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  1. 5 points
    Difficulty - Medium Time - The are 2 stages, one to adjust the brakes themselves and the other to adjust the cable. Cable 10 minutes Including brakes 1 hour. Tools - Jack and wheel brace, flat blade screwdriver, phillips No2 screwdriver, 10mm socket and suitable driver. Trim tool if available. 2 X 10mm spanners. Introduction The handbrake on all 4.2 RAVs is of the "drum in hat/exclusive" type. This consists of a small diameter drum brake which is positioned in the boss of the rear brake disc. Although a handbrake could be incorporated into the disc brake, these are becoming less popular because they rely entirely upon clamping force which requires high actuation force and are exposed to contamination if the vehicle should be used off road. Although the parking brake is efficient, it should be remembered that it is solely a static brake and should never be used dynamically because it is at a huge mecanical disadvantage - a tiny brake inside a large wheel. Even applying it just as the wheels are coming to a stand will eventually cause excessive wear of the components. As it is a static brake the linings should last indefinitely and the brake requires little maintenance. Once adjusted after the linings have bedded to the drum it should normally not be required again for the life of the vehicle. Occasionally the drum brakes may become inefficient due to lack of use, a build up of contaminants or incorrect use. If the linings have become wet (when the vehicle is waded to the depth of 300 - 500mm) the brake will be submerged and can be dried by applying the handbrake with a force of 10kgs for a distance not exceeding 400m at 30mph. If the linings have been replaced they can be bedded by using the same procedure but repeating the process after a cooling period of 1 minute a number of times as required. In this case the brake should be re-adjusted when completed. Once the brakes have been adjusted for the first time, any subsequent adjustment required is likely to be as a result of cable stretch. If you have no reason to suspect the brakes need further adjustment (you haven't renewed the linings etc) then it is acceptable to adjust the cable only. The cost for having the handbrake adjusted can vary. I have heard reports ranging from £25 - £65 which I presume depends on whether the foundation drum brakes have been adjusted or only the cable. Procedure To adjust the foundation parking brake shoes; Working on level ground safely chock the front wheels and release the hand brake. Observing all the usual precautions, jack up and remove one rear wheel. Ideally the vehicle should be jacked and supported on axle stands but if the supplied vehicle jack is used under no circumstances place any part of your body under the vehicle. As the disc is not fixed to the hub it is necessary to secure it by taking two of the wheel nuts and running them up to the disc. The hand brake adjuster is accessible through a rubber bung in the disc. Using a screwdriver, prize out the bung and rotate the disc (it will be stiff as you have to turn the transmission) until the toothed adjuster is visible - it will be somewhere near the bottom ; Use the screwdriver to engage the teeth of the adjuster; To adjust the brake you need to turn the adjuster as shown to expand the shoes; Turn the adjuster until it is no longer possible to move the disc then turn it backwards until the disc is just free. It is OK to hear it rubbing but it should not be tight. Turn the disc a full revolution to make sure there are no tight spots. When complete refit the rubber bung and the roadwheel. Go around and repeat the process at the other wheel but when finished do not lower the wheel to the ground. To adjust the hand brake cable; Go inside the car and use a trim tool or screwdriver to prize the back of the gear stick gaiter upward; The front of the gaiter is hooked under the lower facia so just pull it back to disengage and lift it up over the gearstick but do not try to remove it. Use the phillips screwdriver to remove the 2 screws from the front of the centre console; Fold down the back of the console and remove the cup holders to reveal the 2 fixing bolts. Use a 10mm socket and extension to remove the bolts then lift off the console. Note - it will be necessary to reach under and unplug the wire from the cigar lighter. Now with the console removed the handbrake and cable is very easy to see; Use the 2 X 10mm spanners to unlock the adjusting nut. Hold the bottom nut still and undo the top nut anti clockwise. This photo is from a 4.3 but it is the same; Now turn the bottom nut clockwise to tension the cable. The specification calls for 7 - 9 clicks with a pulling force of 20kgs (44 lbs) - thats a heavy pull! The main thing is not to over adjust it so you should still feel some free play at the bottom of the lever travel. Keep adjusting and testing little by little. If you start at the bottom and pull, you should not feel any resistance until about the third click. As a check go back to the jacked up wheel and check that it turns freely. Replace all of the trim in the reverse order remembering to re-connect that cigar lighter. Lower the remaining wheel and don't forget to finally tighten the road wheel nuts to the specified torque of 76 ft/lbs. As a final check take the vehicle to an incline where it would normally just roll and check to see that it does so in both directions. For those that might prefer the handbrake to be on with just one click don't forget that if it binds it will get hot and cause a lot of damage so whatever happens make sure you do these checks to make sure it is free.
