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Real life MPG and opinions on a 2014/15/16 Auris Diesel


DAF XF
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Hi as an ex diesel Auris owner (a 2008 2 litre), I have always had a soft spot for Toyota - when I finally parted with mine after many years of motoring I changed brand to a C'eed 1.6 crdi.  Whilst it has been relatively faultless I've had a few niggles that are always under warranty...until you try to get them.  Anyway I won't get into all that but I'm a relatively high mileage user (20,000 to 25,000 a year) and due to the niggles and ever increasing fuel prices am considering switching back to an Auris.  So just wondering what the views are on the 1.4 diesel Auris of the 2014-2016 sort of age range?

My old 2008 Auris was pre DPF so never had any issues, the C'eed does have one but never presented an issue (interesting side note - apparently Kia don't have a lot of DPF issues and this is put down to it being so close to the engine - not sure how much truth is in that) so just wondering how big an issue it may be in the Auris - especially in a car likely to be sitting around the 70,000 mile mark.  I know so much is down to previous owner driving habits and style but curious to know.  My own driving is approx 60-75% dual carriageway or motorway so it's not 3 mile stop start trips.  I noticed something online about Auris up to and around 2013 having a few issues with DPFs?

Regarding MPG my old Auris it took a momentous effort and a lot of luck to see a tank average anything above 50mpg (measured in real terms not just off the trip computer) and overall averaged about 48mpg over my final year of ownership.  Since getting the C'eed which is almost 8 years younger I've found it disappointingly thirsty - averaging 54mpg over the last 4 years or so.  I made the mistake of thinking a more modern, smaller engine would be sitting at or around 60mpg when driven economically.  I've on occasion managed 60 or just over on a tank but again it's a big effort to do so.  

I've looked honest john real mpg and while it matches quite closely with previous cars (47.1mpg on the 2008 Auris compared to 48mpg on mine and 52.6mpg compared to 54mpg on the C'eed) the fact you can't see how many have been submitted makes it a bit uncertain.  I note it indicates a 2013-2019 Auris 1.4 d4d as 57.4mpg which seems encouraging.

I can't remember the old Auris service intervals on the 2.0 D4D but the C'eed is 20,000 miles which is handy.  I know with timing chains some think it wiser to change oil more frequently so perhaps Toyota have it right as from what I can see it would be a 10,000 mile interval.

Does anyone have any pearls of wisdom?  Anything else to share - welcoming all thoughts!

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Toyota service intervals are 12 months or 10,000 miles, whichever occurs first.

A regards the second generation Auris, diesel options were Toyota's 1.4 D4D, or additionally from 2015 a BMW 1.6D4D - essentially the BMW N47. engine.

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+1 for Toyota hybrid especially if you drive 15000 Miles + a year.
I do up to 50k a year in 2010 Auris Hybrid and average consumption in winter is around 50mpg , summer around 60mpg, easily said 55mpg average all year around. I am sensible driver but even if I am not  I still be able to get close to these numbers. Driving experience between hybrids and diesels is day and night. I will only consider a diesel powered car if it’s 2.5-3.0 cc and above size engine and 5-6 cylinder, anything less no point to be a diesel. For the dpf of the diesels , the major problem comes from the time the car been ON, not the driving style. Even you drive in town mostly if you drive a lot 30-40 or more minutes at a time the car will have time to rise exhaust temperature and burn accumulated dirt. My personal opinion is that if you are about to buy a Toyota, best Toyota is the hybrid one, better even than their Evs currently available. 👍 If you like diesels, there are better ones like Peugeot, Mercedes, vag cars. 

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I think I was spoilt with diesels - the 1ND-TV in my Mk1 Yaris and 1CD-FTV in my bro's E120 Corolla are probably the nicest diesel engines I've ever driven; High-revving and close-ratio gearboxes!

My brother bought a Hyundai i30 1.6 diesel to replace his rust-in-peace Mk1 Yaris D4D, and it's just so much worse to drive - If this is what people normally think of as a diesel no wonder so many people hate them!

The engine has a much lower rev ceiling and really really doesn't like to be revved, and the gear ratios are far too long and don't overlap enough. The car has bags of torque so still has that unrelenting pull you get from a diesel, but it's sooooo sloooowwww! It takes forever to accelerate! I've driven Transit vans with more pep!

