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2015 Yaris TPMS disable


coldy
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Hi,

Is there a known way to do this? Or a guide on how to scan the sensors and see which ones have failed and tools which work to do it?

Tia

Coldy

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As far as I'm aware, for vehicles first registered from 1st January 2012, tpms is checked for correct operation as part of the MOT, so presumably if it has been disabled, that will be a fail.

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1 minute ago, FROSTYBALLS said:

 for vehicles first registered from 1st January 2012, tpms is checked for correct operation as part of the MOT, so presumably if it has been disabled, that will be a fail.

Shouldn't that be: for newly designed vehicles first registered from 1st January 2012?

My '14 plate, pre uplift hasn't got them, neither has it DRLs, or .....................................

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The original EU requirement was for tpms to be standard on new vehicles with new Type Approval sold from 1st November 2012, and then for all new vehicles sold from 1st November 2014.

So a 14 reg car wouldn't have had to have tpms as standard unless it's Type Approval was obtained after November 2012.

The MOT info was taken from Goodyear's website.

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This is something I was wondering about as well, as my car is one of the very first to have the TPMS system fitted to, being a late (December) 2014 model. As these sensors are fitted to each wheel and they run by batteries, then it would seem obvious that they will eventually run down and the sensor will fail to communicate with the receiver and this will cause the TPMS light to indicate a fault, but I'm not sure if the system would be able to indicate by reading any fault codes which sensor has the bad Battery. Logically, if they were all fitted at the same time when the car was new, then once one Battery fails, then the others will not be far behind. 

When I was having a tyre changed earlier this year, I asked about whether the valve was changed when fitting a new tyre, and was told they cannot be unless the entire sensor is changed as the sensor and valve are part of the same unit. The price of these sensors is not cheap, they are over £100 each and that does not include fitting them, so I suppose in the near future, older Yaris models with TPMS are going to need these sensors replacing potentially at a cost of over £500 to have them all done. As far as I know you cannot just replace the batteries in them like you can in the remote key fobs, the whole sensor has to be replaced, and if it is defective, the car will fail an MOT.

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The car has failed its MOT and the garage have said it has to go to Toyota who can't look at it for two weeks. I'm happy to fit new ones myself but getting reliable information about which ones to fit and how to program them is a nightmare. This seems like a con when the batteries are inbuilt and can't be replaced. Not very Eco is it?

Thanks for the replies, good things to know there. I'll update this if I find the information I need. 

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You can do it with techstream, a decent tire fitter will be able to read each wheel and program it, any garage with a mid to high-end tool should be able to do it

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My local tyre fitter said they could obtain and fit the sensor if I needed them to, and they could pair it to the system as well, as it is not just a case of fitting the sensor, it must be programmed into the TPMS system. From what he told me, they can get aftermarket sensors for a cheaper price than the OEM fitted ones from Toyota. If it was just the one sensor that needed changing it wouldn't be too bad, but just doing the one would mean the others will likely fail soon after. 

It is not possible to replace the sensor yourself as the tyre has to be removed from the wheel to gain access to remove the sensor which sits inside the wheel. 

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That is correct, the tool can scan each wheel it reads the status and Battery level, if its 1 wheel get it done and the car legal then sort it as and when

IIRC the oem valves are around £70 mark

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I just had a quick check, an OEM sensor from Toyota is £142, and then you've got to pay for fitting and programming on top of that. So it aint cheap.

 

Toyota Yaris 2013-2020 Tyre Pressure Monitoring System Tpms - 4260702031VK (toyotadirectparts.co.uk)

 

 

Screenshot 2023-09-26 193110.jpg

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Quick google search . . . .

Some listed as genuine.

eBay even cheaper - scroll down the page from this link

eBay listings

Some video links on how to change TPMS batteries - but really not worth the effort.  Interesting way of getting one out in the first video though!

TPMS Battery instruction videos

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On 9/26/2023 at 7:33 PM, Stevie J said:

I just had a quick check, an OEM sensor from Toyota is £142, and then you've got to pay for fitting and programming on top of that. So it aint cheap.

