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Tyre Repair kit or space saver spare wheel


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Hi, I am purchasing a 2022 Corolla Icon Tech (1.8 Hatchback) and it comes with a Tyre Repair Kit as standard. However, I am think about using a spacesaver spare wheel instead. May I ask which one is better? Tyre Repair Kit or a spacesaver spare wheel ? Thanks !

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I would always choose a spacesaver over a tyre repair kit. I've had a few bad punctures over the years which no amount of the silly gunk in a tyre repair kit would have fixed!

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Spacesaver adds extra weight which will lower mpg, but it is guaranteed to work, whereas the tyre repair kit will only help in a very narrow set of circumstances.

I generally find tyre sealant repair kits bordering on useless as any puncture small enough for it to repair, you can usually over-inflate the tyre and get to a tyre repair shop before it deflates to get it repaired, and it can't help with sidewall damage or punctures in the shoulder/corner/edge of the tyre.

Even the tyre strings catlover favours are better than the tyre repair kit, as they can permanently repair the puncture if used properly, whereas the tyre repair kit will maybe get you to a tyre shop, and require a new tyre as almost no tyre shop will touch the tyre sealant goop.

 

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5 minutes ago, yossarian247 said:

I would always choose a spacesaver over a tyre repair kit. I've had a few bad punctures over the years which no amount of the silly gunk in a tyre repair kit would have fixed!

I agree. There are times when gunk won't do.

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Weight factor aside, what is the difference in price between a full size steel wheel slare and a space saver?

Factor in the cost that space saver will do perhaps 50 miles and limited speed in its life whereas a full size spare tyre can be rotated with the 4 primary tyres. 

I am pretty sure the tyre bay in the Corolla will accommodate a full size wheel (where else do you put a punctured wheel?) 

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15 minutes ago, Roy124 said:

I am pretty sure the tyre bay in the Corolla will accommodate a full size wheel (where else do you put a punctured wheel?) 

Is that the hatchback, TS or both?

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You'd have to check how deep it is; I'm skeptical a full-width spare would fit in my Mk4!!

As for cost, it depends. Brand new, full-sized alloys are more expensive than Spacesavers, which are more expensive than Steel rims.

Second hand, it's closer although alloys still tend to be more. The difference between space-savers and steel-rims are a lot closer, but the quality tends to be much worse than 2nd hand alloys (nasty and rusty!). It's up to luck depending on where you get them from.

The other thing to think about is steel-rims and alloys often use different types of wheel nut; Space-savers are usually designed to use the same kind of nut the normal wheels on the car uses. If you have alloys but get a full-sized steel spare, you may need to keep a separate set of nuts for it.

 

 

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A space saver / Noddy spare wheel is the perfect emergency get you home / to a garage option for most people.

Hopefully it will never require to be used so a full sized steel or alloy wheel is just a waste of money. 

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Space saver spare wheel and raised  floor are very good addition to 1.8 hatchback as these will make almost flat seats when folded down. Puncture repair kit and 12v compressor are also essential. I had another repair on my gf car with those stripes and all is perfect. 👍

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1 hour ago, Roy124 said:

 

Factor in the cost that space saver will do perhaps 50 miles and limited speed in its life whereas a full size spare tyre can be rotated with the 4 primary tyres. 

 

That is true if the primary tyres are not directional. I tend to fit all season tyres though which are often directional, so it's not really practical to rotate the spare in with them. Obviously you don't want to end up with a directional tyre as the spare as it would only work properly on one side of the car. 

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21 minutes ago, yossarian247 said:

Obviously you don't want to end up with a directional tyre as the spare as it would only work properly on one side of the car. 

It depends on how you view a spare tyre. I consider a get me home or to the nearest garage item. I've used them a few times in the past, and until now I alway had full size spares; I don't have a spare now. (Yes, I am hoping I don't regret the decision, but it's a payable extra these days).

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Stopeter44, I view a full size spare as a complete my journey, there and back if required, at normal speeds. 

Yossarian, take your point about directional tyres. 

Tony, mine is a 1.8 Corolla with a high floor but I value the flat load bay more than the lost capacity.  We have a dog carry box.  Fits fore and aft with seat folded. 

Cyker, I had additional nuts with the Merc

Forking, an unused space saver is a bigger waste of money as you cannot use that tyre. 

