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Blind spot mirrors


Newbie47
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If side mirrors are properly adjusted there should not be need for blind spots additional mirrors. Side mirrors best set up is to show only half inch of the car sides doors and the rest of the glass should project the road behind and around. 

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Depends on the car but there is no way to set the mirrors on the Mk4 to eliminate blind spots - The problem is the massive B pillars obstruct a lot of sideways view on both sides and there is an area that the mirrors and just looking do not cover no matter how you set the mirrors.

The Blindspot monitors on the Mk4 are actually needed due to this, whereas on other cars they've just been a annoyance.

I really hope Toyota look at improving visibility in their future cars, as I feel it's something they've overlooked in the pursuit of 5 star NCAP ratings. It's all well and good having A, B and C pillars strong enough to flip a Range Rover Evok :naughty: :laugh:, but it's gotten progressively worse from the Mk1 to the Mk4, and I was a bit disappointed given they supposedly patented a way of making the A-pillars effectively invisible (As opposed to the Mk4's, which can hide an entire articulated lorry coming round a roundabout if you're both going at the right speeds! :eek: )

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32 minutes ago, Cyker said:

Depends on the car but there is no way to set the mirrors on the Mk4 to eliminate blind spots - The problem is the massive B pillars obstruct a lot of sideways view on both sides and there is an area that the mirrors and just looking do not cover no matter how you set the mirrors.

The Blindspot monitors on the Mk4 are actually needed due to this, whereas on other cars they've just been a annoyance.

I really hope Toyota look at improving visibility in their future cars, as I feel it's something they've overlooked in the pursuit of 5 star NCAP ratings. It's all well and good having A, B and C pillars strong enough to flip a Range Rover Evok :naughty: :laugh:, but it's gotten progressively worse from the Mk1 to the Mk4, and I was a bit disappointed given they supposedly patented a way of making the A-pillars effectively invisible (As opposed to the Mk4's, which can hide an entire articulated lorry coming round a roundabout if you're both going at the right speeds! :eek: )

Thanks Cyker - are there any you would recommend?  Don’t mind paying a bit more for them

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Sorry I was talking about the blind-spot monitors, but these are integral to the car (On my one there are indicators on the wing mirrors which light up if they sense a car in the blind-spot)

For blind spot *mirrors*, I second what others have said - The ones that clip on-top of the mirror housing are better than the tiny sticky ones that take up precious mirror space!

It might be worth speaking to some driving instructors as they might have some better real-world and learner-tested recommendations! (They probably all have different views tho'; Some think they're not needed while others swear by them!)

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11 hours ago, bathtub tom said:

I've got one that clamps onto the top of the mirror housing. I didn't fancy one that attaches to the glass as I thought it may obscure more of the already small mirror.

Do you have a link for this mirror?

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Cranking your head round is not an option for some, but of course the responsibility for seeing before you move rests with the driver.

I remember when I rode bikes to bear in mind that I may be in a blind spot, and watch for twitchy behaviour.

You can always tell an incompetent driver from way behind by the way they switch lanes without warning, brake suddenly for no reason, and generally drive as though they have just had a lobotomy.

(Apologies to those who have just had a lobotomy, but should you be driving just yet?)

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1 hour ago, Rhymes with Paris said:

generally drive as though they have just had a lobotomy.

That's 90% of them though. Over a lifetime (end date is pending) I've seen enough that I can tell what most people are about to do several seconds before they apply their brakes or indicate.

Some would call me supernatural, but it's just observation/experience.

In afraid "mirror, signal, manoeuvre" is a thing of driving tests and not a minute after. For most it's a case of "Oh, I want to go there ..." 🙃

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In my case, I'm always watching other cars on the road with me and watching they relative speed to me and predicting if this car is overtaking me or not. In 99% cases it's enough to ride safely, and no blind spot mirror or other gadges needed.

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I use the little circular stick on ones for teaching, yes they take up a portion of the main mirror but they work for blind spots also gives a much wider view when changing direction and a good view of the rear wheel in relation to the kurb when parking, also when forward bay parking you can see that you are between the white  lines, you cannot with main mirrors all for around £3

I had them fitted on all my cars for as long as I can remember 

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On Harley Davidson bikes there is some writing that says something about objects in the mirror may be closer than you think.

