Jump to content
Do Not Sell My Personal Information


Corolla meets John Deere


Recommended Posts

A Corolla hits a tractor head on. The tractor seems to have driven over the bonnet and windscreen before it flips over. 

The car seems very strong and with only linited deformation. FB_IMG_1651399179090.thumb.jpg.45f9967baa76dd69078d594559f3222c.jpg

FB_IMG_1651411195876.jpg

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites


Haha, that's now two large vehicles that have tried to drive over a Toyota and lost and been flipped over :laugh: 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks like the car did its job, hope everyone is ok, let hope the insurance pays up quickly, and you can find a new car

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That’s not your car right. The tractors engine seems to be destroyed. The drivers of both vehicles will remember that case for sure and definitely not a pleasant experience for them. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

43 minutes ago, flash22 said:

Looks like the car did its job, hope everyone is ok, let hope the insurance pays up quickly, and you can find a new car

It's not my car. The Corolla driver did'nt get a scratch, but the tractor driver got a little injury

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Corolla is very well build for sure. If a car is designed only to meet crash test procedures, it could have been much more destroyed. I don't think any official test will try to break in the windscreen and roof. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Arthur Tussik can fix it in no time. In uk will be cat B only for spares or directly for recycling. 👌

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, TonyHSD said:

Arthur Tussik can fix it in no time. In uk will be cat B only for spares or directly for recycling. 👌

Or on eBay soon 😂 "repaired to professional standards"

Pleased , no-one was hurt badly though.

 

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

How on earth can you crash with another vehicle dead front on such a narrow/tiny road?!

 

It looks that there's a little bend up front, right where the second patrol car sits, but common...

 

🤐

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm amazed at the quality of the road surface. Not a pothole in sight 😀

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, Big_D said:

I'm amazed at the quality of the road surface. Not a pothole in sight 😀

 

 Are British roads really that bad?

 

I guess that so much rain is a 'blessing' in disguise... 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Gerhard_Corolla said:

 Are British roads really that bad?

 

I guess that so much rain is a 'blessing' in disguise... 

 

 

Some roads look like freshly ploughed fields with potholes that will swallow a cyclist

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Gerhard_Corolla said:

 Are British roads really that bad?

 

I guess that so much rain is a 'blessing' in disguise... 

 

 

They are, especially in the last 10 years or so. The major problem is not the rain but the unnecessary salt and grit plus too many cars for the capacity of the infrastructure, add the rain as catalysts only. The results are unbelievable,,some places are worse than developing countries. 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Also many years of spray and chip instead of planing off the wearing course, the base course, and excavating the type 1 road base and replacing.

All down to money of course.

Also most damage is caused by HGV point load damaging the sub base ,then the above courses sink and break up.

That and patch repairs, utility restatement etc not being sealed properly at the joints leading to water ingress and heave, also breaking up the top courses.

Usually scheduled repair finance is released in April,so we should be seeing major resurfacing at least ,soon.

unfortunately major delays and disruption too, but roads cannot be repaired without closing them fully or partially.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, flash22 said:

Some roads look like freshly ploughed fields with potholes that will swallow a cyclist

For sure that guarantees an entertaining drive!

7 hours ago, TonyHSD said:

They are, especially in the last 10 years or so. The major problem is not the rain but the unnecessary salt and grit plus too many cars for the capacity of the infrastructure, add the rain as catalysts only. The results are unbelievable,,some places are worse than developing countries. 

Indeed... I cannot portray the UK as a country where salt and grit are essential to maintain the roads open in winter, maybe in Scotland, but I completely ignore if there's a lot of high ground elsewhere. For the random yearly week that is necessary, they're penalizing infrastructure and people's vehicles.

5 hours ago, Rhymes with Paris said:

Also many years of spray and chip instead of planing off the wearing course, the base course, and excavating the type 1 road base and replacing.

All down to money of course.

Also most damage is caused by HGV point load damaging the sub base ,then the above courses sink and break up.

That and patch repairs, utility restatement etc not being sealed properly at the joints leading to water ingress and heave, also breaking up the top courses.

Usually scheduled repair finance is released in April,so we should be seeing major resurfacing at least ,soon.

unfortunately major delays and disruption too, but roads cannot be repaired without closing them fully or partially.

A logistic and financial nightmare in all the areas...

It's almost impossible to properly maintain that infrastructure, unfortunately petty maintenance is the 'only' solution for such a diverse range of users. Specially if the next election is far, far away!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

They can't really win with the gritting - One year they ran out of salt because we hadn't had any snow for ages and it was an easy thing to cut down on with all the budget cuts, but as murphy's law predicts we had a cold snap and they ran out of salt and everyone started panicking and getting hysterical because they couldn't grit the roads for the few days of snow we had which was cleared by cars anyway.

Now if there's a single flake predicted they go mad gritting the roads like the possessed the night before

 

The roads here are generally not too bad, but you just get areas which inexplicably form really nasty pot holes, even after they've had a proper resurfacing they come back after a year or two.

Getting them filled in is a bit hit and miss - I suspect the vast majority of the population don't know you can report potholes, or just don't bother, so some hang around for ages.

The other one is ruts that get formed on routes travelled heavily by busses and HGVs - It's a shame as the lovely new type of tarmac they have trialled (So smooth! So quiet!!) is really prone to this and they have to go back to that nasty stoney stuff that has massive tyre roar, or worse concrete slabs (I hate those parts of the M25 so much, all tyre roar and buh-DUM-buh-DUM as you go over the gaps between the slabs!)

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Bernard Foy said:

There’s comedy in every tragedy. Thank goodness nobody was badly hurt 

Too true

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Cyker said:

Getting them filled in is a bit hit and miss

JCB's Potho!e Pro, although expensive to buy, cuts the costs of pothole repairs, and is being adopted by some councils :

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, Cyker said:

omg i want one

 

Yes they look like a useful machine.

From what I can see though, they take care of planing, sweeping, and cutting the edges of patch repairs only.

I don't think that there is a machine that can do all that and provide hot tarmac,drop chippings evenly and roll, and seal edges.

Even if there were it only addresses the wearing course and base course.

If the stone sub base was sunken or eroded by void fillings being washed away by water,it would require a whole show of equipment and men to fix.

Anything better than dropping cold tarmac into a hole and whacking with a shovel a couple of times though,it pulls out by the 10th car going over it.

Of course, it is a promo by JCB to flog their machines and focuses on what it can do, rather than the essential parts of the repair that it cannot.

As an aside, I wish I still had the photos to show you all of a road junction in Ely, traffic lights, very busy.

The road had sunk  badly without fracturing the flexible tarmac courses (surface) ,so emergency repairs needed.

All excavated out, still soft marshy stuff under the stone sub base, kept excavating down and down ,(cue jokes about when in a hole etc 😂)

Got to 3 metres depth, and found centuries old timber and reed road bed , interesting but a royal pita , so only option was to mass fill with concrete ,extending the rebar into the surrounding sub strata.

A floating foundation would not have worked with the location and hgv point loads at the traffic lights.

If someone travels through Ely , please tell me it has not sunk again.😀

Lucky they did not have me working out what to put under the cathedral , it's a bit marshy round those there parts.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Rhymes with Paris said:

Got to 3 metres depth, and found centuries old timber and reed road bed

I bet this one lasted longer than the modern roads of today 😁

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share




×
×
  • Create New...




Forums


News


Membership