Jump to content
Do Not Sell My Personal Information


12v battery maintenance


 Share

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, Roy124 said:

Tony, have you look to see if there is a date? 

I didn’t see any date on. On Amazon website says first available date February 2020. 👍

Link to comment
Share on other sites


7 minutes ago, ACameron said:

That is fine if you want to spend £99.  You dont need anything that powerful to kick into life a Toyota hybrid.  Notice it will start a 6 litre petrol or a 3 litre diesel, you are not even turning an engine in a Toyota hybrid...... you are firing up a computer and a few other important bits, none of which needs anything so beefy.  Save money and get something for around £40-£50

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Catlover said:

That is fine if you want to spend £99.  You dont need anything that powerful to kick into life a Toyota hybrid.  Notice it will start a 6 litre petrol or a 3 litre diesel, you are not even turning an engine in a Toyota hybrid...... you are firing up a computer and a few other important bits, none of which needs anything so beefy.  Save money and get something for around £40-£50

👍

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Catlover said:

That is fine if you want to spend £99.  You dont need anything that powerful to kick into life a Toyota hybrid.  Notice it will start a 6 litre petrol or a 3 litre diesel, you are not even turning an engine in a Toyota hybrid...... you are firing up a computer and a few other important bits, none of which needs anything so beefy.  Save money and get something for around £40-£50

Agree though I got a powerful one https://gooloo.uk/collections/titan-series/products/gp2000-red?variant=39745794998351 for £52

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Spo2 said:

Thats fine, Sol, if you can get a £129.99 unit for £52.  Just show what profit margins there are.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Just returned from 14 day holiday. Left car on my drive with the AA Solar Panel model AA4185 connected via OBD connector. 12 volt Battery at start of hols was 12.4 volts. 

Checked again on returning before starting the car, and level was 12.1 volts. So, with the aid of the panel it dropped only 0.3 volts in that time. I guess the panel is worth using in that case,  and at only £24 is worth the money.

I wonder how low the Battery needs to go before we start getting key entry probs etc. ?

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I've just collected a 2yr old Corolla hybrid, dealer drove it from the back, we got the paperwork done and sat there to do my settings etc and.....12v Battery wouldn't even engage the the parking break. They replaced it foc rather than charge it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Toyota guidance as follows:

Toyota hybrids generally contain two batteries: a 12-volt Battery (which powers systems such as the headlamps and audio) and a high-voltage hybrid system Battery (which supplies the power to start the combustion engine and drive the electric motors).

The simplest way to maintain charge in both of these batteries is to simply go through the normal start procedure: press the ‘Start’ button with your foot on the brake and ensure the ‘Ready’ light is illuminated on the dashboard.

We recommend you put the car in ‘Ready’ mode for about 60 minutes before switching it off again and repeat the process at least once a week.

With regards to the information above, I'm interested to know what is the charging rate from the hybrid system Battery to the auxiliary battery whilst in ‘Ready’ mode.

(Toyota Corolla Hybrid 1.8 owner)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My understanding is that it charges as fast as it needs to. Frankly, I don't bother about it. Just drive the car normally and it takes care of itself.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

This with the ready mode for 30 or 60 min need to be done only if you don’t drive the car at all or you do very infrequently, otherwise as mentioned, just drive as usual . 👍

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Once again left car for eleven day, with solar panel connected via obd port. Battery at start measured 12.1 volts. After 11 days, measured 11.94 volts. So, lost only 0.16 volts with solar panel connected.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just as an aside to the above, yesterday I had to wait for nearly 2.5 hours for my wife to finish work As I decided not to bother driving home, just to turn round an hour later. I sat in the car and, whilst reading a book, sat there with some music videos playing via a USB stick. After about two hours, I decided that the weather was rather hot, (a novelty here in Ireland), so went into my wifes shop and bought an ice cream. I returned to the locked car and got in as normal. I went to turn the music on again and got a message saying 'Parking brake inoperative', or something like that. I pressed the start button and - nothing. Then the dash lit up for a second, then I got the parking brake message, along with 'Forward Collision Alert' inoperative. Help thinks I, maybe the car has got too hot. I then brought up the app on my phone that tells me the state of the Battery, (got the unit following a recommendation on the forum a few months ago). The result showed the Battery at just under 8 volts and a low percentage, (forget what)! So I went to the boot and got out the 'Noco' boost thingy, (another recommendation from the forum), connected it up and got the car started. Phew! We drove home, a distance of about 20 miles and I left the car switched on in my driveway for an hour. The Battery monitor was then showing 100%. On checking this morning, it was still showing 100%. So, thanks to the members who recommended the above items, along with the AA Solar charger, which I also bought. I just never realised how much power playing music videos takes, although I did get the car switching off twice "to save battery". We live and learn - if the occasion where I have to twiddle my thumbs for a couple of hours occurs again, I will know to turn the power on every now and then.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a 20 watt solar panel connected directly to Battery it keeps it at 100% full charged.

