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Aygo rust and MOT failure


cowboyjoe
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My 57 plate Aygo failed its MOT a month back and the most serious problems were rust near the suspension components (both offside rear and nearside rear at exactly the same spots - offside rear slightly worse than nearside). The Garage said that the welding alone would cost a minimum of £500. And that would be best case scenario assuming that that it wasn't worse as they strip the rust away (see pictures - indicated yellow chalk). My question is, do you think its worth salvaging or shall I cut my losses and scrap it? I've even been toying with the idea of learning basic welding and fixing the rust holes myself but don't think I have the confidence. I've only every done things like basic servicing (oil, air filter changes). Looking at where the rust holes are it looks very awkward to fix?  Today when I rested the axle stand on the offside rear jacking point it crumbled due to rust so there are problems in this area as well.

nearside rear 9.jpeg

nearside rear1.jpeg

nearside rear2.jpeg

nearside rear3.jpeg

offside rear 2.jpeg

offside rear 3.jpeg

offside rear 4.jpeg

offside rear 5.jpeg

offside rear 6.jpeg

offside rear 7.jpeg

offside rear 8.jpeg

offside rear 9.jpeg

offside rear 10.jpeg

offside rear 11.jpeg

offside rear 14.jpeg

offside rear seal 2.jpeg

offside rear seal 8.jpeg

offside rear seal 12.jpeg

offside rear seal.jpeg

Offside right 1.jpeg

Edited by cowboyjoe
Missed out some information.
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Has it been in a flood or lived by the sea, only true way is to get rid of the rot is to cut it out

it's right on the rear beam mounts, getting it welded up right will cost a fortune, the rear beam will need to be dropped, you may end up replacing brake lines and bushes its a can of worms

IMHO sell it as spares or repair or scrap it for £50 - 100

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I have to agree with the others here, that looks bad and not something that is economically viable to put money into. You'll be in the same position or worse in another 12 months. I think that is past the point of no return in all fairness.

 

 

 

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My brother's Mk1 Yaris was in a similar state :sad: 

It might not be worth repairing - Have a look round the rest of the car; His one had a lot of structural rust on rear trailing arms and subframe, and while we were able to source a replacement rear beam to repair it, there was enough rust on the front that they'd need doing soon too so he bit the bullet and scrapped it rather than be resigned to basically rebuilding the car bit by bit.

 

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Best to scrap it as everyone says. It’s not only that rust that is seen but more will pop up once you stray cleaning it for repair, no point. Scrap cars are well paid now . 

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Shocking amount of rust for the age of the car!

My 1989 Volvo 240 had far less, but needed nearside outrigger welded twice. Cost me £150 in 2015. A few years later welding again as rusted along the welds! Not happy as expected it to last.  A few years later sold the car. Still solid.

My 1996 Volvo 940 hasn't been welded yet, but does now have an advisory for corrosion to nearside jacking point. Going to need cutting out and welding in small 3 inch by 1 inch patch plus Battery tray at some point, before the next MOT in November. I will get it done.

If my Volvo had as much rot as your car, I do agree it's reached the end of the road. Not viable.

With my 240 I found once the tinworm gets hold your only option is to cut it all out, but that is very expensive compared to a plate over/bodge. My outrigger was cut out, but still rotted along weld join!

Depending on your funds, your current car may enable you to use a manufacturers scrappage scheme on a brand new car. 

James👍

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Just curious : how many miles did this car serve it's owners in total ? Just to know what it gave you back ... That idea could sweeten the decision perhaps.

Seeing your photos, I thought too : too far gone. 

Don't start this as a first time welding project imho.

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does look a bit extensive , unless they go crazy and cut all the rust away then there will still be areas festering away

£20 worth of cavity wax applied years ago would have saved this

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That is bad, too far gone, shame cos these cars usually good for keeping rot away. Hopefully you not emotionally attached to it, my sister was to her original Mini, spent cost of the car and some welding that, we told her to let it go, but no. As said, if that's is what you can see, it is what you can't see that could be worse.

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Were there any "advisories" on the previous MOT Nick?  It's hard to believe that IF there were no advisories on the previous MOT  - how that level of corrosion could have deteriorated to that extent within 12 months !

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Last car I see that was that rotten was a flood car (salt water) cars that should have been crushed, that got put back on the road

If you look at the rot on the floor pan/sill,  it is right along the sill looks like it has rotted from the inside out

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I used to be an MOT tester and motor fitter years ago. At this level of rot it will turn out to far worse than it looks. 
I agree with a previous statement, what's the mileage, what's the body work and interior like.
If it was my vehicle I would scrap it, there could be more rot hidden elsewhere and the results of an accident could be catastrophic. 

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59 minutes ago, KevinStone said:

I used to be an MOT tester and motor fitter years ago. At this level of rot it will turn out to far worse than it looks. 
I agree with a previous statement, what's the mileage, what's the body work and interior like.
If it was my vehicle I would scrap it, there could be more rot hidden elsewhere and the results of an accident could be catastrophic. 

Kevin, in your professional opinion, do you think that level of rot is caused by a salty environment?

I do hose down the underside of mine every now and again in winter (maybe not as often as I should 😬). What frequency of underside hose downs would you recommend when the gritters are about?