  2. 5 points
    This post is designed to give a basic overview of modern Toyota Diesel engines and their commonly troublesome components: How does a Diesel engine work? Firstly Diesel is not as flammable as Petrol. Diesel engines don’t have spark plugs to ignite the fuel, but to bring about combustion they require heat. If you put your finger over the end of a foot pump and pump it, your finger will become hot. This is due to compression of the air trapped inside the pump (the air molecules have less space to move about and collide with each other more frequently causing energy to be given off in the form of heat). The same thing happens in a diesel engine: as the piston moves upwards, the air trapped inside is compressed, causing it to heat up (the temperature reached is circa 400 degrees C). Just before the piston reaches the top of its' stroke, the pump and injectors spray a very fine mist of diesel into the piston chamber. The intense heat of the trapped air in the piston causes the diesel to ignite, forcing the piston down and producing the power stroke which goes through the engine via the gearbox / wheels etc etc and off you go. What are Glow Plugs? When internal sensors detect that the core of the engine block has reached a certain designated temperature, or when a certain amount of time elapses, the glowplug relay switches off the "wait-to-start" light. A pre-heating cycle usually lasts for 2 to 5 seconds. The driver then turns the key to the "start" position. The glowplug relay switches off the glowplugs after the engine is running. In some newer cars, glow plugs continue to operate for up to 180 seconds after engine start to keep the engine within emissions regulations, as combustion efficiency is greatly reduced when the engine is very cold. Link http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glowplug As glow plugs wear out the vehicle will be more difficult to start, run poorly and produce a white/bluey smoke. Glow Plugs are a reasonably cheap to replace. What is D4D? D4D is Toyota’s version of Common Rail Diesel. The term "common rail" refers to the fact that all of the fuel injectors are supplied by a common fuel rail which is nothing more than a pressure accumulator where the fuel is stored at high pressure. This accumulator supplies multiple fuel injectors with high pressure fuel. Modern common rail systems, are governed by an engine control unit (ECU) which opens each injector electronically rather than mechanically. What are Injectors? Fuel injectors are a key part of modern automotive systems, as they're responsible for getting fuel into the engine in a precise, orderly and carefully engineered pattern. Unfortunately, the conditions we drive in are not ideal. Pollution is in the air, and fuel can be contaminated with water, dirt particles and other debris. Regularly changing your fuel filter (according to change interval in your service book) will help keep debris from circulating. You can also add fuel injector cleaner to your fuel tank, which may help solve running issues. Doing this at regular intervals of 10,000 miles or so might provide more cleansing than your engine actually needs, but it shouldn’t harm the system. Injector Cleaner can't improve your car beyond its original factory spec. When injectors fail there are generally two approaches to repair, take the vehicle to a main dealer and have the whole set (£1000+) replaced or find a diesel specialist who may be able to replace or repair individual injectors (circa £250 each) after testing. Fuel Injector problem symptoms include, poor starting, rough running, loss of power, black or white smoke. It is generally known that injectors will need attention after 100,000 miles. What is a Turbo? Turbochargers are a type of forced induction system. They compress the air flowing into the engine. The advantage of compressing the air is that it lets the engine squeeze more air into a cylinder, and more air means that more fuel can be added. Therefore, you get more power from each explosion in each cylinder. A turbocharged engine produces more power overall than the same engine without the turbocharging. When Turbo’s are failing they will typically cause the car to have a loss of power, excessive smoke and in some cases a high pitched whine. Turbo’s can often be repaired bya turbo specialists or replaced with a new unit, obviously a repair is cheaper. What is an SCV? SCV's (Suction Control Valves) are used in Common Rail diesel engines to control the pressure of the fuel in the accumulator. The pressure is varied by the ECU by controlling how much fuel the pump feeds into the accumulator, replacing the fuel as it is delivered into the engine by the injectors. Low pressure for the injectors at idle, high pressure at maximum power. Electrically operated, SCVs can need to open and close at up to 200 times per second and if they stick or fail to open properly then poor running, starting and power loss can occur. Sticking when hot is often cited as a cause of hot starting problems. D4D pumps may have one or two of these valves depending on the type of pump fitted, this is important when ordering the correct parts. Vehicles commonly affected by this have the 1CD-FTV 2.0 D4D Engine 2000-2005, found on RAV4/Avensis/Corolla built between these dates. This article SCV's on the RAV4 Forum provides an overview of the location and parts on a two valve pump. These parts are typically £250 to replace + fitting if required. What is an EGR Valve? Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is a nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions reduction technique used in modern engines, EGR works by recirculating a portion of an engine's exhaust gas back to the engine cylinders. After a while the gases containing dirty, sooty carbons start to cover and coat the intake area and valves causing the air to fuel ratio to become unbalanced thus resulting in more black smoke being emitted from the exhaust. This black smoke is then drawn back into the air intake via the EGR valve. A vicious cycle then starts with the engine producing more smoke and sootier carbons being drawn into the intake, a major problem. Symptoms of EGR issues include lack of power, engine hesitancy and then a surge of power followed by black sooty smoke. A fall in fuel economy may also occur. On most Toyota engines the valve is easily removed and cleaned, a dealer will charge an hours labour to do the same job. If the valve fails it will cost around £300 to be supplied and fitted by Mr T. If the vehicle is used continually then carbon clogging could eventually lead to head gasket failure on AD engines, please review the attached document to see if your car has one of these engines.AD Head Gaskets.pdf A simple method of trying to keep the EGR valve clean is to drive the vehicle (once warm) hard by bringing the revs near to the red line, this will result in black soot leaving the exhaust, continue this until the soot no longer appears. This should be a weekly event. This is also known as an Italian Tune Up. Personally as my 2.2 D4D Verso is out of warranty i clean the EGR every 10k, this a superb guide http://www.toyotaown...howtopic=106241 What is D-Cat? D-CAT (Diesel Clean Advanced Technology) is Toyota’s version of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) which is a device designed to remove soot from the exhaust gas of a diesel engine. The soot created by the engine is burnt off during the regeneration process, this process uses fuel which is added by an additional injector, this additional fuel usage reduces MPG when compared with vehicles that dont have a DPF. The regeneration process occurs at road speeds higher than can generally be attained during urban usage ,vehicles driven exclusively at low speeds in urban traffic will require periodic trips at higher speeds to clean out the DPF. On cars with a very high sixth gear the engine revs may be too low to generate sufficient exhaust temperature for regeneration. Occasional harder driving in lower gears should be sufficient to burn off the soot in such cases. With this type of DPF regeneration will be initiated by the ECU every 300 miles or so depending on vehicle use and will take 10 to 15 minutes at 40MPH+ to complete. You shouldn't notice anything other than perhaps a puff of white smoke from the exhaust when the process is completed. If the DPF doesn’t regenerate properly eventually a warning light will be displayed and the vehicle should be taken to a main dealer. Continued usage past this point may destroy the DPF completely so it must be replaced, this will be very expensive (£1000+). DPF Continued If your car is type approved and registered after the date below it will have a DPF to meet the EU Emissions, things can get very complicated here. Vehicles are often built long before being registered, so you could purchase a 2010 car that was a 2009 model. Its important to ask what model year your car is and which emission standard it meets. Its possible to be driving a 10/60 or even an 11 Reg thats not Euro 5 (V) if the car was built long before being registered. Euro 5 (V) Emissions Standard Commenced - September 2009 If you only drive low mileages in town do not buy a Diesel with a DPF. A Petrol is more suitable. Modern Diesels are very complex machines, following manufacturer servicing guidelines is essential as is using the correct oils, fluids and drivers checking levels frequently. The issues mentioned above are not restricted to Toyota's, all manufacturers have these issues and probably more of them. Hopefully this is useful to people Please PM me if any of this requires amending.