I have noted that no charger at this rated wattage is avaiable for connecting via ODB port so mayby MFG Ring know somthink that I dont about pluging into this port.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

David,

If you want to sit in the car listening to music it is best to leave the car in Ready Mode.  The hybrid Battery will then charge the 12v Battery if the voltage in that starts to drop.  Then, if the hybrid Battery depletes the engine will start (but only for a short period) to recharge the hybrid battery.  

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/4/2022 at 12:37 PM, Tel_man said:

Once again left car for eleven day, with solar panel connected via obd port. Battery at start measured 12.1 volts. After 11 days, measured 11.94 volts. So, lost only 0.16 volts with solar panel connected.

On previous occasions, how much has the Battery drained WITHOUT the solar charger connected ?
 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A further feature of Ready mode is you can open the windows at the press of a button as it is already in Ready mode.

While David learnt about chargers and jumpers it the forum he missed the bit about Ready Mode 🙂

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lesson learned, and thanks for sharing your story. I am sure it will be helpful to many and especially those who are new to a Toyota hybrids. 🪫👍

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, dannyboy413 said:

The result showed the battery at just under 8 volts and a low percentage, (forget what)!

There is some interesting information here... and these are just my thoughts...

Taken at face value and 8 volts is uncharted territory. You will find slightly different values quoted for what constitutes a healthy but full discharged Battery and its in the 11.5 volt region for the Battery chemistries involved. So 8 volts is way beyond just being flat.

 

21 hours ago, dannyboy413 said:

We drove home, a distance of about 20 miles and I left the car switched on in my driveway for an hour.

So lets say 1.5 to 2 hours in some mode that should charge the Battery.

 

21 hours ago, dannyboy413 said:

The battery monitor was then showing 100%. On checking this morning, it was still showing 100%.

A 100% of what? That is the big big question here.

As I say, these are my thoughts but I can not see a discharged  and otherwise healthy battery being able to be fully charged in that time. The energy input would be enormous and that battery would get hot. It would also need a managed charge voltage (higher than normal) to force the current into the battery... and so...  

I assume the percentage readout is based on terminal voltage of the battery. That means a 1Ah, 10Ah or 100Ah battery that was fully charged would always show 100% because the terminal voltage is at the level corresponding to a fully charged battery. The percentage readout doesn't know the capacity of the battery, it just looks at voltage and calculates a state of charge from that. Think of a 10 year old laptop or phone battery. It might show 100% and fully charged but only runs the thing for a few minutes. 

So I'm honestly thinking that the battery in this case is way down on capacity. What I would do next is a known discharge test by turning on known consumers and seeing how the battery holds up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Mooly

That's getting a bit beyond me, especially for a Sunday evening. 😁

The Battery monitor I referred to is this one -

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B08VHMJYXY/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o09_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Once installed, I downloaded the app. I have no idea whether it is any good, or accurate, but it is what I have so it gives me a consistent experience and does send me a warning if the Battery condition goes lower than a set percentage, (but I missed the warning on Friday!).

As regards having the car in 'Ready Mode', I was fully aware of that fact, but not for one minute did I think sat there for 2.5 hours watching videos would deplete the Battery so much. Still, we live and learn.  Incidentally, I have just got in the car - untouched from Friday. It started no problem and I had to press the accelerator to make the petrol engine fire up. Hopefully all is well with the world again. 🙂

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mooly, as it happens, my Battery indicated 8v and failed to start Ready mode after 8 days.  It was certainly no where near this on days 6 and 7.  I don't have the details now and clearly I could not have tried earlier for I would have had to had tests at day 6, wait for 7 days and try again, then finally at day 22.

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Talking about the NOCO Boost / charger (sort of) I normally keep mine in the car all the time, but during this hot weather I remove it when the car is not in use due to the extreme heat build up.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, dannyboy413 said:

That's getting a bit beyond me, especially for a Sunday evening. 😁

The battery monitor I referred to is this one -

That type of meter tries to deduce charge level from the voltage but it assumes a healthy Battery for interpretation of the results. In other words if it shows 80% then it assumes 80% of whatever the Battery capacity is supposed to be.

If that Battery is deteriorated (say the capacity has fallen from 35Ah to 8Ah) it will still always show 100% when the voltage across the battery is at the value that corresponds to a fully charged battery. The capacity however is not there. 

An analogy... a 1 litre, 10 litre and 100 litre tank will all show 100% full when they are full and all would show 50% when half full. The 100 litre tank could be thought of as a new battery, the 50 litre as the same battery after a few years and the 1 litre as a failed battery. As the battery deteriorates its capacity falls.

 

9 hours ago, Roy124 said:

Mooly, as it happens, my battery indicated 8v and failed to start Ready mode after 8 days.  It was certainly no where near this on days 6 and 7. 

As the battery becomes fully discharged the terminal voltage will start to fall ever more rapidly. So it might have held up for 6 to 7 days at which point it is 'empty' and then after that the terminal voltage drops off a cliff.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share






×
×
  • Create New...




Forums


News


Membership