I do ACF50 all the exposed brake union joints and any reachable metal parts too (twice a year). Obviously avoiding brake discs etc.

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23 hours ago, flash22 said:

Has it been in a flood or lived by the sea, only true way is to get rid of the rot is to cut it out

it's right on the rear beam mounts, getting it welded up right will cost a fortune, the rear beam will need to be dropped, you may end up replacing brake lines and bushes its a can of worms

IMHO sell it as spares or repair or scrap it for £50 - 100

Not sure as I bought it for the Mrs about 4 years ago. At the time it had a good length MOT and didn't have any advisories for rust. The Garage bloke said that after 10 years Aygo's seem to fall off the edge of a cliff rust wise, there nice little runners though. There is a metal scrap merchants which will give me £150 for it so I might do that. Really appreciate your comments. I thought there might be a lot of work involved.

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23 hours ago, Dave the aygo said:

Looks quite bad I'd put the money towards another car 

Yep, I thank you're right. Thanks for replying. 

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22 hours ago, Mooly said:

I have to agree with the others here, that looks bad and not something that is economically viable to put money into. You'll be in the same position or worse in another 12 months. I think that is past the point of no return in all fairness.

 

 

 

Cheers. Yeah, I think its time to scrap it. I've bought the Mrs a Pug107 so I might swap some stuff around before I do. 

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22 hours ago, Cyker said:

My brother's Mk1 Yaris was in a similar state :sad: 

It might not be worth repairing - Have a look round the rest of the car; His one had a lot of structural rust on rear trailing arms and subframe, and while we were able to source a replacement rear beam to repair it, there was enough rust on the front that they'd need doing soon too so he bit the bullet and scrapped it rather than be resigned to basically rebuilding the car bit by bit.

 

True, I don't think its worth the effort. Cheers. 

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22 hours ago, TonyHSD said:

Best to scrap it as everyone says. It’s not only that rust that is seen but more will pop up once you stray cleaning it for repair, no point. Scrap cars are well paid now . 

A scrap metal merchants nearby said they would give me £150 for it so I might just do that. Thanks for replying. 

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22 hours ago, Auris James said:

Shocking amount of rust for the age of the car!

My 1989 Volvo 240 had far less, but needed nearside outrigger welded twice. Cost me £150 in 2015. A few years later welding again as rusted along the welds! Not happy as expected it to last.  A few years later sold the car. Still solid.

My 1996 Volvo 940 hasn't been welded yet, but does now have an advisory for corrosion to nearside jacking point. Going to need cutting out and welding in small 3 inch by 1 inch patch plus battery tray at some point, before the next MOT in November. I will get it done.

If my Volvo had as much rot as your car, I do agree it's reached the end of the road. Not viable.

With my 240 I found once the tinworm gets hold your only option is to cut it all out, but that is very expensive compared to a plate over/bodge. My outrigger was cut out, but still rotted along weld join!

Depending on your funds, your current car may enable you to use a manufacturers scrappage scheme on a brand new car. 

James👍

Cheers James. You're right, once rust takes hold its curtains.  Your Volvo 940 is doing really well considering its age eh? Good on yer for keeping it going. It sounds like its well looked after. I've already bought another little run around for the Mrs (Pug107 - 60 plate). Its in much better condition rust wise so should last a couple of years. I will most likely scrap the Aygo (scrap metal company has offered £150 for it) which I don't think is bad. 

 

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Would you consider wax treatment to keep it going longer ?
I don't know if it's still a lot of use to do it when it's 5- 10 years old ..  There's always a start of rust at that age, somewhere.

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16 hours ago, haelewyn said:

Just curious : how many miles did this car serve it's owners in total ? Just to know what it gave you back ... That idea could sweeten the decision perhaps.

Seeing your photos, I thought too : too far gone. 

Don't start this as a first time welding project imho.

Its up to 120K. I bought it at 110K about 3 years ago for the Mrs. In December, we bought another one (well Pug107). Its a 60 plate and has 90K on it but its in much better condition (rust wise). Should hopefully last about 3 years(fingerscrossed). Yeah, you're right, I don't think it would be wise to tackle it, especially as a first time welding project. I was thinking I might practice on it before I do anything with Pug107. Thanks for your reply! 

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10 hours ago, steveo3002 said:

does look a bit extensive , unless they go crazy and cut all the rust away then there will still be areas festering away

£20 worth of cavity wax applied years ago would have saved this

Thanks Steve. I bought a Pug107 (60plate) for the Mrs in December. I've had a look underneath and whilst there is some rust its nowhere as bad as the Aygo. I was looking at a product called Lanoguard (about £80). I was thinking I might get it to put on the Pug107 to protect it. 

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9 hours ago, Puglet said:

That is bad, too far gone, shame cos these cars usually good for keeping rot away. Hopefully you not emotionally attached to it, my sister was to her original Mini, spent cost of the car and some welding that, we told her to let it go, but no. As said, if that's is what you can see, it is what you can't see that could be worse.

True. I think its seen its best days. I bought it for the Mrs 3 years ago. In hindisight, it was a bad buy but nevermind. You win some, you lose some. Cheers for your reply.

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