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Toyota "quality" or lack of?


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My Yaris was serviced and MOTd yesterday. 29900 miles from new. I thought that the Yaris was "bullet proof" if looked after? That is not relevant here because many parts are not serviceable, the so-called "sealed for life". An odd statement really because it only means the life of the component.

It failed on a rear wheel bearing. That should not happen at that mileage. A really logical design too, the complete hub has to be changed rather than a properly engineered part where the actual bearing(s) may be changed.

I was aware of a possible issue, because of a humming noise at certain speeds, and did mention that when booking in.

A bit disappointing to say the least!

A strange advisory too. "Front offside tyre valve rubber deteriorated". i.e. the rubber covering from the wheel rim to valve cap threads.

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2 minutes ago, mrpj said:

My Yaris was serviced and MOTd yesterday. 29900 miles from new. I thought that the Yaris was "bullet proof" if looked after? That is not relevant here because many parts are not serviceable, the so-called "sealed for life". An odd statement really because it only means the life of the component.

It failed on a rear wheel bearing. That should not happen at that mileage. A really logical design too, the complete hub has to be changed rather than a properly engineered part where to actual bearing may be changed.

I was aware of a possible issue, because of a humming noise at certain speeds, and did mention that when booking in.

A bit disappointing to say the least!

A strange advisory too. "Front offside tyre valve rubber deteriorated". i.e. the rubber covering from the wheel rim to valve cap threads.

How long have you had the car Peter?

Who told you that "sealed for life" meant the life of the component?

29,900 miles is rather low for a Bearing to go ,even though the car is 7 years old, I agree.

Was it serviced by Toyota Main Dealer ?

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That is a low mileage for a wheel bearing to fail have you driven through deep water recently as it’s possible for water to enter the bearings and cause failure, sealed for life generally means you can’t lubricate or change grease or Oil however it can be done if you are conversant with car mechanicals.

I would write to Toyota about it they may offer you some money towards repairs if you have had it dealer serviced.

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This isn't what you were asking, but this YouTube video shows what is involved in changing that bearing (on an earlier model, perhaps).

Chatty, entertaining mechanic, too!

20+ years ago, I used to visit an SKF bearing production site in the UK.  Back then, as a company, they always seemed to be playing 'catch-up' with the  competition-from-Japan's production tolerances.  I wonder how that's been completely resolved?   The Japanese investment in the latest production machines was a big part of the issue.

At the time, some of the French-made SKF bearings, fresh from the warehouse, failed SKF's own quality tests!  Eeek! 

I should add, the UK factory's output was to a very high standard, their skills were used to troubleshoot 'problem' overseas production lines - ones that were beyond some other country's plants to knock into shape themselves.

All just ancient history now, of course.

 

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The rear bearings are a complete unit due to the ABS ring, a bearing only change can be done but it's not worth the labour or the risk of cracking the ABS Ring

it's usually the O/S bearings that take the abuse too, hitting a pothole is enough to trigger a bearing to fail

 

Does the car have TPMS the oem TP sensors have metal stems

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7 hours ago, flash22 said:

The rear bearings are a complete unit due to the ABS ring, a bearing only change can be done but it's not worth the labour or the risk of cracking the ABS Ring

it's usually the O/S bearings that take the abuse too, hitting a pothole is enough to trigger a bearing to fail

 

Does the car have TPMS the oem TP sensors have metal stems

That'a bit worrying, i hit potholes almost everytime i use my car - there's too many to safely avoid.

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Michael, you must report the existence of potholes to your local Authority via its website. It will then become liable for damage caused if it fails to act upon your notifications.

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Thanks for all the replies. I only mentioned "sealed for life" as that is what many things are now and it could mislead some.

The car has been serviced on time, 5 years by Toyota, the last two an independent. That's not relevant though, because wheel bearings are not a serviceable item only a MOT check or maybe part of a routine service check. It has been "humming" for some time. I didn't initially think bearing noise because of the mileage. Thought it might be a sporty exhaust noise.:biggrin:

It's the nearside, rear which seems to be where all the manholes, grids and potholes seem to be located locally!

Bog standard valve stems - not the originals. Not seen that as part of the MOT before?

I don't expect anything from Toyota, even if it had a full dealer service history. I might just fire off a whinge though. I've never, in the number of years of motoring (too many to reveal) and many cars, had a wheel bearing fail at any mileage. As comparisons, my daughters own a Vauxhall Zafira, 87000 miles, 10 years old and a Ford Focus, 48000 miles, 7 years old. No hint of wheel bearing failure with those. Plus my own 59 years old Morris Minor, 166000 miles still with it's original wheel bearings, they don't make them like they used to in that context!

