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scannerman
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Doing a oil change on my wife's 08 Yaris2, with the car jacked up on stands, running the engine to warm the oil, noticed that the front drivers wheel was rotating. Car was in neutral. I put my hand on the wheel to stop it which it did but started to rotate as soon as I let it go. Have I a problem?

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Not at all. Sleep easy at night.

Best way to warm an engine ready for oil change is to drive it. Economic way of changing engine oil is to do straight after you come in from a run, either from work or shopping etc. when engine oil is thoroughly warm and runny.

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It's perfectly normal, the input shaft is spinning with no gear selected when the engine is running, the motion is still transferred to the output shaft and diff to the wheels, with no resistance the road wheel will turn

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2 hours ago, Catlover said:

Best way to warm an engine ready for oil change is to drive it.

Back in the days of Duckhams hypergrade 15w-50 (non-synthetic) it was a necessity to warm it but with today's water thin synthetic oils is it still necessary?

 

DUCKHAMS HYPERGRADE 15W-50 SN/CF | Alexander Duckham & Co., Ltd

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6 minutes ago, Stivino said:

Yes 

Would you care to elaborate?

Back in the day 15w-50 oil was like treacle (maybe slight exaggeration) so it needed warming to help it flow out of the drain plug todays oil as i said above is like water so why do you need to warm it up?

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7 minutes ago, Stivino said:

It's not just about the fact the it flows more freely when hot.

 

I did ask you to elaborate is that the best explanation you can come up with.

I am sure many here remember the old days of thick oil which as i said did need warming,   i am sure the same people would be interested to hear other reasons why you have to warm todays extremely thin oil apart from the aforementioned reason that it makes oil it flow easier.

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Of course I can come up with a better explanation but, as I've been unwell and in my bed all day, I really can't be bothered.

Why don't you go to Google with your rotten attitude, I'm sure you'll find the information you are looking for.

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15 minutes ago, Stivino said:

Why don't you go to Google with your rotten attitude, I'm sure you'll find the information you are looking for.

WOW, you basically shot my post down in flames with no explanation then tell me i have a rotten attitude when i ask what other reasons you would need to warm modern oil, this is a friendly and helpful forum with some knowledgeable members and i dont want to make trouble but i think you need to look a little closer to home for the person with the rotten attitude.  

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Yes, it does need the oil to be warmed up, even the thinnest engine oil when cold it’s not thin enough to drain properly. Also good for transmission fluid the car to be warmed up before change. Coolant though you want it cold out 👌

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Cold oil clings to metal surfaces and adds protection, when hot it has a lower surface tension and can flow

with the advent of 0w8 lubrication is more at a molecular level

Older cars have larger tolerances, so it needs a thicker oil to take up those clearances and maintain surface tensions

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2 hours ago, Max_Headroom said:

why do you need to warm it up?

I imagine at least some of the undesirable matter will settle out as the engine cools and I'd expect it's also to do with getting as much of that as possible back into suspension, so it leaves with the old oil. 

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The other issue is that when its cold its in the sump and needs pumping up and around the engine.  It will be viscous and hence harder to circulate.

In my corrado (which is from 1994) i get the oil temp up to 80C before going over 3000rpm

 

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28 minutes ago, corradovr6 said:

The other issue is that when its cold its in the sump and needs pumping up and around the engine.  It will be viscous and hence harder to circulate.

In my corrado (which is from 1994) i get the oil temp up to 80C before going over 3000rpm

 

Ooh nice, someone down the road from me had a bright yellow VR6 Corrado. Sounded awesome :biggrin: 

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5 hours ago, Max_Headroom said:

Back in the days of Duckhams hypergrade 15w-50 (non-synthetic) it was a necessity to warm it but with today's water thin synthetic oils is it still necessary?

 

DUCKHAMS HYPERGRADE 15W-50 SN/CF | Alexander Duckham & Co., Ltd

Probably with the 08 Yaris of the original poster, yes, it would be beneficial to warm up the engine. Likewise with my current car.

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In the interests of total safety I would let the engine run on its own four wheels, rather than jacking it up, putting it on stands and then running engine. I know you have it in neutral but I would be more comfortable not running a car on axle stands. Just my humble opinion.

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14 hours ago, Bernard Foy said:

In the interests of total safety I would let the engine run on its own four wheels, rather than jacking it up, putting it on stands and then running engine. I know you have it in neutral but I would be more comfortable not running a car on axle stands. Just my humble opinion.

Safety first, or perhaps second. Early days of my car engineering work. What could possibly go wrong. 😂

Going under the car today again. Something wrong has happened last night and I need to check. 👍

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8 minutes ago, Cyker said:

I love the bricks :laugh: 

Me too 👍

Got my issue solved. The brake disc metal covers, they are old and rusty and one got hit by something and bent and was touching the disc and while turning and reverse the disc squeeze it in and broke it , a loud metal clunk , not pleasant at all, especially when you know you have 150 miles left to complete and it’s 2 a clock in the morning. Have the front brakes serviced as well, probably will do the rears tomorrow. Here some pics. 

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