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Saxacat
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I think what investigators are looking at is a large discrepancy in pressure, something that can cause an accident indeed. How much is that, I can’t say, if 3psi will trigger an alarm, not sure but if they measure 18psi vs 33psi as recommended then definitely the driver is in trouble. 

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I've seen mine vary by at least 5psi across a day just from temperature!

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On 5/14/2022 at 5:22 PM, Hybrid21 said:

Hi Edward, I have the same vehicle with the same tyres. 6300mls

I have been keeping mine at 34psi/245kpa as I find this gives a reasonably good ride.

My first service is booked next week, so not really sure what they'll do re rotation and tyre pressures.

My own feeling is that rotating every 3000mls is a bit overkill, and I would be happy for it to be done at each service. Did the dealer rotate yours at the service ?

Also I find the Toyo proxies incredibly noisy, to the extent that it's putting myself and my wife off the car, how do you find them ?

I don't think it's the tyres that are especially noisy, it's more the car that's the problem in my view. I agree with you that it's off putting. I don't think I'd buy another unless the sound insulation improves. I thought I'd get used to it but I haven't.😏

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1 hour ago, Cyker said:

I've seen mine vary by at least 5psi across a day just from temperature!

Any investigation won't be based purely on pressures alone however as with all evidence it can be used to strengthen or weaken a case, the latter being used by the defence under the rules of disclosure 

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Interesting what Firecycle has been saying.  I'd imagine that anything very much below the recommended setting would be a potential problem as under-inflated tyres are clearly going to affect a car's handling.  Indeed, by the time that they look like they may need a bit of air by visual inspection alone, they are likely to be getting down towards just 10-15psi.  Going a bit above would seem to be less of an issue, as the handbook usually specifies a higher pressure for carrying heavy loads or for travelling at sustained high speeds.  I used to tow heavy loads, so I generally used to keep my pressures on the upper setting, even when not towing.  As long as the pressures aren't materially above the upper pressure recommendation, can this really be seen to be an issue?  If it can, please let us know!!!

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15 hours ago, Sealiedog said:

I don't think it's the tyres that are especially noisy, it's more the car that's the problem in my view. I agree with you that it's off putting. I don't think I'd buy another unless the sound insulation improves. I thought I'd get used to it but I haven't.😏

when I test drive the HEV i thought it very noisy and noted the lack of sound absorbing material in the boot. I also think the hard plastic side panels do not help either - most cars in this class are comprehensively carpeted which will reduce sound reverberation. The PHEV is acceptable, not as good as some and no where near as quiet as my previous Volvo which had almost 1” thick carpet/soundproofing. 

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1 hour ago, Flatcoat said:

when I test drive the HEV i thought it very noisy and noted the lack of sound absorbing material in the boot. I also think the hard plastic side panels do not help either - most cars in this class are comprehensively carpeted which will reduce sound reverberation. The PHEV is acceptable, not as good as some and no where near as quiet as my previous Volvo which had almost 1” thick carpet/soundproofing. 

Our last car was a Volvo XC60, I think that's why I find the Rav4 so noisy. We didn't notice it on the test drive, it's only when you're sitting in it for 200mls that it drives you nuts 😟

Ps I wonder if the Lexus is any better ?

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Had the first service done today 6400mls and one year old.

All tyres shown as 7mm on service checksheet. They have been rotated but not sure which way.

I've checked the pressures and all set at 35psi. I dropped them back to 34psi for the moment.

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Lexus definitely are better sound proof and this is imo the reason why Toyota aren’t, if they are at the same level who would like to pay more for a Lexus?! 😉👌

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13 hours ago, TonyHSD said:


Lexus definitely are better sound proof and this is imo the reason why Toyota aren’t, if they are at the same level who would like to pay more for a Lexus?! 😉👌

I would imagine that the Lexus would be better build quality all round ? Never been in one, but certainly interested in the comparison with Toyota.

Also I assume the Lexus dealerships would be on a different level to Toyota ?

 

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19 hours ago, Hybrid21 said:

Had the first service done today 6400mls and one year old.

All tyres shown as 7mm on service checksheet. They have been rotated but not sure which way.

I've checked the pressures and all set at 35psi. I dropped them back to 34psi for the moment.

I have been thinking about the tyre wear after the first year.

If all my tyres are 7mm, what is the point of rotating the wheels then ?

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20 minutes ago, Hybrid21 said:

I have been thinking about the tyre wear after the first year.

If all my tyres are 7mm, what is the point of rotating the wheels then ?

The measurement at a service is accurate only to the nearest 0.5 mm at best. So it would be reasonable for the fronts to have been at 6.8 mm and the rears at 7.2 mm before they were 'rotated'. You'd have to go a measure them as accurately as you can to know any better.

You have used, nominally, 1 mm of tread in 6k miles. There are 6 mm of usable tread on the average tyre (i.e. the tread from 8 mm new to 2 mm worn). On that basis your tyres should last around 36k miles. (I've had 40k - 50k out of a set of tyres on previous RAVs.)

But the point in rotation remains an attempt to even out wear across the set. Rotation makes sense if you have a full sized spare; swapping front to rear makes more sense if you have a skinny spare or gunk ...

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On 5/17/2022 at 12:42 PM, Hybrid21 said:

Our last car was a Volvo XC60, I think that's why I find the RAV4 so noisy. We didn't notice it on the test drive, it's only when you're sitting in it for 200mls that it drives you nuts 😟

Ps I wonder if the Lexus is any better ?

Same here, my last car was a Ford Edge, very quiet with Ford's noise cancelling technology which is very effective. The Rav4 is not terrible, but I'm aware of it all the time.

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Posted in another thread. With my 2008 DCAT I always bought recommended tyres from Toyota. A year ago, after tyre research for my Porsche, I read various reviews, got some quotes and went for Michelin Pilot Sports. The next week on the motorway I felt something was missing. Eventually it occurred to me; noise. I can now talk normally in the car at 75mph, not with raised voice. The last trip across Spain to Andorra was a pleasure. Don’t underestimate the annoyance, and fatigue, from road noise. NB the car never sees off-road. 

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