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Why I exchanged my Rav4 and how the Hyundai Tucson PHEV compares.


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Let me say immediately that I loved the RAV and had it been possible I would happily have bought another one, possibly the Prime. However the new car market is in a very peculiar state at the moment and I saw the chances of getting a new Rav4 within six months and at and below the 40000 tax threshold as almost nil. Looking casually at the Tucson PHEV in the Hyundai showroom in February I was surprised to be told that not only could I drive it away within a few days but I could also get a decent discount off the list price. So after a short road test, and foreseeing very high inflation in the economic pipeline, I went ahead.

Starting the comparison with the driving experience. The Hyundai is quieter under nearly all circumstances. This is not because the technology is inherently quieter but because the Tucson does not have the obsessive weight reduction philosophy which was applied to the RAV. Both the bonnet and the tailgate are much heavier to lift and the car is significantly heavier over all. The weight also gives a more planted feel to the handling and comfort. Both cars are four wheel drive but at higher speeds the Tucson is more stable if driven in a spirited way. One area where the Rav4 is unbeatable is the responsiveness to accelerator given by the transmission and control electronics. The Tucson system cannot match the RAV's instantaneous pedal response and seamless gear changing. It does not have a continuously variable system although most of the time the automatic gear changes are undetectable. On paper the Tucson is more powerful but in practice I would say they are about the same and because of the lower weight the RAV might have been a little quicker off the line.

Coming to fuel consumption this is partly a comparison between plug-in and the "ordinary" RAV hybrid. The Tucson systems is functional but less integrated than the RAV. For example it has a conventional and large 12 volt Battery bolted down in the spare wheel well which removes any possibility of carrying a spare wheel, and for some reason only the Plug-in has this arrangement whereas the Tucson Hybrid 12 volt system uses a fully integrated Lithium source. The instrumentation quotes a fairly spurious overall petrol consumption figure which ignores the use of mains electricity. In my particular circumstances the RAV returned 45 mpg overall and if I use the Tucson without extra charging it returns 40 to 45 mpg in hybrid mode. However the savings on shorter and other non-motorway trips are significant as petrol and electricity prices have risen in tandem. The driver has a decent amount of control over this thanks to various modes of operation.

Inside the car the Tucson is a little more modern with a large screen and support for Apple Carplay which gives plenty of mapping options. The built in navigation is/was not particularly good in either car. I have to say that these systems are not very important to me so I don't miss RAV's better sound system. Heated seats work better than the RAV's and they are a bit more comfortable on longer trips. The Tucson does not quite match the rear luggage space but with back seats folded it does have a flatter load area and I think rear seat legroom is a bit more generous.

In summary I have a car built in Czechoslovakia within a tighter budget. It is slightly less sophisticated than the Toyota but still a very enjoyable and practical way to travel and having moved to the plug-in option I have some control over which power source I use.

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Very interesting, I never looked at the Hyundai but did test drive a CRV which I didn't like. I felt it was noisier and not as responsive as the RAV,  I also found it uncomfortable so I chose the RAV.

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2 hours ago, Firecycle said:

Very interesting, I never looked at the Hyundai but did test drive a CRV which I didn't like. I felt it was noisier and not as responsive as the RAV,  I also found it uncomfortable so I chose the RAV.

That is interesting to see different perceptions, I found the CRV noticeably more comfortable and quieter than the Rav4 but the RAV wins hands down on CO2 which makes all the difference company car wise.

I also considered the Tucson, I adore the look of it, but as a company car driver it falls down on the RAV's Ace card, its 2.5L engine, the Tucson only has 1.6L
As I get reimbursed at HMRC AFR rates I would be losing money per mile now if I had gone for the Tucson as its gets a lower rate, with the RAV I am still making a profit per mile on the higher rate!

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I am currently evaluating between Rav4 and Kia Sportage (either facelifted model or previous one).

The pre-facelift Sportage is considerably cheaper though safety features like Adaptive Cruise Control and Auto Emergency Braking only available in GT Line S trim and that is not hybrid.

The facelift model is hybrid with all these features and price is comparable to Rav4.

In general, I find Kia/Hyundai offers nicer interior with more creature comfort. Rav4 offers lumber support in Excel and above trims only! While this is standard feature in lower trims in Kia. 

There are many other trims which are missing or only available at higher trims while in Kia comes as standard like paddle shifters.

