Jump to content
Do Not Sell My Personal Information


Maintenance/improvement Tips - 4.3


anchorman
 Share

Recommended Posts

Difficulty - Easy

Time - about 45 minutes.

Frequency - 10,000 miles or 12 Months

Tools required - 14mm socket and ratchet with extension bar. Filter wrench (examples shown below). Drain container. Jug or measure to re-fill oil. If you decide to remove the sump shield you will need the 10mm socket and a trim tool or screwdriver to pop out the fixing studs. A phillips screwdriver to remove the clips in the access flaps. A torque wrench if you have one.

Oilchangetools.jpg

Parts - 5.9 litres of 5W/30 Semi Synthetic oil (I paid £12.97+VAT for 5 litres). I only use Morris's oil;

http://www.morrislubricants.co.uk/

1 oil filter - 04152-31060, later part No 01452-OR010 - £9.60 inc VAT (See Kingo for discounted price delivered to home address).

This is the proper oil filter socket with cut outs to engage the lugs on the filter housing. Either Google or search eBay and type in "Lexus oil filter socket". Laser do a cheaper pressed steel version.

IMG_0694.jpg

Introduction

The oil not only has the job of lubricating the many moving parts of the engine it also accounts for about 30% of the cooling and has many other functions. These include anti foaming agents and suspension additives that stop dirt from settling and detergents to keep the inside of the engine clean. The viscosity or "thickness" of the oil is determined by a viscosity index number. Thin oil starts at zero and the higher the number the thicker it gets. The oil for the 2.2 D4D is stated as 5W/30. This means that the oil is thin when cold (5W - winter viscosity) and 30 for summer or warm. The oil is able to change its viscosity with temperature as it is fortified with a structure that bulks up as the temperature rises and maintains its lubricating qualities through a wide temperature range.

The oil is in an extremely hostile environment. Inside the engine it is subject to extremes of pressure and temperature. It becomes contaminated with carbon and fuel which escapes in small quantities past the pistons and as the engine cycles through temperature it produces significant amounts of condensation which is also suspended in the oil. Over time these contaminants create quite a corrosive cocktail and so must be renewed periodically to maintain engine life. Healthy oil will significantly improve the lifespan of seals, gaskets and timing chains in addition to major engine components.

If there is one piece of advice that you will benefit from more than any other it is to change the oil at least as specified if not sooner. My RAV has done just less than 13k and is not 2 years old until September but because of the low mileage I have changed the oil 3 times in this period. Generally the lower the mileage the more water gets into the oil and frequent changes are adviseable. Those vehicles doing 10-12k per year or more are less vunerable and can comfortably be left the full year or 10k whichever comes first. The oil and filter change forms the basis of the intermediate service. Even if you have to buy some items to get set up you can then change your own oil and ask your Toyota Centre to do the rest of the service which will cost considerably less.

In summary the oil is the life blood of the engine. If you neglect anything else you risk damage. If you neglect the oil you will definitely ruin the engine.

Procedure

The oil becomes extremely hot so be sure to change the oil when the engine is warm. Warm oil will also drain out of the engine more thoroughly. To help with the clarity of the photos I put the car onto ramps but it is possible to do it on a level surface or to aid the process slightly you can drive it onto sturdy blocks of wood. Do not use concrete blocks or bricks as they can crumble under the weight. It is possible to gain extra access by driving the drivers side wheel onto a convenient kirb. The onus on gaining more access safely is with you!

If you have sensitive skin use barrier cream or disposable gloves and have a good supply of rags for any spillage.

Accessing the sump plug and filter is done through 2 flaps in the sump shield. The left flap with the red arrow points to the filter and the right green arrow points to the sump plug. To undo the flaps unscrew the phillips screw carefully then pop out the stud with a trim tool or screw driver;

Accessflapsarrowed.jpg

You can see much better in this picture with the sump shield removed. Use the 14mm socket to remove the sump plug;

Undoplug2.jpg

and carefully position your container to catch the oil;

Undoplug.jpg

While that is draining get ready to change the filter. The box comes with the new rubber O rings and also a drain adapter for draining the filter which would otherwise result in oil all over the place;

Newfilter.jpg

Find a piece of hose or pipe to fit the adapter. Remove the plug in the filter case with the 14mm socket;

Undofilterdrain.jpg

then push the adapter and pipe into the filter which will lift a valve and drain the oil into your container;

Filterdrain.jpg

When the oil has drained remove the adapter which will automatically withdraw the old sealing ring> Use a socket or filter wrench to unscrew the filter housing;

UndoFilter.jpg

Remove the housing and filter and I worked in a tray on the bench. Drain and wipe out the filter housing with clean rags. Remove the old sealing ring and fit the new one. When you fit the new one do not roll it on but stretch carefully over the filter housing then work your way down to the groove. A twisted seal may leak oil;

Cleanfilter.jpg

Lightly oil the new ring with clean engine oil. Clean out the housing on the engine with clean rags. Fit the new filter then screw the assembly back onto the engine. The torque is 40Nm or 30ft/lbs. If you don't have a torque wrench the filter needs to be nipped up tight but don't go mad! Clean the filter plug and fit the new O ring. Lightly oil the ring with clean engine oil and screw the plug back into the filter housing. The torque is 12.5 Nm or 9ft/lbs. Again if you do not have a torque wrench this only needs nipping with a short socket bar or 14mm spanner.

