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kltm
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I have just purchased a Toyota Corolla Touring Sport 2.0 VVT-I Hybrid GR 5DR CVT 21 Plate

2 Problems.

1. When I start the car I get flashing orange tyre symbol, which I guess is tyre pressure. I've gone into settings and pressed the OK button to reset i, but it stays on. What does it mean?

2. I removed a 64gB USB stick from our last car (a Volvo V60). This stick contained loads of MP3 files. The folder hierarchy was Artist/Album/Track. The Toyota wouldn't even recognise it. I reformatted the drive firstly as MS DOS FAT and then as FAT 32. Although the USB came up as EFI, it just said 'No music files found'. Ive tried with 3 different USB drives and still the same message. Anybody any ideas before i take the car back.

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29 minutes ago, kltm said:

When I start the car I get flashing orange tyre symbol, which I guess is tyre pressure. I've gone into settings and pressed the OK button to reset i, but it stays on.

What you haven't said is whether you checked the tyres pressures before resetting the TPMS.

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USB formatted in fat 32 on a PC, what format are the music files in mp3, flac, ogg or other ??

if the drive is coming up with an efi partition, it's formatted wrong

in windows right click the drive - format, select fat 32 and untick Quick format

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Hi thanks for this. It seems a lot of USB drives have an EFI Partition. It isn't as simple as just reformatting it as FAT32. To get rid of it you have to go to the windows command prompt as an administrator. You then run DISKPART followed by LIST DISK. Once done you run SEL DISK 1, in my case, to select the USB drive. Then type clean, which will erase the drive completely. Then run the command SET PARTITION PRIMARY. You can then go back into windows, remove and replace the USB drive to clear the system. Once cleared, deselect QUICK FORMAT and format it. Altogether on a 64gb drive it takes about 40 minutes.

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On 12/3/2022 at 3:58 PM, kltm said:

I have just purchased a Toyota Corolla Touring Sport 2.0 VVT-I Hybrid GR 5DR CVT 21 Plate

2 Problems.

1. When I start the car I get flashing orange tyre symbol, which I guess is tyre pressure. I've gone into settings and pressed the OK button to reset i, but it stays on. What does it mean?

*** This means your tyre pressures are out on one or more tyres.  Best check your tyre pressures to the correct pressure (or 2PSI above).

2. I removed a 64gB USB stick from our last car (a Volvo V60). This stick contained loads of MP3 files. The folder hierarchy was Artist/Album/Track. The Toyota wouldn't even recognise it. I reformatted the drive firstly as MS DOS FAT and then as FAT 32. Although the USB came up as EFI, it just said 'No music files found'. Ive tried with 3 different USB drives and still the same message. Anybody any ideas before i take the car back.

*** You say you have reformatted - that would surely wipe the files from the drive so nothing will be there now.  However if you mean you reformatted and then added the music files but still nothing it might be you need to reformat to Fat32 or if the USB stick is larger than 4GB then exFat would be better option... but it is just seem devices can't read exFat.

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23 hours ago, Sooty said:

Some systems can NOT read USB sticks that are larger than 32GB.

 

This is true.

But I am always suspicious of quotes like this as I like to ask: "why not?"  Yes I know it has always been the case, even with SD Cards too.

Yes I know all about the software, firmware and formatting etc. but surely in this day and age any size drive should be easily read by the unit?  And I also know that USB1 is different to USB2 and USB3, etc.  But I have had external drives of 1TB+ plugged into PC/Laptop USB and it reads easily - so why not with USB sticks, flashdrives and SD cards, etc...?

It's like EVs - when you plug them in the charger states "Communicating with vehicle"... ???  Why?  It should just charge after you plug in and make payment and hit 'charge' on the screen.

When I plug in my mobile or laptop, etc. they don't state this - just tells me it's charging 🙂

Toyota need to update things like this and even should have added a Type C USB as an additional option.

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Unfortunately if anything the USB stick compatibility will probably decrease rather than increase as my22 has gone wireless connection.

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6 hours ago, Tech429 said:

This is true.

But I am always suspicious of quotes like this as I like to ask: "why not?"  Yes I know it has always been the case, even with SD Cards too.

Yes I know all about the software, firmware and formatting etc. but surely in this day and age any size drive should be easily read by the unit?  And I also know that USB1 is different to USB2 and USB3, etc.  But I have had external drives of 1TB+ plugged into PC/Laptop USB and it reads easily - so why not with USB sticks, flashdrives and SD cards, etc...?

Computer software works to a given specification. If you exceed that specification it won't work. One possible limitation here is the number of bits being used for sector addressing. Older code might only be using 32-bit values in which case the maximum number of sectors that can be addressed is 2^32 (or if signed values, 2^31, which is very common even when the values cannot be -ve simply because that's the size of the ubiquitous 'int' or 'integer' type that is the number default for most languages). Sectors are usually 512 bytes in size so that's a maximum of 2GB or 1GB. Some storage devices can be formatted with larger sectors but:

* That requires that the reading device be able to use a larger than normal buffer when reading them which is very far from a given.

* I'm pretty sure USB devices have a fixed sector size of 512 bytes.

In this case the limit is a hard limit. If the software uses 32 bits then that's that. It doesn't matter how modern the USB device is that's inserted the host device is simply incapable of counting far enough to reach all the sectors.

Exactly how this manifests will depend on how the software was written. A disk that has 2^32+1 total sectors might appear to 32-bit code to be 1 sector long because it will only read the first 32 bits of that number and won't know anything about the value of 1 stored in the 32 bits alongside but it was never programmed to consider those locations.

Updating the software to use 32-bit values is usually possible but there are consequences around doing it that can make it impractical especially if the hardware doesn't directly support 64-bit values. Software can work around that but it comes with a burden that might be considered unacceptable.

Another possibility for something like an infotainment unit is a programmer imposing a soft limit simply because they are concerned about not having enough memory to process whatever might be stored on such a large device. Their thought process could be along the lines of 'We just can't handle more than 5,000 tracks so lets refuse to mount devices bigger than 8GB to be on the safe side'.

It's anyone's guess really. The bottom line is that computers are only capable of doing what they have been programmed to. If you present them with something beyond what they were designed to they just don't work - sometimes in strange ways. It's the fundamental difference between computers and humans. We can adapt. Computers can only ever do what they've been told to do.

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4 hours ago, AndrueC said:

Computers can only ever do what they've been told to do.

Thank you for that.

It does not seem to happen as often now, but the number of times in the past I have been told, "Sorry Sir, it's a computer error", when I have complained about something. The person I was talking to could not seem to understand when I replied, "No, computers are actually stupid machines. It's the person who has inputted the information to the computer that is wrong".

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11 hours ago, dannyboy413 said:

Thank you for that.

It does not seem to happen as often now, but the number of times in the past I have been told, "Sorry Sir, it's a computer error", when I have complained about something. The person I was talking to could not seem to understand when I replied, "No, computers are actually stupid machines. It's the person who has inputted the information to the computer that is wrong".

Yup. Although when you have the complexity of modern systems the behaviour can be appear to be chaotic. Multithreading where the CPU is actually doing multiple things at once. Connections to remote servers that inevitably vary in latency. Just-in-time-if-ever coding mechanisms. Anticipation mechanisms (where the CPU or the code does something ahead of time in case it's needed).

Sometimes the explanation for why the computer did something is not so easy 🙂

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