Earlier it would have been a clear win for Kia [for me] but now with Toyota's 10-yr warranty, I might lean towards Toyota. 

Other than delay in ordering a new RAV4, I am also waiting to see if Toyota UK launches Corolla Cross soon. 
 

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My Wife and I looked at the Tucson recently, might be our imagination, but we found the front seats to be a bit narrower than the Rav4?

It has to be said that both Kia and Hyundai are killing it at the moment with their new models, indeed Kia are the top selling manufacturer for the first quarter! 

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1 hour ago, mobi said:

Other than delay in ordering a new RAV4, I am also waiting to see if Toyota UK launches Corolla Cross soon. 

Yes I also would be interested in the Corolla Cross. We will just have to wait and see what it's like in real life

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Buying new on lease pcp or any type of finance and returning the car after 3 years time I would happily buy even a Vw or bmw. Buying new or used cash or personal loan with intention to keep the car longer 5-10 years or more Toyota hybrid is most sensible choice for couple of reasons:

1. Has the best hybrid drive train ( including engine, Battery and transmission) like electric cars, almost no repairs but only a simple maintenance. 

2. One if not the most reliable cars recognised worldwide 

3. Hold their value best of all cars

4. All Toyotas drives well these days and have high safety ratings 

5. Well equipped for their price 
there are probably more reasons but that’s my few major ones. 

Kia and Hyundai indeed has stepped up their game and now you can simply place them along Toyota. Vw and all other big names. 👍

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22 hours ago, mobi said:

I am currently evaluating between RAV4 and Kia Sportage (either facelifted model or previous one).

There are many other trims which are missing or only available at higher trims while in Kia comes as standard like paddle shifters.
 

If the Kia is like the Tucson the paddle shifters are not as versatile as the Rav4. The RAV had a manual option using a separate gear shift position whereas the paddles on the Hyundai just temporarily override gear selection and usually revert to automatic quite quickly.

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Does the Tucon PHEV warm the cabin/draw the AC from Battery/EV or does it use ICE for that ?

 

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I've had my Rav nearly a year now.

What lets it down is the road noise which varies depending on road surfaces.

Coming from Landrovers and Volvos I find the amount of road noise unacceptable, and my wife agrees.

We travel up to Aberdeen on a regular basis and are in a position to compare these three vehicles over the same route.

Unfortunately this factor alone will make us look elsewhere when it comes to change, so really appreciate the comments and views re other marques 👍

Iain

 

 

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10 hours ago, roadster-rav said:

If the Kia is like the Tucson the paddle shifters are not as versatile as the RAV4. The RAV had a manual option using a separate gear shift position whereas the paddles on the Hyundai just temporarily override gear selection and usually revert to automatic quite quickly.

In Kia (and I guess in Hyundai too) if you use the paddles while shifter is in D mode, it reverts back to automatic mode after around 10 seconds. However, if you put the shifter into S mode, you can use either paddles or nudge the shifter forward/backward to up/down shift - pretty much same as in Rav4. The car will override only if you do the extreme like redlining the engine or climb steep hill in highest gear.

 

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3 hours ago, Hybrid21 said:

I've had my Rav nearly a year now.

What lets it down is the road noise which varies depending on road surfaces.

I always bought Toyota recommended tyres for my Rav4.3, Yokohama or the other one (Grabber?). Last year I decided to renew and looked through tyre reviews; decided it would either be Michelin Pilot Sports or Goodyear Assymetric.  Finally got a great price on the MPS. 

The next week on the motorway, I thought something was missing. Finally worked out it was the road noise. 
 

Consider new tyres if the rest of the car is great. 

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As Brendan says above tyres can make a massive difference.  I've often found that the tyre noise can suddenly change after a service, culprit they have played with the tyre pressures, especially if they have changed the tyres front to back. I then have to get a time of the day, usually early morning, when the temperature is stable, no sun on one side of the car and carefully reset the tyres correctly. If I can do it when the temperature is around 15/18oC then that works just fine.