I think he's tempted by my Mk4 as it's so much more nimble and responsive, but can't justify the cost as he doesn't drive super regularly (And when he does it's all long distance); That instant accelerator response is so addictive :naughty: :laugh: 

He also misses the 70+mpg he'd get with the Mk1 on motorway runs - The i30 doesn't even get close to that, although somewhat expected as it is a much bigger and heavier car... On a cruise it'd probably do okay as it can rev very low in top gear with just enough torque to keep it moving, but traffic jams slaughter it.

 

 

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13 hours ago, Catlover said:

Have you considered a Auris hybrid car?  No DPF is the first advantage, but lots more

 

10 hours ago, TonyHSD said:

+1 for Toyota hybrid especially if you drive 15000 Miles + a year.
I do up to 50k a year in 2010 Auris Hybrid and average consumption in winter is around 50mpg , summer around 60mpg, easily said 55mpg average all year around. I am sensible driver but even if I am not  I still be able to get close to these numbers. Driving experience between hybrids and diesels is day and night. I will only consider a diesel powered car if it’s 2.5-3.0 cc and above size engine and 5-6 cylinder, anything less no point to be a diesel. For the dpf of the diesels , the major problem comes from the time the car been ON, not the driving style. Even you drive in town mostly if you drive a lot 30-40 or more minutes at a time the car will have time to rise exhaust temperature and burn accumulated dirt. My personal opinion is that if you are about to buy a Toyota, best Toyota is the hybrid one, better even than their Evs currently available. 👍 If you like diesels, there are better ones like Peugeot, Mercedes, vag cars. 

Thanks for the replies.  I had for a while as the thought of no troublesome diesel emission systems appealed, however considering a hybrid automatically adds about £4-£6k onto the price.  A lot to make up for in fuel savings.  I also could only find equally conflicting evidence from people saying it works great fuel economy wise on motorways to others saying it works in towns and stop start traffic but becomes just a normal but heavier petrol car on a motorway.  I've only driven diesels (apart from when learning) and wouldn't personally be interested in a VAG car.  I know a lot of taxi drivers use the prius and Auris hybrid so big miles clearly aren't an issue but their driving is perhaps more town/stop start than long runs on the motorway?

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I personally find the older HSDs less pleasant to drive on the motorway as they tend to get very revvy when suddenly demanding beans at high speed, and there is a noticeable delay between the beans being demanded and being delivered, but driven sensibly you can still get good mileage as evidenced by our king of ridiculous annual mileage TonyHSD :laugh: 

The new ones have been set up so the electrics work at much higher speeds which makes it much easier to get high mpgs at motorway speeds, and also gives them a much more immediate and almost diesel-like punch, and the ICE's can switch from frugal Atkinson/Miller mode to a more powerful normal/Otto-cycle petrol engine mode (Albeit with the thirst of a normal petrol engine!), but this probably doesn't help you much as I'm guessing you don't want to be paying that sort of money...

It's tricky as you say, as the hybrids have been holding their value unbelievably well, even creeping up slightly down here due to demand caused by the ULEZ. :wallbash:

 

If you really want the 1.4D4D, it isn't too bad in the Auris - Not as nice to drive as the 2.0 as the engine doesn't have the planet-moving torque of the 2.0, so you might have to hang on to a gear a bit longer if you're in a hurry, but it's such a strong engine it's okay and is still capable of very respectable mpgs, +/-5mpg of what you currently get I reckon. I think DPF issues won't be as bad too as it has to work harder to move the Auris, so will get and stay hot faster, which is the key for DPF health and good efficiency.

In the Yaris, the 1.4 takes eons to warm up when driven gently, and if only used in short journeys the DPF never gets a chance to regenerate, but the Auris being heavier might be less prone to that, plus with you letting it stretch its legs regularly on the motorway it should be alright. I used to just hoon the nuts off mine whenever I was visiting my brother as I found that helped burn off deposits from all the city driving, maybe clear out the (also pre-DPF) exhaust. The engine always felt much looser and free-revving after one of those runs :laugh: 

Don't drive it too gently, throw some V-Power at it now and then, and make sure you do the oil changes religiously on time/distance as that is the biggest achilles heel of most Toyota engines - Good regular oil changes is what keeps them reliable and long-lived. People that skimp on them or use rubbish oil will find the engine developing problems sooner rather than later...