  3. 4 points
    Having use USB memory sticks on my Mk1 Avensis with Sony, CD changer and Connects2 for many years, I wanted the same on my T27. My original post: http://www.toyotaownersclub.com/forums/topic/169513-added-usbbluetooth-adaptor-to-w53828-in-avensis-mk3/ I choose the LaPower Adapter as it had the additional Bluetooth A2DP, at a cheaper cost than the usual Connects2 and Xcarlink, plus the supplier is UK based. The USB/Bluetooth kit . The trim removal kit The first is to look at the many guides for the radio removal on the internet. http://www.handsfree.lt/index.php?route=product/download/download&download_id=13 Remove the glovebox. With the trim removal tool I obtain from eBay I carefully worked on the top vent. then the passenger side trim near the heater controls. Then remove the surround to access the lower screws securing the stereo . . Remove the four screws to access the rear of the stereo. Pull the stereo forward and slightly to the left to pass the right trim, which is only loosened and not removed. Looking at the rear the Cd changer socket 12 pin (6+6) should be empty . Route the cable for the adapter from the glove box area, as close to the firewall as possible, behind the vertical reinforce bar and insert into the CD changer socket. At this point, reposition the stereo and connect the adapter to the cable. Get a memory stick with music and test the system. I used mine from my other system and they all worked fine. Better to find out now than later after putting the car back together. I decided to leave the adapter in the glovebox for now but may make changes. Next was to install the microphone and carefully rand the cable along the front of the roof lining, tucking along the front of the A pillar close to the windscreen - this avoids interfering with the curtain airbag! Everything was put back and the sound quality is very good and clear. Most of the functions can be operated by the steering wheel controls. I have two mobiles and the second is connected to the adapters Bluetooth. Calls can be taken or rejected by the steering wheel Next or Previous buttons. The other phone is connected to the cars Bluetooth. I may get an USB/Aux extension cable and mount in a blank hole in the dashboard measure the blanking plate and compared to measurements of the two I found. They both measure the same 33mm x 21/22mm The first costs £11.80 http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/121504852123?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT The second £5.88 http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/391206888063?_trksid=p2055119.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT The first looks better built and seems to match the hole, whilst the second looks cheaply made and may need more work to keep in place. If I go ahead, there will be an update. I bought the more expensive USB/AUX dashboard extension cable because it looked a better fit, and I was correct. The socket without the cable attached. The blank socket I chose was close to the steering wheel A notch had to be cut out on upper right side of the hole, using a craft knife. A slight adjustment was done on another notch and the socket now fits perfectly. The dashboard material is soft and easy to work on. After routing the cable, repositioning the adapter to the space behind the heater on the passenger side freed up the glove box. If the adapter needs resetting, removing the glove box gives quick access. The USB/AUX socket in position. It looks a lot better now, but I may move it to the storage compartment between the seat replacing the original socket . This will need a lot more work and I could not remove the reverse collar on the gear stick. I don't want to break that! The system works well and I will not be using the microSD socket on the adapter, only USB memory sticks. The adapter can only use one or the other, so it is not an issue. The total integration is very good and the only minor gripe which is for every USB adapter, is the lack of artist/title display. I don't really look at what artist is playing, since I put the music on the USB stick! Unfortunately iPhone and iPod are not supported through the USB cable, but I don't own or use Apple products. A cheap upgrade. I have changed the position of the USB/AUX dashboard extension, to the centre storage box. This replaces the AUX only socket which is not needed. As you can see, both sockets look identical and the fitting notches are in the same location. The later Avensis has the USB/AUX in the same position in the centre storage box . Removing the centre console covers is fair simple. First the covers between the dashboard and the console and the console surround trim . Remove the lower console trim in the footwell on both sides. Then the gear lever console trim. Press on the gear lever cover surround to separate it from the trim and using a suitable lever lift the trim. . Also remove the ashtray and lighter panel to re-route the adapter cable. Now with the access you can unplug the AUX socket and remove it Install the AUX/USB socket and route the wire from the adapter carefully to the socket. Refit all panels in reverse order. Job done.