 

Toyota Yaris 2013-2020 Tyre Pressure Monitoring System Tpms - 4260702031VK (toyotadirectparts.co.uk)

 

 

Screenshot 2023-09-26 193110.jpg

Wow. That seems dear. The owner booked it in and was told around £300 fitted and programmed and was under the impression that was for all four. I’ll have to re check. If that’s for each, I’ll buy the scan tool or see if any local garages can do it. 
 

thank you for all the replies, it’s very much appreciated. 

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Let us know how you got on - if these sensors are going to start failing on older cars, it would be interesting to know how much owners are having to pay out and where they get the work done to rectify the problems. I suspect the sensors may have a limited Battery life, could be up to 10 years or a certain mileage, I dont know, but with my own car approaching 9 years old, I am worried mine are going to be coming up to replacement, and if just one of them is going to cost a small fortune to replace, budgeting for all 4 of them could cost some serious money. If they weren't an MOT tested item, it wouldn't be such a worry, as they aren't really essential, but if our cars are going to fail MOT's if the TPMS light is flashing, and I assume flashing would indicate the system is not receiving inputs from all 4 sensors, the knowing the best place to go and whether aftermarket sensors are any good would be very helpful for those that might read this thread at later times with the same issue.

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I’ve just had the quote confirmed by Toyota. 

total inc VAT will be £423.94:

1 hours labour (it’s 1 hour 30 work but they’re doing it for less apparently) £135 + VAT (£162 total)

Each sensor is £69 + VAT, I need 3 of them so that’s £207 + VAT

Fitting kit £11.28

thats only for three sensors which I don’t think is ideal. The tools to program them on Amazon only seem to work with that brands sensors, and I can’t find where they’re sold. I’m leaning more towards doing this myself now. I’m not paying for it as it’s not my car, but I think it’s a unnecessary expense. Another way to get money out of motorists. 

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A Google search found this site where disconnecting/adding switch to the TPMS system allows it to be switched off to stop the dash warning light from illuminating. Primarily useful if you have two sets of rims for summer/winter driving but the TPMS can only register  4 sensors, making swapping rims more inconvenient.

Disabling TPMS and Dash Warning

May help someone get through an MOT until they can get sensors replaced.

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38 minutes ago, jthspace said:

A Google search found this site where disconnecting/adding switch to the TPMS system allows it to be switched off to stop the dash warning light from illuminating. Primarily useful if you have two sets of rims for summer/winter driving but the TPMS can only register  4 sensors, making swapping rims more inconvenient.

Disabling TPMS and Dash Warning

May help someone get through an MOT until they can get sensors replaced.

That only works for the older Yaris which has a different system. The newer cars use a different system so I’m currently working out how to replace all 4 sensors and reprogrammed them. I think I’ve worked it out, I’ll let you know tomorrow hopefully. 

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I think the MOT tester would be looking to turn on the ignition and look for the TPMS light coming on for the test sequence, like all the warning lights do when you first power up, and then they go out one by one. I think if the TPMS is disabled or the lamp itself removed, that would be an instant fail as the TPMS light would not come on when first turning the ignition on. The MOT tester is looking for correct sequence of warning light illumination when first turning on the ignition. The same goes for the MIL lamp (the orange engine symbol) - the tester will fail the car if the light doesn't come on during ignition power up sequence, as someone could have tampered with it to hide the fact that the light was one due to a faulty emissions component.

MOT testers are not stupid and can usually tell when owners have been tampering with the car's MOT'able warning systems and warning lights.

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I seem to think it would have cost about £200/wheel to have the TPMS replaced by Toyota (I always over-estimate costs though). Mine got to 8 years old without any problems. They are "supposed" to be good for 10 years, but YMMV.

I wouldn't disable it. No point, and AFAIK, it would be illegal. If you crashed due to a flat tyre, and they found the TPMS inoperative due to tampering, it could invalidate your insurance, too, as well as get you into trouble.

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From what I’ve found the TPMS systems have only been mandated since a certain year. The older systems seem to have been bypassed by folk to come on at initial start up and the then go off. That tricks been around for a while. 
 

I think if someone has an accident due to a flat tyre, they weren’t concentrating, if you’ve ever had a flat it’s hard not to notice. Tpms systems were bought in for economy reasons, the argument being that correctly inflated tyres would be more efficient. Although sourcing the materials, implementing them on every vehicle and supplying spares and the energy for repairs must be quite considerable. Im lucky enough to have been driving since the time when people were trusted enough to check their own tyres. 

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