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Spare wheel section in Toyota Corolla


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Hi - Collected my Corolla hybrid Icon tech the other day and noticed the boot space of the car was smaller than I had ordered due to the spare wheel coming with the car. The centre seem to have messed up my order but upon querying with them they said the issue was solvable - does anyone know how they would remove the spare wheel space and convert that into a larger boot space? Is that doable to the extent it would be the same as if the car had been ordered correctly (with the larger boot space) I’m going there next week to see what they can do but if anyone knows about this issue, I’d be keen to hear from them… 

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If the car is NOT what you ordered, and I presume you signed some documentation, reject it. That means you would have to stop driving it and hand it back.

FB’s comment is very relevant.  The boot area in a 2.0 could be different to the 1.8. Particularly the position of the 12v Battery could make a difference, it could be in the boot of one mobile and under the bonnet in the other model.

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Sid, I got a 1. 8 and the spare wheel.  I have no recollection of ordering in but might have talked about the relative merits of spare wheel and repair kit.  As it happens I was very pleased. 

The boot floor is higher which gives a flat load area when the seats are folded, again perfect for our dog carrier. There is still plenty of space for odds and ends on the spare wheel. 

The boot floor rests on large formed polystyrene sections that house the tools. They would be easy enough to remove.  What I have not looked at is the potential for then refitting boot floor lower down. 

Don't reject that spare wheel too soon. 

RE-Reading your post, get them to lower the floor for you but keep the spare wheel and kit.  You can refit at a later date. buy a repair kit if you want.  At least two of my punctures have occurred at  home so I still used me space saver. 

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Just checked my boot.  If I remove the polystyrene formers I could lower the boot floor by a few inches and it would rest on the space saver wheel. 

If I removed the wheel as well the floor would now engage with identical mouldings at the lower level. 

If you genuinely need a deeper boot and have somewhere to store the Space Saver kit I suggest you do that and buy an inflation kit*.  Before making up your mind I suggest you discuss the options with your dealer. 

*despite having a space saver I also have an inflator.  Useful as a routine and possibly able to top up if I have a slow puncture rather than a wheel change. 

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I think the spare wheel set and raised floor in Corolla hatchback is the most useful extra that can be added just because that level floor when seats are folded down, you can literally make a bedroom, or small van for transport of large items. 👍

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War Story. 

Catching the ferry from Portsmouth to Cherburg.  I topped in with fuel at the service area on on the M3.  Somewhere I picked up a piece of metal the size of an arrow head. 

By the time we reached the ferry terminal the tyre was flat.  I git through the check-in and did a rapid unload of the boot and a wheel change.  With an inflation kit we would have missed the ferry. With roadside rescue we would have missed the ferry. 

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Most people would prefer a new car with a spare wheel these days. The inflation kit normally supplied is rubbish. Keep the spare wheel for piece of mind if nothing else.

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Can’t remember last time I changed a wheel at home never mind out on the road. And if you got a spare wheel what’s the point of storing it in your garage/shed?       
Last picture I had was about 8 years ago, it was a slow puncture noticed whilst I was out and about, managed to get to my local garage.          
In reality, I don’t think I would be too bothered not having a spare in the boot.

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The last puncture I had was caused by a severe pothole strike which tore the sidewall. Fortunately I had the foresight to buy a spare wheel, jack etc and keep them under the floor. I was on the move again in less than 15 minutes. The TRK is only good for simple punctures - and a total waste of time if you need to get somewhere on a deadline (which I often do). A spare wheel is the solution for me any day of the week. But as always, it’s horses for courses. 

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2 hours ago, Catlover said:

Can’t remember last time I changed a wheel at home never mind out on the road. And if you got a spare wheel what’s the point of storing it in your garage/shed?       
Last picture I had was about 8 years ago, it was a slow puncture noticed whilst I was out and about, managed to get to my local garage.          
In reality, I don’t think I would be too bothered not having a spare in the boot.

I was thinking the same previously but the roads in uk currently are in they poorest condition ever and no wonder with that unnecessarily huge amount of salt and grit everyday in winter and millions of vehicles., having a spare tyre can be a life saver. I have in my boot spare tyre space saver, compressor, a can of sealant, and the magical puncture repair strips that many doesn’t like but I am confident I can complete my journey without need of any help in case of puncture issues. 

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The thing about a spare is it's like a backup with computers - It's an extra cost, and all being good you should never have to use it, so it seems like a waste of money, but on that one-in-a-million occurrence where you do need it it's invaluable.

There are so many stories in industry where a new bean counter comes in and cuts out the backup system to save costs, patting themselves on the back for an easy saving they can boast to their boss about, and then later on have a system failure which costs them far more than not having the backup saved them.

With the spare it's not so critical if e.g. you are not under any time pressure and have breakdown recovery, as you can just get towed, but in cases where having to wait potentially over an hour to be recovered is going to affect your livelihood, the spare is just that extra reassurance!

Although you also need to know *how* to change the tyre for it to be useful! :laugh: 

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1 minute ago, Cyker said:

With the spare it's not so critical if e.g. you are not under any time pressure and have breakdown recovery, as you can just get towed, but in cases where having to wait potentially over an hour to be recovered is going to affect your livelihood, the spare is just that extra reassurance!

Although you also need to know *how* to change the tyre for it to be useful! :laugh: 

The only time I went to use the spare on the 208, my Yaris doesn't have a spare, I couldn't get the rim of the hub! So had to call the breakdown service. OTOH, it did mean I could drive the car comfortably for a few days whilst new tyres arrived.

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  • 3 months later...
On 1/29/2022 at 12:51 PM, Roy124 said:

Just checked my boot.  If I remove the polystyrene formers I could lower the boot floor by a few inches and it would rest on the space saver wheel. 

If I removed the wheel as well the floor would now engage with identical mouldings at the lower level. 

 

When the boot floor is resting on top of the space saver, is it level?

Mine is engaged at the moulding behind the rear seats but raised at the boot opening. This could be because I am using a space saver from an Auris, hence my question in a previous post, is the Auris space saver higher, when laying on the ground, than the Corolla item?

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In my opinion it was always a bad call for manufacturers to get rid of spares in favor of the puncture repair kit.  It is all about space and saving money.  But that said mine is a works car - so if a puncture I just call the lease company and they send someone to come out.

Having said that it is peace-of-mind to have a spare.  But down-side is you lose boot space to accommodate (well that is what the information stated before I selected the Corolla).

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