  4. 4 points
    How to install an aftermarket radio/cd/mp3 player in your T25 Avensis - I joined up here and found there wasn't a guide, so I had a go and took some pictures and tried to write one. Hope it's of use! Right. First of all you need a 10m socket, with a long handle so you can unscrew the bolts that hold the radio and air-con unit (which are also stuck together - more on that later). You also need an ISO adapter to suit the Toyota radio plugs (such as: this) and a bit of plastic to fill the gap left around the radio (such as: this) or you can buy them both together. But yeah, basically go on ebay and get an ISO harness adapter and a fascia adapter! FIRST, REMOVE ANY CD YOU HAVE IN THE MACHINE! REMEMBERING THIS ONCE THE RADIO IS ON YOUR KITCHEN TABLE CAUSES CONFUSION AND DELAY. Once you have all the things, first take off the gearknob and surround. The knob unscrews (eventually) and once that's off, I find if you hold the surround by poking your fingers down where the gaiter is and pulling the whole surround upwards using the gaiter as protection it avoids trying to pry it up around the edges. Once you've eased it away, you need to unplug the electrical connector for the cig lighter, which has a little clip, so don't just yank it. Untitled by Tony Lloyd, on Flickr Once that's done, stick the gearknob back on, just so you don't accidentally duff the radio/aircon unit up on the big pointy metal stick should you drop it or something. Next, you want to remove the top trim where the cup holder is. Easiest to open the glovebox, and just pry it away with your fingers. i found it came away pretty easily, but you need to unplug the electrical connector for the heated window, etc. As with the cig lighter there's a clip on the bottom of the plug. Untitled by Tony Lloyd, on Flickr The Radio and Aircon are clipped together as one unit with a big metal frame. the frame is bolted tot he dashboard by 4 brass (or brass coloured) bolts. Two at the top, and two at the bottom. They should be fairly obvious. The top two are a bit tricky to get at, try not to let them fall down behind the dash when you take them out! (You can see the top left one here) Untitled by Tony Lloyd, on Flickr Once you've unscrewed those, ease the radio & aircon block out, and unclip the many electrical plugs from the back. There's 2 for the air-con (IIRC) and three for the CD player if you have stering controls. Obviously some specs will differ slightly, but broadly speaking, the plugs will only fit in the holes they're meant for, so it shoudln't be too bad mating them up again! Once they're all unplugged, your dashboard should looks something like: Untitled by Tony Lloyd, on Flickr And you should have something like this left over: Untitled by Tony Lloyd, on Flickr Unscrew all those bolts/screws on both sides. Once you have the metal side plates off, to separate the air con and stereo units, you slide them sideways from each other. I had to break one of the clips to work this out, but if you just slide the radio to the left (I think) as you look at them, they will slot apart like magic! You can then attach the plastic fascia plate (this one) the same way. Modern radios usually have holes strategically placed in the side of the radio chassis to accept screws/bolts like the above. Mine did, although it didn't like the gold-coloured bolts which were holding the Toyota radio in, so I had to dig our some others. MAKE SURE WHATEVER SCREWS YOU USE AREN'T TOO LONG! (See your radio documentation to be sure, although it's usually embossed on the side or top of your radio saying "WOAH, ONLY 8MM SCREWS, YEAH?" or similar.) Anyway, screw it all together like a meccano thing, with your radio hovering there in mid air (for now), then add the fascia surround, and you might end up with something like this: Untitled by Tony Lloyd, on Flickr Now, the rest should be easy. Take care handling the unit, especially as the plastic fascia adapter is probably flimsy and brittle. Offer it up to where the old one was, and plug the connector adapter onto the toyota wires, then the back of your radio. Don't forget to re-connect the air con too. Then once it's located (you might have to ease the fascia bit into the gap as they're not typically made to the most exacting quality standards), then add the bolts. (It's worth checking everything works before you bolt it all up and put the gear surround and cupholder bits back!). Untitled by Tony Lloyd, on Flickr Basically from here, re-fitting is the reverse of removal! Just carefully ease the gear surround back on (you'll need the knob off again first, then on again after!) and re-fit the top trim (again, starting at the glove-box end) and reconnecting the plug for the heated rear window as you go. Ta-da! Untitled by Tony Lloyd, on Flickr EDIT: I should have mentioned, your steering wheel controls won't work unless you buy an extra harness adapter, which I haven't done. They do seem to be readily available though, here's some.
