota say a reading as low as 12V is acceptable

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

No problems with my car either, 10 years old now and been of the road for up to 4 weeks in summer without touching it, start first time after that, winters before up to a week without use again no problems, last lockdown survived and I hope this will do too, I do keep in ready mode and drive around twice a week, the car likes it. For everyone who has a hybrid or thinking of buying one remember,  if you keep it without use for weeks not only 12v Battery will suffer but your brakes too, they will excessively rust and replacement every 2-3 years will be imminent but if you drive it regularly you may never need to replace any part of your car for lifetime., just a regular service and consumables like wipers, tyres and filters. 👍

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Remember leaving my Auris for over a week at an Airport car park and started first time. It was in the Summer admittedly but never left it standing in cold weather for period of time.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

My 2020 TS 2.0lt  stood unused outside for 2 weeks during the recent spell. Started without any trouble. It rarely does more than a 7 mile journey these days. Keyless entry has worked every time. No trouble at night when headlights on either. 

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

I haven't driven regularly since I got the Corolla in September, it has often been sat for over a week and up to two. I've not had a problem with the Battery but my brakes have often been stuck and then noisy in use. My Jaguar F-Type battery went flat in just over a week in the first lockdown and I had to start it with one of those little lithium ion jump packs. Speaking of whether a Corolla hybrid is all that, I was driving it today for the first time in a week or so and I was thinking it's the best car I've ever had, it's just so well suited for the roads I drive and the lifestyle I lead. I never need more power (it's the 1.8) and it rides and handles beautifully, the seats and driving position are great (I'm 194cm tall) and I think it looks great even though I only have the Icon Tech, it's still got nice bodywork and decent alloys.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

My Fathers Kia Ceed 19 plate turbo diesal has not been used for the last 2 weeks. Went to use it to get his Covid jab this morning. Guess what. Flat Battery. Had to use my Corolla instead.  My neighbour's BMW is used daily to go 2 miles to work and back. Went to use it in the snow last weekend. Guess what. Flat Battery

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, bigblock said:

My Fathers Kia Ceed 19 plate turbo diesal has not been used for the last 2 weeks. Went to use it to get his Covid jab this morning. Guess what. Flat battery. Had to use my Corolla instead.  My neighbour's BMW is used daily to go 2 miles to work and back. Went to use it in the snow last weekend. Guess what. Flat battery. 

Absolutely normal occurrence 👍, during lockdowns I often ride a scooter in my local area and I have seen many cars with engines running, some drivers stay inside cars, some been outside chatting to neighbours from distance, I guess exactly to prevent dead Battery. I bet on that: if we go to a car dealer especially used cars more than a half of the cars in the forecourt will not start, no matter engine types, age, hybrid or whatever as long as they been there for over 2 weeks. 
I watch the weather, if shows negative temperatures overnight and my car been unused for over 3-4 days, I just start and leave it running for an hour so I know I have done my bit to preserve the Battery and save some surprises next time I need the car. 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to add, my Battery will drop below12v after 2 days.  It has only failed to start well over that period.  I have only just acquired a voltmeter so I don't know the failed to start voltages.  I suggested elsewhere here that a Battery starter/Compressor might be considered to re energise the 12v Battery sufficient to activate the car systems.  If leaving it at an airport or such for 14 days plus is a concern then that might be a good investment.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, FROSTYBALLS said:

...the Covid lockdowns have highlighted that little use combined with short runs (typical of what happened during lockdowns) could result in the 12v battery becoming flat. 

I think that's the key point here.

My 1.8 Excel HB, acquired new last June, is parked for days on end. Since December, I drive it only 2-3 times a week on short (5-10 miles) local journeys. I try to take it for a longer run at high speeds (20 miles or so, motorway when possible) at weekends although it's a struggle to do that with the current lockdown restrictions. In these circumstances, I'm less concerned about low MPG and more EV than I would otherwise be - major focus is giving the car some exercise and keeping the Battery up. 

So far so good, no Battery issues at all, helped by gentle driving and minimal use of things that consume lots of Battery energy. And MPG is still good, currently showing 62.1 (down from 66.4 in October).

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Luke, unlike a conventional ICE with an alternator, speed is not a factor for the hybrid.  

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Roy124 said:

Luke, unlike a conventional ICE with an alternator, speed is not a factor for the hybrid.  

Thanks, Roy, I understand that. What I'm concerned with is giving the car some actual use including a high-speed run. At this time, I'm not much concerned about great MPG although it's nice when there is.

Toyota posted on their blog last year about hybrid Battery care, some good tips for the lockdown. Noting that they actually say you don't need to take the car for a drive at all as long as you start the engine and run it for a while now and again.

https://blog.toyota.co.uk/coronavirus-toyota-hybrid-car-maintenance

That's fine but I prefer to take it for a spin. I like driving it!