 

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3 hours ago, Cyker said:

I think I was spoilt with diesels - the 1ND-TV in my Mk1 Yaris and 1CD-FTV in my bro's E120 Corolla are probably the nicest diesel engines I've ever driven; High-revving and close-ratio gearboxes!

My brother bought a Hyundai i30 1.6 diesel to replace his rust-in-peace Mk1 Yaris D4D, and it's just so much worse to drive - If this is what people normally think of as a diesel no wonder so many people hate them!

The engine has a much lower rev ceiling and really really doesn't like to be revved, and the gear ratios are far too long and don't overlap enough. The car has bags of torque so still has that unrelenting pull you get from a diesel, but it's sooooo sloooowwww! It takes forever to accelerate! I've driven Transit vans with more pep!

I think he's tempted by my Mk4 as it's so much more nimble and responsive, but can't justify the cost as he doesn't drive super regularly (And when he does it's all long distance); That instant accelerator response is so addictive :naughty: :laugh: 

He also misses the 70+mpg he'd get with the Mk1 on motorway runs - The i30 doesn't even get close to that, although somewhat expected as it is a much bigger and heavier car... On a cruise it'd probably do okay as it can rev very low in top gear with just enough torque to keep it moving, but traffic jams slaughter it.

 

What year is the i30?  I remember having one for a couple of weeks when the Auris was off the road (not my fault or the cars!) and it was nice but very fresh maybe a 2016 model and know what you mean.  Yeah I can remember my first car a 1.5 diesel clio that thing would easily do 65-70mpg over the full tank - as you say there is no magic way to get a bigger, heavier car to match it unfortunately!

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26 minutes ago, Cyker said:

I personally find the older HSDs less pleasant to drive on the motorway as they tend to get very revvy when suddenly demanding beans at high speed, and there is a noticeable delay between the beans being demanded and being delivered, but driven sensibly you can still get good mileage as evidenced by our king of ridiculous annual mileage TonyHSD :laugh: 

The new ones have been set up so the electrics work at much higher speeds which makes it much easier to get high mpgs at motorway speeds, and also gives them a much more immediate and almost diesel-like punch, and the ICE's can switch from frugal Atkinson/Miller mode to a more powerful normal/Otto-cycle petrol engine mode (Albeit with the thirst of a normal petrol engine!), but this probably doesn't help you much as I'm guessing you don't want to be paying that sort of money...

It's tricky as you say, as the hybrids have been holding their value unbelievably well, even creeping up slightly down here due to demand caused by the ULEZ. :wallbash:

 

If you really want the 1.4D4D, it isn't too bad in the Auris - Not as nice to drive as the 2.0 as the engine doesn't have the planet-moving torque of the 2.0, so you might have to hang on to a gear a bit longer if you're in a hurry, but it's such a strong engine it's okay and is still capable of very respectable mpgs, +/-5mpg of what you currently get I reckon. I think DPF issues won't be as bad too as it has to work harder to move the Auris, so will get and stay hot faster, which is the key for DPF health and good efficiency.

In the Yaris, the 1.4 takes eons to warm up when driven gently, and if only used in short journeys the DPF never gets a chance to regenerate, but the Auris being heavier might be less prone to that, plus with you letting it stretch its legs regularly on the motorway it should be alright. I used to just hoon the nuts off mine whenever I was visiting my brother as I found that helped burn off deposits from all the city driving, maybe clear out the (also pre-DPF) exhaust. The engine always felt much looser and free-revving after one of those runs :laugh: 

Don't drive it too gently, throw some V-Power at it now and then, and make sure you do the oil changes religiously on time/distance as that is the biggest achilles heel of most Toyota engines - Good regular oil changes is what keeps them reliable and long-lived. People that skimp on them or use rubbish oil will find the engine developing problems sooner rather than later...

 

No unfortunately the newer hybrids are definitely out of the question - I think for my driving a plug in hybrid with a good 35-45 mile ev range would be ideal but its the £££'s that make it not 😂  Very good point about the smaller engine working harder perhaps helping the DPF hadn't really thought about that.  I know what you mean I always like to treat the cars to a few back to back tanks of ultimate and the odd dose of millers ecomax into a tank to just do what I can (whether it helps or not who knows) to just try and keep things as nice and clean and well running as they should.