  5. 3 points
    Difficulty - Medium Time - About an hour Tools - A 24mm or 15/16AF spanner or socket, a 10mm hex socket or allen key for the transfer box and rear diff', a suitable draining container, a supply of rags and either an oil pump or at least one half litre oil bottle with a filler nozzle as shown in the photos. Frequency - Every 20,000 miles or 2 years (every second service). To get about under my car I put the front on the ramps and the rear onto some wooden blocks. Do not use brick or concrete blocks as they can crumble without warning. It is not necessary to have the vehicle level (fill the unit to the level plug) if you measure the oil in and I find the best way is with those half litre bottles which have a scale on the side. The transfer box and the rear axle take 0.9 litres of oil. Don't beat yourself up about measuring this accurately as 0.1 of a litre is about a table spoon full. Try to get 2 half litre bottles in each one. You will find that it is easier to squeeze the oil out of a part full bottle than a nearly empty one so I order 2.5 litres and keep transfering fresh oil into a container noting how much is going in. It will make sense once you start! In these pictures you will see the use of an oil pump but half litre bottles are just as good. It is often cheaper to buy oil in 5 litre drums so be sure to check the prices first. I have saved some old half litre bottles and decant the oil into them for measuring and filling. Starting with the gearbox; So 3.4 litres of API GL5 75W/90 You can remove the filler plug first to let the air in; Then drain the oil into a suitable container; Clean all the plugs carefully. Keep them to the same place they came from as some are magnetic to attract the debris.; Here is that pump I was on about! Only the !Removed! go to so much trouble!!!; To do the transfer box approach the drain plug from the front and to get at the filler - under the drivers door; 0.9 litres of Hypoid API GL5 SAE 90 (very important to use this extreme pressure [EP] oil) goes back in; This is a better view of the filler; Now around to the back and drain the diff'. You need a 10mm allen key; Add some more of the same oil as the transfer box - 0.9 litres;
  6. 3 points
    Thought I'd share my experience of installing a Cruise Control on a RAV with you lot, in case someone finds it useful or entertaining. Disclaimer : I am not an automotive engineer. Everything you read below is an account of my personal experiences and should not be treated as “a recipe” to do anything. If you are not entirely sure that you are safe in whatever you’re doing, you should simply not do it. No responsibility is given or implied for any of your own actions or any damage that may result from them. That out of the way :) ... I was doing some reading on the forum and on the net and I came to the conclusion that Cruise Control on a RAV4 is all done in software; And, more importantly, allready built-in! [Well, in my one anyway (‘07 XTR D4D 2.2)]. What was missing was a little control stalk that is mounted on the steering wheel. Someone then gave me a pointer to an auction on a well-known auction site where I found the very device for a princely sum of about 25 pounds. It was shipped from Thailand and arrived about a week later. Following is the procedure I used: First, I disconnected the battery [i thought that this is very important!] In order to get to the areas I needed to get to, I needed to lift the driver’s airbag (it is a part of the steering wheel cover assembly (horn)). Airbags should always be treated with respect. My thinking was that if there is no power to trigger them they should be reasonably safe. Lift Airbag assembly out of the way I undid the two Torx screws at the underside of the steering wheel using a ratchet and and an extension bar. (There are only two holes on the cowling, they are hard to miss). I then carefully lifted the airbag. I chose not to disconnect the airbag (to avoid upsetting anything) but “secured” it on top of the cowling with a couple of rubber bands. Note: The connectior that is circled in red is the one that CC stalk connects to Cut a hole for the CC-stalk I got a rough idea of the hole that I needed to make from another forum user’s photo of a factory fitted Cruise Control (thanks DavRav). I marked it with a felt-tip and got to work with a scalpel (I could have used a “box-cutter” / “Stanley” knife too). I used a small file and a tiny blowtorch to tidy up the edges. Install control stalk I slid the stalk through the hole I made and fastened it to the frame with a couple of screws. I then connected the stalk to [the only connector that would fit] on the steering wheel. Re-install airbag assembly I finally [very carefully] put things back where they were in the first place and re-did the two retaining torx-screws. Re-connect battery I found that step quite useful... as I was planning to start the car n'that... :) Test I [carefully] tested on a deserted stretch of road. Push the button - "CRUISE" dashboard light came on in it's green splendour :) All cruise control functions worked fine.... Job's a good'un!
  7. 3 points
    The following advice is intended as a guide as to how to replace the fuel filter in a Toyota Rav 4, 4.3. Tools Required: Non-latex gloves (do not underestimate the mess diesel will make of your hands.. nasty stuff!) 10mm spanner or socket Old rags or kitchen roll Pipe grips Jam jar Removal With the bonnet open, locate the fuel filter at the back right of the engine bay, behind the air filter: Remove the air filter by unclipping the three clips round the side and prising open from the front. Unscrew the clamp with either a large cross head screw driver or a 10mm socket (red circle). Disconnect the plug (blue circle): And remove the air filter itself: You can remove the lower section of the air filter housing but I did not feel this was necessary. You'll notice there are four hoses connected to the fuel filter housing. Its very important you reconnect these later in the correct order.. Mine had been colour marked as you can see in the picture. the reality is you cannot connect them wrong as they are shaped and as such will sit in the right place when the new filter is fitted. To disconnect the hoses squeeze the clips with your fingers and slide them a few cm further up the hose away from the filter. This way they stay attached and you have no risk of losing them into the engine bay: Now slide the hose off the metal pipe. Have some kitchen roll or a rag ready as you will get some spillage out of some of the hoses. With the hoses disconnected unscrew the bolt holding the fuel filter to the bracket using a 10mm socket or spanner: Unhook the cable from the bracket by sliding it horizontally then dropping it down. If you can disconnect the cable now then go ahead. Otherwise disconnect once you have the filter partially out and the connector is above the support bar in the picture. Be careful with this as this is a water sensor that sits within the filter. You need to re-use this bit and is probably not cheap to replace: The filter unit is now free to be removed from the car. Remove the cut out in the plastic trim directly above the filter by gently (but firmly) pulling it upwards. Then slide the filter unit up off the bracket and out: This is where i run out of photos as my hands were covered in diesel whilst changing the filter so taking pictures became impossible! Sorry! First thing to do is to drain the filter. On the bottom you will see a drain plug. unscrew this until the diesel starts to flow. Pour this into a jam jar or similar. Before it empties, close the valve again and shake the whole filter. this should free up some of the dirt so when you poor the rest of the diesel into the jar you should see a lot of the crud that was stuck in there... (Only if you're interested!): This was my jam jar: Once the diesel is