Clean the sump plug and refit it to the sump. If the sealing washer is damaged in any way fit a new one (ask Kingo for a new one when ordering the filter). The torque for the plug is 38Nm or 28 ft/lbs or again if you don't have a torque wrench tighten it securely with the 14mm socket and ratchet.

Fill the engine with 5.9 litres of 5W/30 semi Synthetic oil. In this photo I have removed the engine cover (it just pulls off) for clarity;

IMG_1672.jpg

With the oil added ensure the gearbox is in neutral and start the engine. Watch the dash board to see that no engine warnings are displayed. When the oil pressure rises in the engine you will hear the engine note change. Go back underneath and check the filter and sump plug are not leaking. Leave the engine running for 5 minutes then check again for leaks. If all is OK refit the flaps. Newer engines will use more oil than older ones so check the oil frequently with the dip stick until consumption has been established.

To reset the oil service indicator do as follows;

Set the multi-information display to TRIP A.

Turn the ignition switch off.

Press and hold the ODO / TRIP switch, and turn the ignition switch on (IG).

After turning the ignition switch on (IG), keep holding the switch for at least 5 seconds. The reset procedure is complete.

Dispose of the oil considerately. All local authority waste disposal sites will take waste oil so will most local garages if you have a good relationship with one. The oily rags and old filter should be disposed of in the same way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Hi Anchorman,

what size is the filter wrench on your photo? Ive accumulated a few different sizes over the years but don't seem to have one for the RAV filter.

I used a strap wrench last time, I think the job will be easier with the proper tool.

Frank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Frank

The socket size is 64mm (2.5 inch). Its the size of the filter that is quite popular on lots of Toyotas (Corollas etc).

I was limited to 10 photos in the post but while changing the oil I did try other wrenches and given it should not be that tight I think most popular ones would fit. Here I photographed an alternative;

Filterwrench-1.jpg

Hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 11 months later...

For Avensis 2.2 d4d 2008 on, the size of the filter cup wrench is 65mm 14 flute 64mm does not fit as i found out to my cost theese are available on flea bay in single form as most tool shops only have this particular size in a £43.00 kit hope this helps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For Avensis 2.2 d4d 2008 on, the size of the filter cup wrench is 65mm 14 flute 64mm does not fit as i found out to my cost theese are available on flea bay in single form as most tool shops only have this particular size in a £43.00 kit hope this helps.

Thanks for this. It reminded me that one day Frank Ashworth asked the same question and luckily I have kept the message. It seems that some sockets are being produced that are slightly smaller than 64mm. I bought mine in the USA where you can buy oil filters and sockets in any supermarket!!!;

Hi,

I have a 64mm filter wrench, that seems too small do you think it could be 65mm?

http://rav4world.com/forums/viewtopic.php?...ight=oil+filter

most of the small filter sockets I have were bought for motorcycles I,m sure I had a 65 mm It fits most of the Honda range I probably lent it out (you Know the rest)

I will ring my local automotive tool supplier tomorrow to see if he has one in stock there only about a fiver.

cheers for now

Frank

Frank

I went out with a vernier today and it is 64mm across the flats. The flats are right at the bottom so your socket will need to have its flats at the end???

Obviously if you get a 65mm socket it will fit but I don't fully understand why your 64 mm socket doesn't fit.

Cheers

Sorry, I didn't want you crawling under your car to measure your filter housing but it was very kind of you (it saved me measuring mine) I took my socket to work today and measured it it measures between 63,3 and 63,7 A/F obviously the reason it wont fit!It is stamped up 64/14

It has been used over the years on various cars and don't recall ever having problems the filters I used it on must have been slightly under size.

my local supplier as agreed for me try a couple of sockets on my filter before I buy one.

thanks again

Frank

Thanks Taximan. Be on the lookout folks. It might be better to get your socket from a local spares shop wehere you can take it back if there are problems.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi everybody,

I ended up buying one at 65mm it was only a few quid from the local tool store, I'M just in the process of buying another one for my motorbike I don't seem to have one to fit that either, going to end up with quiet a collection of the things, :rolleyes:

Frank

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi everybody,

I ended up buying one at 65mm it was only a few quid from the local tool store, I'M just in the process of buying another one for my motorbike I don't seem to have one to fit that either, going to end up with quiet a collection of the things, :rolleyes:

Frank

Heyup Frank

How you doing? :thumbsup: If you are prepared to do a few of your own jobs you will soon get your money back so keep collecting!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

Hi Anchrman.

