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What is E10 petrol


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On 8/31/2021 at 1:57 PM, FROSTYBALLS said:

 



Two quotes from the article relating to older vehicles:-
 
”If you put E10 fuel in an incompatible car it will still run, but seals, plastics and metals may be damaged over longer periods as a result of bioethanol's corrosive properties. It is a hygroscopic, which means it absorbs water from the atmosphere, leading to condensation in fuel tanks if the car remains unused for long periods of time.”
 
 
 Firstly, as the RAC Foundation points out, there could be as many as 600,000 vehicles on our roads that aren’t compatible with the fuel.

"Many of these are likely to be owned by those from lower income backgrounds and while it is welcome that E5 petrol is not being phased out altogether, owners of these vehicles will face higher fuel costs – and will also have to hunt out those forecourts that still sell E5.

"Some retailers will also not have the capacity to be able to provide both E5 and E10 fuels on forecourts, so the impact is likely to be most keenly felt by those with incompatible vehicles in rural areas.”

 

You should not put E10 in your lawn mover either, if you do you must drain the tank over the winter.

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NOTE, FOR ALL VEHICLE OWNERS, ESPECIALLY DURING PERIODS OF LOCKDOWN:-

 

 It is a hygroscopic, which means it absorbs water from the atmosphere, leading to condensation in fuel tanks if the car remains unused for long periods of time.”

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To be honest, if a car is vulnerable to E10 it's vulnerable to E5 as well, it will just take longer for any problems to manifest (Presumably by then it'd be outside the warranty period!)

E10 just accelerates any issues that can potentially occur.

I only mention this because if you accidentally put E10 in a car that isn't 'compatible' with it, as long as you use up the tank and go back to E5 or whatever, and not let it sit, there shouldn't be any lasting damage. As long as the fuel isn't sitting in the tank for ages then it will generally be okay - That's the trick.

 

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54 minutes ago, Cyker said:

To be honest, if a car is vulnerable to E10 it's vulnerable to E5 as well, it will just take longer for any problems to manifest (Presumably by then it'd be outside the warranty period!)

E10 just accelerates any issues that can potentially occur.

I only mention this because if you accidentally put E10 in a car that isn't 'compatible' with it, as long as you use up the tank and go back to E5 or whatever, and not let it sit, there shouldn't be any lasting damage. As long as the fuel isn't sitting in the tank for ages then it will generally be okay - That's the trick.

 

Agreed, although I have seen somewhere explaining that in some cars that are not designed to run on that fuel only once filled up with E10 is enough to trigger unstoppable reaction (corrosion) , therefore it is as bad as filling up with diesel, if that is true every owner should take extra care. 👍

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Yeah, I think that's for really old cars mainly - I'm told any car with a carburettor should avoid any long-term E-anything fuel use for the reasons you say!

That would match my observations of why so many classic car owner channels have been showing how to remove the ethanol from the petrol!

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