Does anyone know if any of the general OBD 2 apps such as carista or torque or carscanner can show dpf soot levels etc?  I know VAG vehicles seem a lot more accessible to this stuff but finally was able to find how to do it on the Kia - would be handy on a test drive to check.

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Yes you will pay more for a Toyota Auris hybrid than a diesel Auris, but then you get more when you sell it. I found it with the pain to get the gain.

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1 hour ago, DAF XF said:

What year is the i30?  I remember having one for a couple of weeks when the Auris was off the road (not my fault or the cars!) and it was nice but very fresh maybe a 2016 model and know what you mean.  Yeah I can remember my first car a 1.5 diesel clio that thing would easily do 65-70mpg over the full tank - as you say there is no magic way to get a bigger, heavier car to match it unfortunately!

 

Not 100% sure but think it  might be 2016 and £0 tax... I will say it's really nice to sit in, much more comfortable than my Yaris! :laugh: 

And yeah, you can't beat adding lightness for performance or mpg!

 

 

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2 hours ago, DAF XF said:

 

Thanks for the replies.  I had for a while as the thought of no troublesome diesel emission systems appealed, however considering a hybrid automatically adds about £4-£6k onto the price.  A lot to make up for in fuel savings.  I also could only find equally conflicting evidence from people saying it works great fuel economy wise on motorways to others saying it works in towns and stop start traffic but becomes just a normal but heavier petrol car on a motorway.  I've only driven diesels (apart from when learning) and wouldn't personally be interested in a VAG car.  I know a lot of taxi drivers use the prius and auris hybrid so big miles clearly aren't an issue but their driving is perhaps more town/stop start than long runs on the motorway?

That’s completely wrong about Toyota hybrids, perhaps left over general opinion from uneducated auto journalists. Toyota hybrids are light weight, efficient and easy and nice to drive. They have gradually improved over the years and currently if you about to purchase a car different from full ev then there is no better choice new or used. Except obviously if you have a specific needs like ultra small petrol manual, or large pick up truck or perhaps a sport or high performance car. For commuting, business travel or for a trade like taxi, delivery, fleet Toyota hybrids are the best and here is why: 


1. Drive nice and easy 🚗

2. Minimal maintenance cost 💲 

3. Most efficient 🔋

 

 

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Been in similar situation- had non dpf VAG pd diesel, which was torquey and fun to drive. Had Ceed albeit 3 pot turbo petrol, good. Have 2 litre hybrid and it is the best current option. It would do 50 mpg easily in mixed driving conditions. It won't beat diesel on motor way ie if you do 70 mph on motorway with hybrid and diesel car, you will find diesel better to drive but hybrid will always beat diesel in urban areas, and it won't have dpf related problems.

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MWay driving is basically the same in any car, stick the right foot down and you will get less mpg.  With a Toyota hybrid there are lots of driving techniques you can choose to adopt, or not, that will increase the mpg. Most of those techniques will lower the stress level when driving on todays very busy roads.

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15 minutes ago, Catlover said:

MWay driving is basically the same in any car, stick the right foot down and you will get less mpg.  With a Toyota hybrid there are lots of driving techniques you can choose to adopt, or not, that will increase the mpg. Most of those techniques will lower the stress level when driving on todays very busy roads.

This is one of the main reasons why I bought a Hybrid.. After testing driving a Corolla with a HUD, it felt like a mini game for me and it pushed me to drive in a better a more gentle manner and it really was a pleasure to drive on busy roads, made me more patient. 

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11 minutes ago, Perry313 said:

This is one of the main reasons why I bought a Hybrid.. After testing driving a Corolla with a HUD, it felt like a mini game for me and it pushed me to drive in a better a more gentle manner and it really was a pleasure to drive on busy roads, made me more patient. 

Well, they say patience is a virtue (the Bible calls it long suffering - no mother in law jokes). It is very true. Get stuck in a jam, be it MWay, or any other road, and what can you do but to sit there and be patient. Jump up and down in your seat, but that doesn’t get you out of the jam, just nearer to a unscheduled visit to hospital with a heart attack maybe.

