Jump to content
Do Not Sell My Personal Information


Advice for buying a used 2019 TS hybrid


Recommended Posts

Curious what wear and tear owners (things to look out for) have experienced with this car that can cause problems later on. We're looking at buying a Silver 2019 TS hybrid this weekend (31,000 miles, previously used as a taxi) and want to be sure we ask all the right questions as this is our first car we're looking at buying from an independent dealer. 

So far we've been told to check to see if anything under the hood looks newer than the rest, meaning things have been replaced. Other things we've been told are to let go of the steering wheel to see if the steering pulls to one side, but figured there might be some more things we should look out for?

Thanks in advance. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, if you don’t understand cars best to book someone to inspect the car for you , mechanically at only 31000 miles this car most likely has nothing changed under the bonnet except Oil and filters. Since been used as taxi very important to check for body repair on every panel of the car and undercarriage, interior checks on everything, folding seats, seat belts, if anything broken or damaged. Service history, the car should have 3 services done at 10,20 and 30k miles. All general checks and tests before purchasing a used car. I am not aware of anything that is problematic on these cars, mileage is low and if been taken good care of this car should be good for many more trouble free miles.
Good luck 👍

Link to post
Share on other sites

As it has been used a taxi, check the service history - has it been serviced according to Toyota's requirements. As the car is still within the new car warranty, if a warranty claim is made which is dependent on correct servicing, it is important to be sure that servicing has been adhered to, otherwise the warranty claim may be refused.

Check also whether magnetic signs have been used on the car, either on the doors or the roof, and scratched the paintwork.

Servicing is due every 12 months or 10,000 miles ,whichever occurs first. Intermediate services are due at 12 months/10,000 miles, 3 years/30,000 miles, etc, and Full services at 2 years/20,000 miles, 4 years/40,000 miles, etc.

So a 2019 car which has done 31,000 miles, should have been serviced on the mileage basis and should have had two Intermediate services (10,000 and 30,000) and a Full service at 20,000 miles. Has the car had the 30,000 mile service done, or will it be done before sale?? Is the service book up to date. Where has the servicing been done - independent garage or Toyota dealer? DIY servicing invalidates the warranty.

Toyota dealer servicing (hybrid electric service) includes a check on the health of the hybrid Battery, and when the car is over five years of age and outside the new car warranty, provided the car is serviced by annually by Toyota, the hybrid electric service can extend the warranty on the hybrid Battery for 1 year/10,000 miles. The hybrid Battery warranty can be extended for up to 15 years - however cars used as taxis can only have the extension for 5 years.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the above sound advice.  I would also ensure that there is no outstanding finance on the vehicle.  You would be amazed at the number of people stung this way.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If the car has build in GPS, are the maps up to date? You can update to Google Maps, have that been done? 

If the service has been done by another garage than Toyota, it's very important that 0w16 or 0w20 Oil has been used. Some garages uses 5w30 to cut costs..

Finally the testdrive... No funny sounds, no rattle, not a thing. Does the hybrid system work normal? Charge, discharge, turning of engine at lower speeds, downhill, rolling....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Good idea to check the locking wheel nut is present and as mentioned above a hpi check crucial you never know ut could have been a write off at some point or finance owing. 

How many owners? If it was prereg then taxi and now you that's 3 owners in such a short time but not an issue if you plan to keep the car long term. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Call me sceptical but my biggest question would by be why is a ex taxi being sold with such low age mileage? Usually Taxi are leased from a third party and run until they are no longer viable.

If it was leased and no longer required it would go back to lease company or TP owner, why is such a young low mileage car in an independent dealer? lots of alarm bells. 

