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  1. MikeSh

    MikeSh

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/23/2014 in all areas

  1. Hi, I have identified a problem with my front o/s wheel bearing on my 2004 2.0 D4D. The car has amassed some 207,000 miles, which is pretty good going. I have reasonable mechanical skills, so I have purchased a replacement front wheel bearing c£35 and a small 6 ton press £45. However, reading the manual I note that there is an Inner Raceway, which according to good practice is normally replaced. This inner raceway is a bit of a pig to get off (not having the SST) requiring cutting a diagonal groove, then chiselling out. My questions are: 1. Where I can get this part from? 2. Given the mileage of the car is it actually worth replacing, in other words can I just replace the bearing itself? many thanks
    1 point
  2. Not got chance to test this yet (as I can't find my non working keyfob!) but a lot of people have had problems with their keyfobs recently. I've got a friend who works for the RAC and whilst he was round I got him to look up keyfobs etc for Celicas and there was a load of information which had been given to the RAC by Toyota Technicians. Anyway the main points were: FAULT: KEYFOB STOPPED WORKING BUT LED LIGHTS UP AND BATTERIES ARE OK Step one. Resync - Stand near the car and press both buttons together and hold them down for two seconds (this will only work with the car it was intended to work with) Step two (if step one failed to work). Reset Circuitry - Press and hold the furthest button away from the chain (arm button) now whilst keeping it held undo the screw on the back and remove the back cover - this will inturn remove the battery. Keep the arm button pressed down, wait atleast 10 seconds and then replace the back cover. Now release the arm button and test the remote. If it fails to operate try Step 1 again. Step three. (If all else fails) Unlock the car with the key, the alarm will sound for 30 seconds, during this time get in and close the door and turn the key to ACC. Wait until the alarm stops. Then start the car, this will temporarily disable the alarm for the journey. When you get to your destination open the door before you stop the engine. Once you close the door the alarm will rearm itself I will try Step 2 as soon as I find the duff Fob! I guess you could use the time that the alarm is temporarily disabled to open the bonnet and disconnect the siren. To save the 30 seconds of noise when you return to the car - but I also presume you would still have to wait the 30 seconds to start it??? Hope this helps someone - might be worth being put as a pinned topic if it works
    1 point
  3. First of all let me write this: Whoever designed the window-lock feature on the 2007 Auris had no kids! Otherwise he would know that the way the window lock switch is implemented is more of a problem than a solution. The issue is this: When you lock the windows so that the kids in the back cannot open and close the window as they please, you (the driver) don't have control either!!! Only the driver's window is functional. You cannot operate the other 3 windows from the driver's 4-switch panel unless you unlock them. The same goes for the co-driver; when you lock the windows for the kids, his/her window is also disabled. This causes frustration and it distracts the driver's attention. What I wanted was to be able to control all 4 windows, lock the windows for my kids in the back and allow the co-driver to use her window. I contacted Toyota about this and they told me that there was nothing they could do. Well, here's what I did: My first attempt to solve this problem was by removing the connector from the switch of the rear window. To pull the switch out of the door, put a knife between the switch and the upholstery and gently raise the switch. The anchor points are shown here: The problem with this solution is that while the child cannot operate the window, neither can the driver! Both switches, the single one in the rear door and the respective switch of the driver's panel are no longer working... So, removing the connector from the switch was not a good solution. So, I put the connector back to the switch and thought about removing individual cables from the connector. Removing an individual cable from the connector requires a needle or a very small flat screwdriver. Using the needle or the screwdriver, you have to raise the small plastic clip that's holding the cable in place and at the same time pull the cable out of the connector. The connector itself has five coloured cables. I noticed that the middle one was thinner that the other 4. I removed this cable (in my case it was pink) and reattached the connector to the switch. It worked like a charm. The window can now be operated by the driver's 4-switch panel but not by the switch in the rear door. My problem was solved and it took me no more than 10 minutes to do it! Before putting the switch back to its place, I put some insulating tape around the removed cable to protect it. That's it. I hope this modification helps someone with the same problem. Thanks for reading.
    1 point
