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Proud New Owner - 2005 RAV4


C3PO
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Hi,

bought this 2005 Rav4 this week and love it! Great for access to fields etc…99,000 miles on the clock, brakes all replaced with new discs, and runs very smoothly. Manual box. Is there anything I need to particularly take notice of / get sorted? The bodywork is in good condition with some minor chips/scratches. Underneath the inevitable signs of some corrosion, but not bad. One of the shocks looks like it is leaking oil, but not 100% sure. Grateful for your thoughts on keeping this going as well as can be.

7EA6A965-068A-483E-9273-B2EE3D395EA0.jpeg

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PS: checked the CD and the previous owner had left it in there, classic. So Rocking All Over the World, or rather Berkshire, has been blaring out.

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So, you have a late 3dr 4.2 - I've never had one from that generation but by repute the 2.0 VVTi engine is regarded as pretty bullet proof.

From memory there may be a fifth gear issue to lookout for and I suspect that you may want to watch out for corrosion of the filler pipe. I'm not sure that either problem really affects your model - others will know for sure and they are something to look for - but both are relatively straightforward fixes if they do ...

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Thank you. I do have an issue with a yellow engine light coming on. Garage looked at it and it seemed to be something to do with the fuel? They reset it and I filled it up with BP Premium fuel, and no more issues for about 50 miles. Then it came back on again this morning. Weird and not sure what to do really. Car runs v well. Edit: sensor is new so unlikely to be that?

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Plug a code reader in and see, my guess O2 sensor as only thing which tend to fail, they have four on them around £80 for a denso one straight swap just unscrew and plug in .

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Sometimes, all you need is an Italian tune-up.  Drive 3 or 4 miles in low gear, so keeping the rpm between say 3500 and 4500.  Blows out the cobwebs.  Costs very little, and nothing to lose.

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9 hours ago, IanML said:

Sometimes, all you need is an Italian tune-up.  Drive 3 or 4 miles in low gear, so keeping the rpm between say 3500 and 4500.  Blows out the cobwebs.  Costs very little, and nothing to lose.

It’s tempting! Don’t want to blow the engine though!!!

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Just double checked model number on passenger door and it says:

ACA20R-AZMNKW

Am I right in thinking this is indeed AWD?

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1 hour ago, C3PO said:

It’s tempting! Don’t want to blow the engine though!!!

Blow the engine at 4000 rpm!  What does it red line at?

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Just now, Catlover said:

Blow the engine at 4000 rpm!  What does it red line at?

6,000 or so, but hey she’s old!

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18 minutes ago, C3PO said:

6,000 or so, but hey she’s old!

Has the car been serviced as Toyota requirements with good engine oil?      
You could have a younger car, less miles, but poorly maintained. 

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36 minutes ago, C3PO said:

Just double checked model number on passenger door and it says:

ACA20R-AZMNKW

Am I right in thinking this is indeed AWD?

The EPC shows transfer case, prop shaft and rear diff, so yes.  You could always look beneath the car.  Absence of prop shaft = front wheel drive.  I'm not sure, but the EPC seems to suggest that all the cars for Europe were 4WD.  I think AWD only came on later models - In yours and mine, the rear is only driven if the unit in the transfer case detects that the front wheels are turning faster than the rear (i.e. they are losing grip).  It works too - you can tell if you drive in loose sand.

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Had a quick look underneath and yes, there is a propshaft and rear diff in there. So what is the difference between AWD and 4x4 drive? 

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5 hours ago, Catlover said:

Has the car been serviced as Toyota requirements with good engine oil?      
You could have a younger car, less miles, but poorly maintained. 

No - service history not available for this car … picked it up fully serviced though. But will take it easy with her.

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8 hours ago, IanML said:

The EPC shows transfer case, prop shaft and rear diff, so yes.  You could always look beneath the car.  Absence of prop shaft = front wheel drive.  I'm not sure, but the EPC seems to suggest that all the cars for Europe were 4WD.  I think AWD only came on later models - In yours and mine, the rear is only driven if the unit in the transfer case detects that the front wheels are turning faster than the rear (i.e. they are losing grip).  It works too - you can tell if you drive in loose sand.

4 hours ago, C3PO said:

Had a quick look underneath and yes, there is a propshaft and rear diff in there. So what is the difference between AWD and 4x4 drive? 

There is no real difference between 4x4, 4WD and AWD - I suspect that Ian mistyped and meant to say FWD ... 

Early RAVs were permanent 4 wheel drive - as in Recreational Activity Vehicle with 4 wheel drive - hence Rav4. Over the years they became more sophisticated as Ian describes - first with a mechanical system and later with an electromechanical system to enable the car to pull away from rest in AWD mode and for the drive to the rear wheels to be withdrawn as the car picked-up speed when traction was good.

IIRC all 4.1, 4.2 and 4.3 models were AWD. From the 4.4 onwards, simpler FWD cars were introduced initially for the company car market ...

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Well, I thought 4x4 means both axles driven by any means at all, so the generic term.  4WD means one axle is always driven, and the other only when manually or automatically engaged.  AWD means both axles all the time. Ymmv.

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10 hours ago, IanML said:

Well, I thought 4x4 means both axles driven by any means at all, so the generic term.  4WD means one axle is always driven, and the other only when manually or automatically engaged.  AWD means both axles all the time. Ymmv.

Well, yes, that or something very like it. Parkers distinguish between permanent 4WD which is self-explanatory, part-time 4WD where the driver can choose between 4WD and 2WD, and AWD where the car decides which of the wheels to drive.

The later RAV4s are described by Toyota as AWD (or FWD) - which fits with the Parkers definition and is consistent with what you said in the first place! 🙂

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Yes, I think the principal distinction is that, with AWD, the software is able to drive, or not drive, particular wheels, depending on whether they have grip.  Thus, a slipping front wheel can be automatically braked to allow the other front wheel to receive drive, and if both front wheels are slipping, no torque will be applied to them.  The more primitive arrangement in the Rav4.2 will apply drive to the rear if the front slips, but there is no application of individual wheel control, and I am not sure whether it can reduce drive to the front in some fashion.

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Well, I have looked at the MOT history and am a bit worried with previous rust problems. My fear is I have bought a bucket. Going into a body shop garage next week for check. What are your thoughts on a car this age? What are the likely repair costs?

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15 years of driving on salted roads in winter - not untypical. Good idea taking it to the body shop for a good inspection.

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Dropped the car off at the garage yesterday - should know by midday what needs doing 😐

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The RAC-approved garage gave it a look look over today and said no issues! The underside had been sealed and was solid - so no further corrosion there. Pleased!

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