drained you need to unscrew the plastic sensor. If you cannot do this by hand use pipe grips or similar but be careful not to squeeze too hard. You do not want to damage the sensor. Once off you need to unscrew the filter itself. Again if necessary use pipe grips to slacken the filter and unscrew. Installation: Now do everything in reverse order with the new filter but considering the following points: Never reuse the o-rings you've taken off the filter. there will be a new one in the box. Use it. Install the filter first. wet the o-rings with a touch of diesel or engine oil before tightening. Once tightened, do not slacken as you may not get the same good seal due to the o-ring reshaping. Tighten the filter by hand until it makes contact then tighten another 3/4 turn (still by hand). I used pipe grips just to ensure the seal was there as i struggled to get the 3/4 turn by hand. Fit the sensor again tightening by hand until firm. I gave it a tweak with the pipe grips because my hands were covered in diesel so could't ensure it was tight. DO NOT OVER-TIGHTEN. You are screwing plastic into metal. Over-tightening risk stripping the plastic threads. If you do this you will need a new sensor. Once reassembled, fit back into the car in the opposite order to removal. i.e.: Connect sensor cabling (Note when re-seating the connector to the bracket it pushes up from below opposed to sliding in as per removal) Place filter onto bracket and screw into place using 10mm bold Connect all hoses except the one with the arrow pointing away from the filter: You are now ready to prime the system... With the hose still off and a rag over the end of the metal pipe, pump the black plunger: Pumping could take a couple of minutes so keep at it. The plunger will begin to go hard and the fuel will begin to flow out the open pipe. Stop pumping and reconnect the hose. Pump a little more to continue to push the diesel through. The plunger will become quite firm. Remember to refit your air filter and the plastic trim directly above the filter before attempting to start the car! Start the car. It may turn over a few times before taking. Once it starts it may sound rough as the air gets pushed out the system. Once it's idling happily rev it a bit and make sure all is running well. Step back and admire your handiwork!! ------ Any inaccuracies or recommendations let me know and i'll fix it. Webblers
  8. 3 points
    Various methods: "Programming New Keys" STEPS: 1. Begin by sitting in the driver seat with all the doors shut. 2. Insert your working master (black) key in the ignition. 3. Very Quickly, turn the key from "LOCK" to "ON" 5 times. (You will end with the key in the "LOCK" position) [the 5 on-offs just need to be < 1 second each (you can hear something switching in the engine bay after 1 second switched to on - you've probably just got to beat that).] 4. Immediately, open and close the driver door 6 times very quickly. (End with the door closed) 5. Immediately, remove your working Master Key and insert your new Master Key 6. Turn the key to the "ON" position and leave it there while you wait for 1 minute. 7. After the minute, if you want to program another key, just remove the first one and insert the next one, turning it to "ON" and leaving it in position for 1 minute. 8. When you are through programming keys, just take the last one out, open and then close the driver door to lock in the programming, and your done. Programming Sub Keys (Grey) is done the same way except you turn the master key 4 times before you open and close the door 5 times. Then insert the sub key, turn to the "ON" position, and wait your minute. Finish by removing the key and opening and closing the door 1 time as before. Linking your Key to car locks: Better to start with confirmation mode first to know that how many keys are already programmed to it. Here's the info (I have only tried and tested the "ADD" function) : There are four different programming commands when setting up or verifying your remote transmitter, they are: A. Add mode, used to add a remote to your Prius that is not currently registered. B. Rewrite mode, used to erase all previously registered remotes and allow you to begin again the programming process. C. Confirmation mode, used to verify the number of remotes that are already programmed in your Prius. D. Prohibit mode, to prohibit all remotes from operating the door locks. All four modes start with these instructions: 1) Make sure that the key is not in the ignition, the doors are unlocked, and the driver's door is open. 2) Very quickly, without turning, insert and remove key from the ignition twice. (leave key out) 3) Close and open the driver door twice. (leave door in open position) 4) Again, insert key into the ignition and remove it. This time only once. (leave key out) 5) Close and open the driver door twice, then close the door. 6) Insert key into the ignition and leave it in the LOCK position. A. Add mode: A1) Turn the key to "ON" for 1 second, then turn back to "LOCK". A2) Remove the key. A3) Youll hear the doors "LOCK" and 1 second later "UNLOCK" (just listen) A4) On your remote, press the lock and unlock buttons simultaneously for 1 to 1½ seconds, then let go. A5) On your remote, IMMEDIATELY press unlock by itself. A6) Youll get one of three responses: R1) Youll hear the doors "LOCK", then "UNLOCK" once. The remote is accepted. If you want to program another remote, immediately proceed to step A4 with your second remote, otherwise open the drivers door and the remote is registered. R2) Youll hear the doors "LOCK", then "UNLOCK" twice. Either you didnt use the same remote in steps A4 and A5(not likely), or this remote was already registered. The timing was off when you pressed the LOCK and UNLOCK buttons simultaneously and then UNLOCK by itself. Immediately press the two buttons together and the unlock by itself again. Keep trying until you get the locks to signal once that you have been successful. Then if you have another remote to program, quickly press its' buttons as before, until you hear the locks signal once. When you are finished, open and close the driver door to lock in the programming. R3) If no response, go back to step 1 near the beginning of these instructions. B. Rewrite mode: B1) Turn the key to "ON" for 1 second, turn back to "LOCK" for 1 second, then back to "ON" for 1 second, and finally back to "LOCK" for 1 second B2) Remove the key. B3) Youll hear the doors "LOCK", 1 second later "UNLOCK", 1 sec., "LOCK", 1 sec. "UNLOCK". (just listen) B4) On your remote, press the lock and unlock buttons simultaneously for 1 to 1½ seconds, then let go. B5) On your remote, IMMEDIATELY press unlock by itself. B6) Youll get one of three responses: R1) Youll hear the doors "LOCK", then "UNLOCK" once. The remote is accepted. If you want to program another remote, immediately proceed to step B4, otherwise open the drivers door and the remote is registered. R2) Youll hear the doors "LOCK", then "UNLOCK" twice. You didnt use the same remote in steps B4 and B5(not likely). R3) If no response, go back to step 1 near the beginning of these instructions. C. Confirmation mode: C1) Turn the key in 1 to "ON" and back to "LOCK" in one second intervals for a total of 3 times. C2) Remove the key. C3) Youll hear the doors "LOCK" and "UNLOCK" in 2 second intervals. (just listen and count each set) 1 Set = You have 1 remote registered 2 Sets = You have 2 remotes registered 3 Sets = You have 3 remotes registered 4 Sets = You have 4 remotes registered 5 Sets = You do NOT have any remotes registered D. Prohibit mode: D1) Turn the key to "ON" and back to "LOCK" in one second intervals a total of 5 times. D2) Remove the key. D3) Youll hear the doors "LOCK", 1 second later "UNLOCK" 5 times. (just listen and count each set) D4) This will erase all previously registered remotes and cancel the wireless door lock function.