I just wanted to have a little vent and get it off my chest on here.

 

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Our Yaris rear wheel bearing driver side went at only 42k miles although on an 04 car. I was stunned at the OEM part cost of £357 inc VAT but managed to buy a pattern spare inc ABS for about £35, although I had to send a couple back before getting one with no play.

I came across the valve stem thing a few years ago on my Avensis. MOT man said both rear valve stems were perished (tyres only 2 years old) and needed replacing so had them done for £30 the pair. The next year test they said exactly the same thing when I pointed out they had replaced them the previous year-they said they must be faulty and would replace they free of charge but they actually just cleaned them up. Sound like a common way of winkling extra money out of customers, I stopped using that garage!

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For the avoidance of doubt and misunderstanding the term "sealed for life" has been attributed to Manufacturers in relation to Transmission Oil.

Life refers to the production life of the model, normally 6/7 years.

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Wheel bearings goes bad because of the water and bad roads mainly or if been regularly overloaded. I had to replace mine at 136000 and not because been that bad but I had found a good price Blue print which are as good as oem parts but in the blue box. Btw these new type all together bearings and hubs are way easier to replace than older type, but will depend how much rust has build up around. Here some video what kills wheel bearings the most, enjoy. 

 

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Did mine a couple of years ago, 80k miles.Rear is a easy to replace as it's a complete unit, bolt off, bolt on, replacing the fronts would require a press plus longer to do. Source mine from a bearing specialist in Sheffield, think it was about £100. As far as Toyota build quality, unfortunatly it can't be responsable for every outide sourced part, when generally they don't fail as yours has, luck of the draw.

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18 hours ago, sproutdreamer said:

I was stunned at the OEM part cost of £357 inc VAT

I know! I have been quoted £233 inc. VAT by a Toyota dealer. Maybe not selling many due to the extortionate pricing?

They are as cheap as £30 on the old evilbay. No thanks. 6 months life if optimistic. Probably o.k. if moving the car on.

My only concern re d.i.y. is if it is seized in the axle.

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8 hours ago, mrpj said:

I know! I have been quoted £233 inc. VAT by a Toyota dealer. Maybe not selling many due to the extortionate pricing?

They are as cheap as £30 on the old evilbay. No thanks. 6 months life if optimistic. Probably o.k. if moving the car on.

My only concern re d.i.y. is if it is seized in the axle.

Yes they are, prepare for heating up, hammering and wd-40 few cans, not easy to get them out because of the rust., it’s like cutting a metal weld. , front ones tend to be worse actually. 

2FE01436-94DA-4CC4-83EE-4E0BCCB243DB.jpeg

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Does anybody know the correct torque setting for the four hub assembly bolts? Thanks.

Various figures quoted on t'internet!

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The trick to removing the rear hub is to slghtly loosen the 4 hub securing bolts and then with a socket on the bolt head use a short socket extension to hammer on with a lump hammer which will loosen the hub ok. Some of the hubs have the bolt head to the outside and some to the inside but the procedure is the same. Perhaps a french/japanese manufacturing difference?

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Thanks Bob. That looks a bit high, but I'll take your word for it.:laugh:

Keith, that method should work with the bolt through from the back and into a threaded hub fixing flange. I've seen use of hydraulic power steering too rather than a lump hammer! I can't see how it would with the bolts through a clearance hole in the flange and into the threaded axle flange?

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On 2/22/2021 at 3:03 PM, sproutdreamer said:

Peter - yes I think you are right, I was making an assumption about the bolt heads to the outside. Apology for talking through my a.....!

Thanks Keith. I do that myself, constantly!

Managed to change it. Not too stuck. But who devised the plug for the wheel sensor? No way to release the locking tab and I had to lever it off with a screwdriver. There is a clipped on protective cover and advice is not to remove that because the wiring is really thin, flimsy and easily damaged. As far as I could determine there is no way to release the plug correctly without removing that cover. I therefore had to don the straw boater hat and white striped apron.

If anyone knows different then please advise, because I might change the other anyway, and prefer not to use a screwdriver as a lever, thanks.

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I’ve been thinking that I might have to consider changing the rear wheel bearings for a while but it passed its MOT this week at 151,209 miles this week without comment. Every time I jack up a corner and spin a wheel I can’t detect any roughness.

I did get an advisory a few years ago for valve stems: I had some metal valve caps that used to corrode and had gripped the stem with pliers while I undid the caps with a spanner. This caused some tears in the rubber on the valve stem. The tyres were changed before the next test so the problem went away; the metal caps went in the bin.

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