Definitely get an independent inspection with guarantee's as to the cars condition including HPi/insurance checks confirming that the car was not written off, repaired and is now up for sale, as a write off has no manufacturers warranty  

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

31,000 miles is not a lot, but it is for a car max 2 years old. Average mileage I reckon is 8,000 per year, so 31k is high.  This is your first car, right. You know very little mechanically, right. If you getting serious about this car, it would be right to get an independent survey done by a qualified examiner. It will cost you but it would be well worth it.                  
I presume it’s a hybrid car, and not the 1.2 petrol??? The 1.2 was only released for a shortish period of time then ceased due to low sales. The Toyota hybrid is very popular, the hybrid mechanics very reliable, you will love driving it.            
However, you have had some good advice from the other TOC members, very experienced guys. I wouldn’t want to be buying this car if I was in your situation.  You not said if the car being sold is at a Toyota dealer, an independent main dealer, just a “normal” dealer, some back street garage, of privately. All signs to me you should NOT even go and look at this, it might stand there all clean and shiny, and get a talky sales person (they usually are), and you could well be persuaded to buy........ and regret it some time in the future.  
Plenty of other Toyota Corolla cars for sale. If the Corolla TS is the estate car then the wheelbase will be the same as a Toyota Prius Gen4 (all Prius are Hybrid). There is a recent thread on here suggesting due to the current market trends prices of used Prius have dropped. That would be a good alternative to get a Gen4.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would be concerned with the mileage (or lack of). Look for tell tale signs of excessive wear on the interior against the claimed mileage. Cars are still regularly clocked, especially ex-taxis. It's easy to do on cars that haven't reached their first MoT as there's no record on .gov of it's mileage. Also a HPI would not show any mileage discrepancies because it's not reached its first MoT and then been clocked. 

I would run a mile personally. But maybe I'm a synic?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Taxi's, as well as hire cars, have usually had multiple drivers.  Some taxis companies hot bed their cars to maximise their time on the road and to get their moneys worth from the car.  I've only once considered an ex-hire car, and that was from the main dealer that took it as a trade in, and it was seriously under book price being ex-hire.  Taxi mechanicals and especially interiors, by definition generally have a hard life compared to a 'one owner' car.  In your shoes I would check the asking price against dealer stock as a first step, and if that does not persuade you to think carefully at the very least I would get a 'proper' paid for inspection done (AA/RAC).  Buyer beware!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, here is my take on taxis, or ex-taxis, private hire cars.   I have bought 2 in the past. First was a Peugoet 05 diesel estate being sold privately, been used as primatily as an airport run. It had over 300,000 miles when I bought it and was only a few hundred pounds. Impressively, the owner had every invoice for every penny spent on it, together with a card system. The car had to be on the road to make its keep, that owner kept it on the road by every repair being done, and done quickly.                          

Second car was my first Prius, a 59 plate Gen3, bought with 105,000 on the clock. 50,000 put on the clock in it previous 2 years owned as a taxi (private hire car). Again, that owner had all his invoices nicely in order, and again, as the car was a money earner everything else was in order. I loved that Prius so much that just after 110,000 on the clock I traded it in for my current Gen4 Prius.

So subject to normal checks, ie seating, internal trim, tyres, mechanics etc I have no qualms about buying a taxi, BUT you need to know what you looking for and be prepared to walk away. 

In your situation, original poster, you be best walking away. If you cant do that you must get a professional to check it over throughly. Your choice of Toyota Hybrid (if it is an hybrid) is a good choice. Toyota have led the hybrid field for the last 20+ years and in my opinion still do.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was told the driver traded it in for a Lexus (I assume to get higher rates as a luxury driver). The dealer is an independent brick and mortar, found the car on Autotrader and it has passed the Autotrader checks but assume that’s based on an honesty policy do not to take them too seriously. So need to still check for things like clocking, and looking to get it inspected within the first 7 day return period (though I’m aware you need to be extra clear on the terms as they can wiggle their way out of taking the car back despite it being the law)
 

The car is the 1.8L Icon hybrid (no satnav, but we mainly use Apple CarPlay & Android Auto) with logbook and 1 previous owner (but as mentioned, taxi driver), will need to check if it was Uber or mini cab as that changes things in terms of being handed around and used by multiple drivers ( I realise in theory an Uber driver could also share a car around but we are trying to get a lot of car for what we are willing to spend). Have done loads of research on various models and the TS has the best combination of fuel economy, boot space, tech that comes standard and reliability (and looks the best in my opinion). 
 