  9. 2 points
    How to replace a Toyota Avensis (T27) Radio/CD player W53828 with a Toyota navigation unit B9012 First disconnect the vehicle battery. There is a 20 pin connector plugged into the back of Radio/CD W53828 with the following pin out: 1. Empty 2. Empty 3. Yellow 4. Empty 5. Empty 6. Purple 7. Pink 8. Light Blue 9. Empty 10. Empty 11. White & Black 12. Empty 13. Empty 14. Empty 15. Red 16. White 17. Black 18. Orange 19. Dark Blue 20. Empty Next there is an 8 pin connector plugged into the back of Radio/CD W53828 with the following pin out: (this connector will not plug into the back of the Toyota Navigation unit B9012) 1. Blue 2. White 3. Black 4. Empty 5. Red 6. Purple 7. Empty 8. Empty The other connections are the same in both units. If you only have the Toyota Navigation unit B9012 without any of the connectors you will have to buy a speed signal cable (€10 approx.) that fits into the grey connector on the B9012, part No. PZ445-00333-04 and a GPS antenna (€25 approx.), part No. PZ445-00333-05. The GPS antenna will fit directly into the back of the B9012. If you bought the speed signal cable from a Toyota Dealer it will have 3 wires (Red, Purple & White, and Green). If you got it from a donor car it will have 2 wires (Red wire and a Yellow wire). Cut the Yellow wire that goes to pin 3 of the 20 pin connector. Connect the end that is coming from the vehicle wiring harness to the purple & white cable of the speed signal cable you purchased (or the yellow wire if you got it from a donor car). The yellow wire that is still attached to the 20 pin connector must be connected to the blue wire that is in pin 1 of the 8 pin connector. Then make the following connections: Move the white wire in pin 2 of the 8 pin connector to pin 4 of the 20 pin connector. Move the black wire in pin 3 of the 8 pin connector to pin 5 of the 20 pin connector. Move the red wire in pin 5 of the 8 pin connector to pin 13 of the 20 pin connector. Move the purple wire in pin 6 of the 8 pin connector to pin 14 of the 20 pin connector. You should now have all the Bluetooth and navigation functionality on the B9012 unit and in the proper place on the steering wheel controls. Now the Rear View or Reverse camera. If you got a rear view camera the connector for it is already inside the panel in the boot lid. However this cable only goes up as far as a grey block connector inside the left hand kick panel beside your left leg in the foot well of the passenger seat (in the case of a RHD). The connector in the boot lid will have 4 wires inside a black outer casing - White, Red, Black, and Blue. The insulation on the blue wire may only extend up the cable a few centimetres. At the other end inside the kick panel it may have orange or green insulation. This wire needs to be extended from here up to the back of the Toyota navigation unit B9012. At the back of the Toyota navigation unit B9012 make the following connections: Red wire to pin 1 of the 20 pin connector. Black wire to pin 2 of the 20 pin connector. White wire to pin 11 of the 20 pin connector (there is already a white & black wire in this position, remove it and insulate the end of it). Blue (Orange or Green) to pin 12 of the 20 pin connector. Now extend the red wire from the speed signal cable connector down to the back of the glove box. Behind the glove box there is a panel with various block connectors, relays, fuses etc. On this panel three of the block connectors are held in with black clips over the block connectors. The middle one of these block connectors has a red wire near the bottom. This is the reverse signal cable. Connect the red wire from the speed signal cable to this wire. Your reverse camera should now work.
  10. 2 points
    Hi, This is my first guide so please if something seems unclear message me and i will try to explain better. Sorry for the quality of the pics my camera died and had to use my phone. 1st you need to remove the 4 screws and take the back plate off of the camera. 2nd cut the back plate to remove the wire. This is what it will look like when done. 3rd cut the plastic strip off your licence plate lamp. Then cut the bulb holder off. I forgot to take i pic when i did this. Push the leads through the newly cut licence plate bulb holder. Then align the bulb holder with the camera and make small holes in line with the screw holes in the back of the camera and screw them together. Then fit the seal back to the light. Then i soldered the lamp wires in the camera for the licence plate light to the cut off lamp holder so it can just be clipped together in the car.(easier to remove if you need to)(dont forget to tape the end up as to help secure the wire and stop any problems with it shorting out on the body) Make sure you get the correct polarity for the led or it wont light up. Then fit it to the car. Then check it works.( the camera i recieved the leads for the camera power was coloured wrong i had to rewire them red to negative and black to the possitive.) i thought the camera was broken. My head unit is the pioneer AVH-2400BT. I hope this is of some use to someone on here and thanks for reading.