Any plans on detailing the fuel and air filter replacement? Just got a Toyota Rav4 D4D 2.2 turbo diesel model ALA30R-AWFGYW, Engine 2ADFTV. My first diesel motor so would appreciate the help. Always did the "small" jobs myself but had the help of a workshop manual.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi and welcome to the club. The fuel filter instructions are pinned and the air filter is very easy. Just undo the 3 clips and lift the top of the filter to pivot open at the front. Pop the filter out and when putting it back, hook the back of the cover in and pivot it down again. Finally fasten the 3 clips.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Just a quick update on this. I changed the oil and filter on mine but had difficulty resetting the oil maintenance message as I have the smart entry/start with no ignition key. The instructions above didn't work. This is how I did It.

Set the ODO trip to 'A'

Turn the engine off.

Do NOT touch the brake pedal.

Hold in the ODO button

Touch the start button briefly and let go

Still holding the ODO button Hold in the start button for about 5 seconds.

A countdown appears on the display (flashing dashes) and then it shows 0000

Job done!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I read that 0W20 improves your mpg by 2%. Does anyone else use this instead of 5W30? Plus I've used Mobil 1 0W40 for 6 years on my 98 E320 and the engine looks pristine clean at 150k. Would the same effect apply to Mobil 1 0W20?

My 2010 Rav4 is only at 30k miles right now so I don't know the real effect yet.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

I decided to change the oil an filter on my newly acquired 2006 Rav4 and found this guide to be very good.

I have a problem though. At some time the 14mm bolt in the end of the filter has been rounded off (by some over enthusiastic jockey with an air tool probably) and is also very tight.

So the question is can I simply unscrew the whole filter body with the filter tool mentioned here and deal with the rounded bolt head on the bench?


I tentatively tried this but it seems very tight, I don't want to break anything.

Or is it a long through bolt that has to be removed first?

Any other photos of the item would be helpful too.

Thanks,


Bill.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I decided to change the oil an filter on my newly acquired 2007 Rav4 and found this guide to be very good.

I have a problem though. At some time the 14mm bolt in the end of the filter has been rounded off (by some over enthusiastic jockey with an air tool probably) and is also very tight.

So the question is can I simply unscrew the whole filter body with the filter tool mentioned here and deal with the rounded bolt head on the bench?

I tentatively tried this but it seems very tight, I don't want to break anything.

Or is it a long through bolt that has to be removed first?

Any other photos of the item would be helpful too.

Thanks,

Bill.

Hi Bill,

see thread: http://www.toyotaownersclub.com/forums/topic/147671-oil-filter-jammed/

I think you are probably talking about the same problem.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I decided to change the oil an filter on my newly acquired 2007 Rav4 and found this guide to be very good.

I have a problem though. At some time the 14mm bolt in the end of the filter has been rounded off (by some over enthusiastic jockey with an air tool probably) and is also very tight.

So the question is can I simply unscrew the whole filter body with the filter tool mentioned here and deal with the rounded bolt head on the bench?

I tentatively tried this but it seems very tight, I don't want to break anything.

Or is it a long through bolt that has to be removed first?

Any other photos of the item would be helpful too.

Thanks,

Bill.

Hi Bill,

see thread: http://www.toyotaownersclub.com/forums/topic/147671-oil-filter-jammed/

I think you are probably talking about the same problem.

Thanks for the link, that's what I wanted to know!

I was afraid the 'plug' was a long through bolt and I am not known for a delicate touch when giving the wrench a good bit of welly.

Bill.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A while ago I [attachment=14638:front discs 005.JPG was looking for what I refered to a infill panel, anyway I made one and behind this panel is the oil filter, and there lies the reason it was missing, you can get an ordinary filter wrench on the housing

More than one way to skin a cat eh? Thanks for this I might take off the paneling as the filter body appears to be so tight, should give better access and perhaps I'll try an ordinary filter wrench too. Might have more 'feel'.

Bill.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...

Thanks again Anchorman!

If it helps anyone I got the Sealey VS7112 "Oil Filter Cap Wrench" which worked perfectly http://www.tool-net.co.uk/p-371800/sealey-vs7112.html?gclid=Cj0KEQiA9eamBRDqvIz_qPbVteABEiQAnIBTEFPcizU640lv6v95QaYMA6IwcneaUq24xlI530JOql4aAuZA8P8HAQ

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share





×
×
  • Create New...




Forums


News


Membership