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Luke, it is a totally different sort of car.  As you learn more you realise just how different it is.  There is so much to learn and I guess Toyota don't want to scare non-techies off.  You could easily use 3-4 hours of lessons.  I see its most economical speed is around 62.  No longer a boy racer, I am happy to set the ACC to 60 or 65 (60 mph true) and allow it to take station with the trucks in lane 1.  The high speeders in lane 2 rarely pull far ahead (A1 - 2 lanes).  On a proper 3 lane then I would go faster in lane 2 and leave the trucks in lane 1.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Driving is always better than idling, for all components and especially the brakes. 👍 I do the same but try to avoid motorways as too much of salt on them. 👍

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, TonyHSD said:

Driving is always better than idling, for all components and especially the brakes. 👍 I do the same but try to avoid motorways as too much of salt on them. 👍

With you on that re salt, Tony! Where I live outside Newbury it's a mix of semi-urban and completely rural, farmland and woodlands. A handful of good A-roads with lots of Bs and rural lanes. We're lucky that all As and many Bs are properly salted - of course with the worry about too much of it. The M4 crosses east to west; unless it's very wet with loads of spray thrown up, I think it's probably better for the car in that higher traffic volume at higher speeds must spread the salted stuff better than lower volume traffic and speeds on As and Bs. I have no actual proof of that, though 😊

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, MarcusWatson said:

I've not had a problem with the battery but my brakes have often been stuck and then noisy in use.

Mark, I'd not set the electronic handbrake at all, just place the car in park. I've been doing this with mine since the first frost when the rear brakes became stuck to the discs. No more of that now, nor the noise in use.

Edit: The Toyota blog post referenced earlier actually references the parking point:

Quote

It can be beneficial to leave the vehicle with the parking brake disengaged to prevent the brakes from binding, but only do this if you are certain the car is on level terrain and isn’t going to move. Ensure the transmission is set to ‘P’ for park and place wedges or chocks, if you have them, under the wheels.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Me too.  I am sure there is a reason but even in the Mercedes it was always a surprise after someone else parked the car.

If I stop in front of my garage, unstrap, and then drive in, no problem.  If the car has the brake Hold option engaged and I unstrap the car will not come out of auto park until I strap in again.  This car is almost all 'drive-by-wire' and is a brain game guessing what you can do.

Come the darker nights and wet too I had no idea how to operate the wipers or lights.  It was easier to ignore it and let the automatics take care of it. Charging up behind a someone slowing for traffic lights has the Mrs bracing for impact but the car has it all under control.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Roy124 said:

Charging up behind a someone slowing for traffic lights has the Mrs bracing for impact but the car has it all under control.

Why would you 'charge up' behind someone slowing for traffic lights? That's bad driving. It's adding unnecessary wear and tear to the brakes, reduces your ability to handle the unexpected and wastes fuel.

If you can see traffic lights ahead that you will have to stop for then lift off. That's far more fuel efficient, reduces (possibly eliminates if your timing is good) brake wear and means that if something unexpected happens you still have all of your braking force available to help deal with it.

It also encourages you to have a far greater awareness of the traffic and road conditions which further improves overall safety.

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Luke717 said:

Mark, I'd not set the electronic handbrake at all, just place the car in park. I've been doing this with mine since the first frost when the rear brakes became stuck to the discs. No more of that now, nor the noise in use.

Edit: The Toyota blog post referenced earlier actually references the parking point:

 

Thanks Luke, this is a good tip, I'm going to take your advice and do this from now on.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, AndrueC said:

Why would you 'charge up' behind someone slowing for traffic lights? That's bad driving. It's adding unnecessary wear and tear to the brakes, reduces your ability to handle the unexpected and wastes fuel.

If you can see traffic lights ahead that you will have to stop for then lift off. That's far more fuel efficient, reduces (possibly eliminates if your timing is good) brake wear and means that if something unexpected happens you still have all of your braking force available to help deal with it.

It also encourages you to have a far greater awareness of the traffic and road conditions which further improves overall safety.

Oh I agree, 'charging up' was a figure of speech and my wife's perception.  What I am saying is the car does everything immaculately with the ACC maintaining its station on the car in front.  It then smoothly accelerates as the traffic moves off.  Not all the time of course but a delight when the timing works.

My wife is not a good passenger, she visibly braces or some times says LOOK which has me doing a quick scan before braking when it was a bird or something that caught her eye.

No the bigger problem I find when approaching standing traffic at lights on a downhill is the car behind.  I lift off and let the Battery recharge and the car slow down.  They however are intent on maintaining speed before a brake test on arrival at the hold up.  Maths at school was never their strong point.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...




Forums


News


Membership