  4. Fabio, There are a few Avensis in a breakers yard in nearby Erith. One is a vvti similar to yours. If you and your mechanic can get there, you might be able to remove it from the car. My mate Waqar has described what I said about the horn position, better than me. Zero your trip counter at fill up a few times and see how much fuel you are adding, with the distance. Since your car is an automatic, the fuel consumption will be consistent with the way you use the throttle. Waqar's view regarding the oil usage and changes are valid and from experience. He will be the best of the current members for advice, though others will be around to assist. Konrad
    1 point
  5. "The car only has three wheels"........ ........"We didn't advertise it with four wheels, and that is reflected in the price" Is it just me, or is there a slight problem with that argument?
    1 point
  6. MMTs (and other makers' equivalents) have had a mixed reaction. There have been/are some reliability issues with selector mechanisms stiffening with age or control modules failing - both expensive to fix. Of course for every failure we hear of there are probably hundreds or more that don't fail, so I don't know if they are really much less reliable than other transmissions. The main 'problem' seems to be that they don't act like a standard automatic - there is a prolonged loss of drive while changing gear (as there is with a normally driven manual) and some/many drivers simply can't accept this and complain bitterly about jerkiness (passengers don't notice it, only drivers - I think because they aren't normally pushing a clutch pedal at the time of change). Some try to 'improve' it by wiggling the throttle about while it's changing which probably just makes things worse. I found it did take quite a while to get used to the gear changes, but I've had no issues once getting past that. My wife has never driven manual cars and has never had a problem with it. (We currently have Yaris 1.4D MMT since about 4 years and I also had an Aygo MMT for a couple of years. Both perform(ed) adequately.) It's not a dual mass clutch, it's a dual mass flywheel. The flywheel is effectively split into two discs with a spring coupling between them - one part is on the crankshaft, the other connecting with the clutch. Some makes seem to suffer with spring failures at not very high mileages which is why they have a bad press. Quite a big job to change to a 'standard' flywheel (even if they are available). I've never seen a post here on the Yaris Club about DMFs, so I don't think they are a big problem on these cars (yet).
    1 point
  7. Get in!! Nice one. I only thought of that cos a mate had an old lotus that wouldn't start until the battery was charged, it turned out to be the boot light switch. Nice one! Battery in my Luton van is over 7 yrs old now...
    1 point
  8. MikeSH, or anyone! I too heard about the "nightmare" with MMT gearboxes. Test drove one when the wife was looking for a Yaris diesel in April, and no problem, though it was only a few mile test drive, Is the "problem" still there even if you drive it on the sequential selector side ie move the gearstick yourself - forward for up and backward for down? After driving the wife 58 plate Yaris diesel with manual box, I was smitten, declared myself retired (I was self employed and doing professional carpet cleaning at 67 years old), got myself a 59 plate Yaris diesel, manual, and absolutely love it. Re the dual mass clutch, I know with other makes of cars, some owners are putting a "standard" clutch in when its due for renewing. Whether this is viable or beneficial/detrimental with the diesel Yaris I do not know.
    1 point
  9. Hi, Welcome to the club... Enjoy
    1 point
  10. The auto is an MMT which is a manual box with automatic electric shifting, so the actual gears, flywheel, etc, are the same as the manual. I've not heard of problems with DMFs on these, but there's plenty of hate for the MMT, so you'll probably want to get a manual :) DPFs came in about 2010. From a discussion a few weeks ago it seems they may be concurrent with the change to a 6-speed gearbox, so if you stick to 5-speed cars you'll probably avoid a DPF.
    1 point
  11. Blimey, better watch out mate - It looks like someone was firing broadhead arrows at your iQ!!!
    1 point
  12. Hello, When the tire is damaged by a nail, there is a cheap and excellent way to repair it properly : just buy this type of kit : http://www.amazon.fr/dp/B00BQWV2Z8/ref=pe_386181_40444391_TE_item http://www.amazon.fr/trousse-doutils-tubeless-ponction-r%C3%A9paration/dp/B008U0HFJG/ref=aag_m_pw_dp?ie=UTF8&m=A1QXJ8JQ1XG0TA (the same thing must exist in Amazon UK) you retrieve the nail, drill a nice hole with the supplied punch, then insert a rubber wire with the supplied needle (there is also some liquid sealing, et voilà ! I always keep that kit in my cars. I can guaranty it is very efficient. Right now there are 2 repairs with that kit in my IQ's tires, and it perfecltly works!
    1 point
  13. It works!!!! I couldn't believe it, I found the dead key fob which hasn't worked for months (I tried everything ever posted before to try and get it to work without any luck!) I held the arm button down, took the back off (which takes the battery out) waited 20 seconds, then replaced the battery and back. I then pressed both buttons and held them down for about 5 seconds - nothing appeared to happen - then I pressed the lock button and it worked and so did unlock! So I've gone from having a dead remote to a working one. As it works and a lot of people seem to have this problem can we pin this info Cheers
    1 point
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