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We test drove the Tucson and Santa Fe hybrid last summer and came very close to ordering the Tucson HEV. However something just held me back about it’s towing ability and pulled out of the deal. The Tucson PHEV and Santa Fe has a lower towing limit than the RAV so that was always a non starter for us. My observations were the ergonomics and features of both Hyundais are way ahead of the RAV and Hyundai/Kia infotainment system is generally regarded as one of the best from any car manufacturer. However the interior build quality is not as solid as the RAV and the hybrid system not as sophisticated by some margin. For example the hybrid Battery buffer is very small and the PHEV doesn’t run in EV mode in very cold weather whereas the RAV does. There is a Slovakian version of Top Gear type video review filmed over winter which clearly shows the limits of the Tucson versus the RAV and Peugeot 5008 PHEV. The Battery conditioner and Battery powered cabin heater are also a cost option on the Tucson/Sportage. At the end of the day you pays your money and takes your choice given which aspects appeal the most; cabin gadget count or techy  under the skin bits. I erred towards the latter and given Toyotas vast experience with hybrids, the decision was made. I also suspect at 10 years old the RAV will be a much better used buy and whilst I haven’t checked, perhaps RAV residuals are stronger? 

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1 hour ago, ernieb said:

As Brendan says above tyres can make a massive difference.  I've often found that the tyre noise can suddenly change after a service, culprit they have played with the tyre pressures, especially if they have changed the tyres front to back. I then have to get a time of the day, usually early morning, when the temperature is stable, no sun on one side of the car and carefully reset the tyres correctly. If I can do it when the temperature is around 15/18oC then that works just fine.

It's certainly not the tyre pressures Ernie, wish it was 😃

Ps the tyres are Toyo and now done about 6K miles, could be this make of tyres that are noisy.

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TBH that's what swung it for me towards Toyota.  I wanted hybrid and noone else has the length of time and development that Toyota have.

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3 hours ago, Hybrid21 said:

It's certainly not the tyre pressures Ernie, wish it was 😃

Ps the tyres are Toyo and now done about 6K miles, could be this make of tyres that are noisy.

Same here, Toyo tyres. I thought I'd get used to the road noise, but I haven't. It will put me off another Rav4. I don't do enough miles to make new tyres a viable proposition.

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On 4/18/2022 at 5:00 PM, TonyHSD said:

2. One if not the most reliable cars recognised worldwide 

Hi all.......did lots of research pre Toyota ownership days, no need really. 

I was always impressed that 80% of vehicles featured on TV travel & news programmes carried the Toyota Badge.

Mostly in parts of the world where off road capabilities & reliability are paramount.

Conclusion; 

(1) As quoted  above

(2) On site repairs & availability of spares

 (3) Good value

This was further endorsed by a family member, a civil engineer working in the middle east for most of his career. The company purchased off road vehicles several at a time. Ford, Range Rover, Nissan, etc. all featured at some point but always returned to Toyota a firm favourite on all fronts. 

Barry Wright, Lancashire. 

 

  

 

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Look what the original Top Gear did to a Toyota Pick up, everything to try to destroy it and after a new Battery it fired into life.

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5 hours ago, Yugguy1970 said:

TBH that's what swung it for me towards Toyota.  I wanted hybrid and noone else has the length of time and development that Toyota have.

Reason why I went with Toyota despite owning Kia in the past and they do hybrids as well. 

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Saw some tests/rewievs on Tucson PHEV at i-net and the Hyundai don´t have any heatpump so it has to warm the car from ICE which is a big disadvantage IMO.

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Most if not all car manufacturers are offering some sort of hybrids these days however they still have the old school technology in them that requires a regular maintenance and part replacement.
The reason why Toyota went so popular is exactly that, their hybrid technology is unique and offers a full electric car experience not only as driving similarities but with minimal maintenance required too.
Usually Toyota hybrids needs only oil and filters change at 10k miles or 12 months period along with some other items that have a long life intervals. Apart from that they are simply built to last plus they are easy to work on, in case you like to do any work by yourself.
Most other car manufacturers that offer hybrids their products has all the negatives that are inherited by the ice like timing belts, clutch, gears, torque converter, mecha tronics, direct injection etc those will need replacement at around after 100-120k miles., there is no other way around. 
The only better hybrids than Toyota are Lexus 😉👌

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27 minutes ago, HSDish said:

Saw some tests/rewievs on Tucson PHEV at i-net and the Hyundai don´t have any heatpump so it has to warm the car from ICE which is a big disadvantage IMO.

It is a cost option of over £1000. 

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Ive had a few rides - as a passenger - in Hyundai's and Kia's and find the head restraints massively uncomfortable, they just don't fit me for some reason.

Shame, as i quite like the cars.

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