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Yeah, I find it weirdly pleasant how driving the car just relaxes you. I don't know if it's magnetic waves affecting my brain or something but I just feel super chilled in the car, don't feel so annoyed at the terrible driving of other people, just leave them space to get themselves in trouble without it affecting me and roll on. It's less "YOU $$*$&% *$&$£&£($ MOTHER*$&£"^" and more "*shakes head* *sigh*  Pillock."

That said I do still sometimes just plant the accelerator while laughing maniacally, e.g. when I'm first at the lights, but that's just a statistical anomaly... :whistling1:

(This thing is soooo fun to drive :laugh: )

 

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I can imagine what you mean about it being very calming.  I notice it (too a lesser extent probably) when trying to eek every bit out of each litre of diesel, happy to sit at 55 while everyone else in the right hand lanes are constantly either hard on the accelerator or hard on the brake, cruising up to junctions etc.  I'm sure if Drs examined it, it would have a great impact for anyone suffering from high blood pressure 😂

I don't get why whether or not you care about the environment - why you wouldn't try and save fuel!

I know if I could afford a hybrid I'd be in a never ending game of trying to beat my best ever mpg😂

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2 hours ago, DAF XF said:

I can imagine what you mean about it being very calming.  I notice it (too a lesser extent probably) when trying to eek every bit out of each litre of diesel, happy to sit at 55 while everyone else in the right hand lanes are constantly either hard on the accelerator or hard on the brake, cruising up to junctions etc.  I'm sure if Drs examined it, it would have a great impact for anyone suffering from high blood pressure 😂

I don't get why whether or not you care about the environment - why you wouldn't try and save fuel!

I know if I could afford a hybrid I'd be in a never ending game of trying to beat my best ever mpg😂

People are off their heads these days and this perhaps shows how unhappy they are for one reason or the other. 
Auris hybrid vs Auris diesel fuel consumption will be very similar if both cars been used same way and on longer trips let say at 60mph. The advantage of the Auris hybrid is the smoother and quieter drive plus the minimal maintenance cost plus the less mechanical issues plus less stress. These cars drives very easily and this is also a reason why they had been chosen by the trade and taxis. 

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Hi I own a Toyota Auris 2016 business edition 1.6 diesel and the car is OK but the fuel consumption is terrible.  When filled it says the range is 550 miles but that lasts like a week and I don't do anywhere near that a week.

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58 minutes ago, Rollo316 said:

Hi I own a Toyota auris 2016 business edition 1.6 diesel and the car is OK but the fuel consumption is terrible.  When filled it says the range is 550 miles but that lasts like a week and I don't do anywhere near that a week.

That's disappointing to hear I guess economy isn't the 1.6 engines strong point. Assuming we are round about the same 50-55 litre fuel tank that's poor. My 1.6 kia would show 550 but you'd theoretically maybe get 620ish. What do you reckon your mpg is? Another reason to make me seek the 1.4 although getting one after the 2015 face-lift is proving more difficult than I imagined. 

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I would say the complete opposite for the Auris, it shows 550 but theoretically your getting almost half that.  I do a 30 mile round trip, mainly motor way driving and by the end I've used almost 80 of my fuel.  The MPG says it can get to 50-55 on motorway driving but as soon as I hit city driving it drops to 42mpg at tops.  As I said my wife does same distance but more times a week and she fills her car up less than me.  Now it could be my driving but I very much doubt it, I think the 1.6 diesel is terrible for its range.  I felt my old mazda 2 was better for fuel

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51 minutes ago, Rollo316 said:

I would say the complete opposite for the auris, it shows 550 but theoretically your getting almost half that.  I do a 30 mile round trip, mainly motor way driving and by the end I've used almost 80 of my fuel.  The MPG says it can get to 50-55 on motorway driving but as soon as I hit city driving it drops to 42mpg at tops.  As I said my wife does same distance but more times a week and she fills her car up less than me.  Now it could be my driving but I very much doubt it, I think the 1.6 diesel is terrible for its range.  I felt my old mazda 2 was better for fuel

But these are not proper calculations. Your fuel tank is perhaps smaller in comparison to other cars. There is also a difference sometimes of what the car shows as estimates and what can be achieved in real world. To get these two close you need to drive a lot in various conditions every day., repeatedly.  I do exactly that and my estimates almost completely matching the real world mpg. You will need to do brim to brim first click at the same garage same pump. Only then you can have somewhat real world consumption. 👍

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