 

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16 minutes ago, Roy124 said:

Stopeter44, I view a full size spare as a complete my journey, there and back if required, at normal speeds. 

Yossarian, take your point about directional tyres. 

Tony, mine is a 1.8 Corolla with a high floor but I value the flat load bay more than the lost capacity.  We have a dog carry box.  Fits fore and aft with seat folded. 

Cyker, I had additional nuts with the Merc

Forking, an unused space saver is a bigger waste of money as you cannot use that tyre. 

 

That’s what I meant too, flat bed over capacity for me too. 👌

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As stopeater says, it's down to how you view the spare; I treat the spare the same as stopeater44 - I'd be on it as little as possible, just to get me to a tyre place (Assuming I even needed it; Almost every time I've had a puncture so far I've been able to inflate the tyre to 60PSI and drive it to the nearest tyre place to have the tyre repaired or replaced rather than having to resort to the spare!)

Even if I had a full-sized spare, I wouldn't cycle it in and out regularly with the rest of the tyres - I don't see how I'd be able to do that without ending up with tyres with all different tread depths! Having the lighter spacesaver makes more sense for me, esp. with how sensitive cars are to weight as they get into the higher mpgs.

I do like the shrinking ones some german manufacturers use which fold in on themselves when they're deflated; They save even more space! :laugh: 

 

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7 hours ago, harry_hz said:

Hi, I am purchasing a 2022 Corolla Icon Tech (1.8 Hatchback) and it comes with a Tyre Repair Kit as standard. However, I am think about using a spacesaver spare wheel instead. May I ask which one is better? Tyre Repair Kit or a spacesaver spare wheel ? Thanks !

It rather depends on how much space you need in the boot. I prefer the peace of mind of a space saver than the TRK, but the reduction in boot space by raising the boot floor made it impractical. I now have a TS with a space saver so win win!

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If you decide to get a spacesaver then check eBay as Toyota sell parts direct on there and often have discount codes.

I’ve just bought a spacesaver for mine along with jack, handle and wrench. With a 10% off code it all came to about £95 delivered and I can transfer to my new car when it arrives. Hopefully it’ll never get used and when I move on from Corollas then will be able to sell it and get some money back. 

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10 hours ago, Cyker said:

Even if I had a full-sized spare, I wouldn't cycle it in and out regularly with the rest of the tyres - I don't see how I'd be able to do that without ending up with tyres with all different tread depths! Having the lighter spacesaver makes more sense for me, esp. with how sensitive cars are to weight as they get into the higher mpgs.

Yes, and if you never rotate the tyres, then it's very difficult getting the rim off the hub. I had the problem of a flat tyre, a while back. I had to call roadside assistance. I couldn't budge the rim off the hub. So, even though I had a full size spare, It was of little use to me. Of course once it was on the car I could drive around it until suitable new tyres were sourced.

I'm wondering if I should be using that anecdote as a warning to myself (belt & braces, etc.) ?

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1 hour ago, Roy124 said:

Rotation with the spare indeed will have uneven treads. But when you lose a running tyre do you always buy two new ones? 

That’s a good question 👌 I personally may even buy all 4 new tyres if I loose a running one and have to replace it with new if current  tyres are more than a half worn out, in 2020 I hit a large pothole on the motorway and damage the rim and the tyre went, but they were relatively new so ended up replacing only one tyre, luckily I had summer tyres in storage and so just mounted one summer and drove the car for 5 days like that until my new winter arrived from Germany. Spare tyre same size and make usually suitable for rugged vehicles like 4x4’s that often get abused on dirty roads and tracks where having to change tyres is as often as we use to top up a screen wash, in all other cases in town use space saver and repair strips can do the job perfectly fine. 

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Tony, exactly. It all depends on your driving profile.  At 12,000 miles per year I would hope for less than 50% wear in year one.  In terms of driving days the majority are local running though home to tyre shop is 8 miles. 

However we do at least one journey per month of more than 150 miles in a day.  Frequently we may travel on a weekend or the evening. I would rather a full size spare over a space saver. 

That said, for the last 7 years I have had a space saver and last used it on a Sunday to get the nearest KwikFit that had my tyre spec in stock.  It was 25 miles away (in the wrong direction) and we lost a whole day.  I did replace two tyres. 

That prompts another question, at what point do you opt for a new tyre over a repair?  Personally I think about 4mm wear. 

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