I assume that this must be due to the curvature of the mirror lens.

I don't know if this appears on other American bikes or cars, but I do think it's likely a legislation thing, rather than manufacturer led.

Still beats me how a mirror knows what I am thinking though, maybe they are made from crystal ball glass.

 

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I was joking with my friend when he was learning to drive, that you develop psychic powers when you have been driving for a while as that's the only way to avoid all the crazy drivers, pedestrians, cyclists, bikers, dogs, feral wheelie bins etc.!

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2 hours ago, Cyker said:

I was joking with my friend when he was learning to drive, that you develop psychic powers when you have been driving for a while as that's the only way to avoid all the crazy drivers, pedestrians, cyclists, bikers, dogs, feral wheelie bins etc.!

So true, as is what Mikesh says.

I think that after a good while you get so used to reacting without having to think it through, that it does become automatic.

Plus good ol' muscle memory of course, taking care of the controls.

When I get a lift from someone who I don't know whether they are a safe and competent driver or not, I look for things like do they change gear without looking at the gear lever,road positioning, such as pulling up 2 feet from the rear of a parked car to wait for oncoming traffic, then get stuck there and have to reverse.

And are they comfortable having a conversation while driving,of course ,I know to shut up when they are negotiating a tricky junction or roundabout.

But otherwise the aforementioned experienced and confident driver can be on auto pilot, and have a conversation.(not on the phone though) and safely drive.

However,if they are white knuckle gripping the steering wheel like grim death, have the seat pulled forward so far that the airbag would most likely blow their head off, and displaying nervous twitching, then it's thanks, but no thanks to future trips.

So , I would imagine that it's these kinds of drivers that we fortunately recognise from their behaviour on the road, and steer well clear if possible.

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@Rhymes with Paris, know exactly what you mean. I was Driving at 60 in lane 1 on the A1, BSM flashing as a car overtook I was watching him when a van cut in in front of me behind the car that had barely cleared ahead.

Not long after the van pulled off to a left turn.  I must pull the video and see how it unfolded. I have front and rear and full data. 

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That's very common behaviour down here, but you can usually spot the 'weavers' from a long way off, even if only doing cursory glances in the mirrors. What gets me is even if you leave loads of space for them to move into, they just seem pathologically intent on cutting as close to your nose as possible!

I had a fun one where a van cut across all 4 lanes in front of me and then swept all the way back out to lane 4 and was almost rear-ended by another van who was also speeding in lane 4 :laugh: 

 

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These additional mirrors can be distracting too. They serve different purpose  in learners cars as they provide the  instructor with field of view while the main side mirrors can provide the driver. If you attach these to your mirrors just to use for yourself you may find more trouble than help., but anyone can try and see what works better for themselves. Towing a caravan is very different and these mirrors may help but should be removed after stop towing. Brand new car has these convex mirror glasses that works great. 👍

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On 12/7/2022 at 6:24 AM, Newbie47 said:

Can anyone recommend the best blind spot mirrors to attach as my car didn’t come with this feature added.

Thanks in advance 

In my experience, stick on ones are perfectly fine. But...
-  Position it right - many do the mistake of putting them towards the outer edge or top of the mirrors. You should put them in the bottom inside corner, closest to the car. That area of the mirror usually reflects the body of your car and is of little interest. Alternatively, you can put it inside your car towards the front of the window frame / bottom of the A-pillar (depends on the design of your car). Then you don't use up any precious mirror space.

- Right shape - Get the smaller rectangular ones that tilt towards one edge. Round ones are useless. You only want to widen the view in one direction.

image.thumb.png.1f3fe73153ffd1172895154532f35910.png

 

Finally, don't rely on mirrors alone. Turn your head and look before moving. During training, all motorbike riders are taught to do this (along with a sense of paranoia). It's referred to as 'lifesavers' for a very good reason. I wish all drivers did this.

 

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