I’m originally from California and we’ve always had either Toyota or Honda/Acura so going with what I know as a first car seems like a good shout (cars always lasted forever with lots of highway miles - Toyota Highlander, Acura RDX, Honda Pilot, Honda Fit or Honda Jazz in the UK, and Toyota Corolla Saloon). 
 

thanks for all the tips of what to look out for and definitely hear the people saying to be wary. 

 

Thanks again

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Christyens said:

we mainly use Apple CarPlay & Android Auto

As regards Apple Carplay/Android Auto, originally the Corolla didn't have either, although there was an update available from late last year. Check the multimedia has been updated. If not it can be updated by a Toyota dealer, either free with a service or at a cost if a standalone update.

Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, FROSTYBALLS said:

As regards Apple Carplay/Android Auto, originally the Corolla didn't have either, although there was an update available from late last year. Check the multimedia has been updated. If not it can be updated by a Toyota dealer, either free with a service or at a cost if a standalone update.

Yes I checked and it has been updated, also called Hills of Woodford Toyota and got a quote on what it would cost to be added just incase, they quoted £120. I really appreciate your note on what may nullify the warranty, I will be sure to be extra careful on checking the logbook and investigating where it has gotten its servicing done. By DIY do you mean as in the owner had a go at servicing it themself or does an independent mechanic count as "DIY" as far as Toyota is concerned?

Link to post
Share on other sites

In the EU and UK, legislation called Block Exemption allows new car warranties to remain valid if servicing is done either by the marque's dealer network or by a VAT registered garage, mechanic, etc. 

DIY servicing by the owner, a non-VAT registered mechanic or garage, are outside of the legislation so won't be considered as suitable servicing for warranty purposes. 

Parts used also have to be the equivalent standard to the manufacturer's original equipment parts. The easiest way of ensuring this equivalence is to buy service kits from one of the marque's dealers, etc.

If servicing is undertaken outside the dealer network and a warranty claim is subsequently made which is reliant on the correct servicing being undertaken (eg. correct service intervals, similar standard parts, correct spec of Oil, etc) the onus is on the owner to have proof that servicing has been done to the required level (eg receipts, outline of what was done at each service, etc).

Block exemption doesn't apply to extended warranties, and extended warranty companies can stipulate where servicing is done, etc.

The other thing to bear in mind is that warranty repairs under the new car warranty (ie. Toyota's 5 year/100,000 mile new car warranty) and any safety recalls will need to be done by the marque's dealer network.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Devon Aygo said:

Call me sceptical but my biggest question would by be why is a ex taxi being sold with such low age mileage? Usually Taxi are leased from a third party and run until they are no longer viable.

Coronavirus meant far fewer trips?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, 

there will be a lots of ex taxis (Auris, Corolla + Prius) for sale these days sold even privately as the trade is no more and will not recover anytime soon if recover at all. Some private hire drivers purchased their new cars directly from Toyota with personal finance from third party financial companies or banks and so the cars actually been paid off on paper at least. I just checked the actual car you are interested in and looks good to me, however if there are any defects or hidden things these can be eventually seen only in person. Any existing finance, Accident repair and clocked mileage are the three most important to double check before purchase. 
Good luck 👍

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not be surprised if a few taxi's are around for sale with business owners reducing their fleets etc. And they may well have lower mileage as we are into the second year of restrictions now. My Amazon book purchase came by taxi the other day, with a business card attached to the Amazon box, by one taxi owner managing to find another source of income during the current nightmare. 

Also, quite a few second hand vehicles 1 or 2 years old with very low mileage, I imagine.

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...




Forums


News


Membership