  11. 2 points
    Devon Aygo has recently supplied the following information on oil requirements: "The issues over which oils are used is caused by a European law called "Block exemption" the same law that states that manufacturers can't insist on main dealer servicing, also stops Toyota from insisting what oils are used by anyone wishing to service a car including their own dealer network. All Toyota are allowed to do is list a set of specifications that the oil used must meet they can also list a "preferred" oil. For example I have listed below the requirements Toyota have for the mkiii Prius, a car that has caused a lot of posts over the oils that have been used during servicing. This info is taken from Toyota's Service data sheet for European Prius mkiii only! Preferred option: 0w20 Other listed options: 5w20 5w30 10w30 15w40 20w50 These grades above are listed by Toyota as they meet the following required specifications: API grade SL or SM multigrade engine oil API grade SL “Energy-Conserving”. SM “Energy-Conserving” or ILSAC* multigrade engine oil. Toyota can only require the oils used meet the minimum specifications above. So long a the oil used meets the above the oil grade is not enforceable. At present Toyota have "asked" but cannot enforce the dealer network to use the following, New Models introduced in 2019 such as Corolla Hybrid, Rav4 & Facelift Prius use 0w16 2019 Corolla 1.2T 0w20 2019 Supra 0w20 ( there is a Supra Specific grade for this ) Mk3 Prius, Prius plug-in, Prius +, Mk1 Auris HSD, Mk2 Auris HSD & Yaris HSD 0w20 Mk1 & Mk2 Prius 5w30 Optimal drive petrol models 0w20 Other petrol engines 5w30 Diesel engines incl Optimal drive 5w30 Diesel engines with DPF/DPNR including optimal drive 0w30 or 5w30 meeting C2 low ash New additions 1.6 1WW & 2.0 2WW ( BMW ) 5w30 meeting C3 low Ash 1.6 DV6 & 2.0 DW10 ( PSA ) 5w30 meeting C2 low ash
  12. 2 points
    A question has been asked how to remove the wing mirror cover to indicator unit, on the Avensis T27 from 2009 to 2015. Flat bladed tools are required like trim removal tools, but screw drivers will do. Starting from the top side, carefully insert the tool between the cover and black border, then gently lever away. Work around the the cover with another tool I fold the mirror to work to tool down. Then firmly pull the top of the cover away and down. The cover will come away. Looking at the inside of the cover, you can see why cover needs to be separated from the top - These clip/tags are not accessible. The tools I used to remove the cover. Now looking at the uncovered wing mirror, the indicator is more accessible. I did not go further and remove the indicator, since it was fine. Also looking into the mirror itself Notice the connections for the heated element. Replacing the cover, make sure the black border is between the inner and outer lips of the cover, then push it firmly back in place. Hopefully this will help those unfortunate to need to replace the indicator or glass. Konrad
  13. 2 points
    Part 2 Discs On this car I changed the discs. In this case, remove the upper caliper bolt; remove the caliper and hang it off the spring. Do not allow it to hang on the brake pipe; Then undo the retaining bolts and remove the carrier; If you intend using the disc again you should use 2 - 8mm bolts in the extraction holes as shown on this rear disc; Wind the bolts in until they apply pressure then gently tap the disc from behind. If you don't have a hide or rubber mallet use a piece of wood against the disc and then hit that with the lump hammer. In this case they were scrap so a swift smack with a lump hanner from the back side will knock them off. Clean the disc with white spirit; ......and the hub mating face with a wire brush; Then degreaser to get the hub as clean as you can you can; Clean the carrier; Then put the disc on the hub and refit the carrier - 98Nm (72ft/lbs) The discs are not fixed, they are trapped between the wheel and the hub. If you have problems with them trying to fall off use a couple of wheel nuts backwards to hold them in position while you work (rear disc shown); Now reassemble the caliper and pads as shown in part 1.
  14. 2 points
    Difficulty - Medium Time - about 40 minutes per side. Tools required - After lifting and securing the vehicle you need a 14mm and 17mm spanner, large screwdriver, g clamp, Coppaslip or similar copper based grease. The very best standard road going pads (and more than a match for most web available "performance" pads) are genuine Toyota which are available at a discounted price from Lindop Bros. Pm Parts_King for details. Introduction The front caliper is of the reaction type and is very simple to work on. When the brake is pressed, the piston pushes the inner pad into contact with the disc. When the inner pad has contacted the disc an equal and opposite force pushes the caliper (which is free to slide on guide pins) backwards and this in turn is connected to the outer pad via the caliper bridge. The outer pad is then brought into contact with the disc under equal pressure and the brake is applied. There are no return springs to release the brake. Only deformation of the piston seals and the action of the disc clearing the pads allows the brake to release. In a similar way there is no adjustment of the brake as the wear is compensated for by the piston travel and the caliper sliding on the guide pins. As the pads wear, fluid is displaced from the master cylinder reservoir and there is enough capacity of fluid to cater for fully worn front and rear pads. When new pads are fitted, the fluid is pushed back into the reservoir and for this reason the fluid should not be topped up between brake pad changes unless the fluid drops below the "MIN" mark or the warning light indicates that a leak has occurred and this case the fault should be investigated immediately. The only time the fluid should be topped up is at the two year service interval when it should be changed. Specifications Minimum pad thickness - 1.0mm Minimum disc thickness - 23mm Note; There will almost always be a lip of rust around the outer diameter of the disc and the greatest wear will always be on the wear path around 15mm from the outer edge of the disc. This is because there is a higher rotational speed at the outside diameter and also there is some "off brake" contact as the hub bearing allows some swaying movement of the disc when cornering. Brake Fluid - SAE J1703 DOT3 Note; TGB are currently supplying DOT 5.1 which can be mixed. Procedure You are responsible for making sure the car is safe. For best results use a trolley jack and axle stands. If you do use the supplied jack, remember that it is only a very temporary device for changing a wheel and under no circumstances should you risk putting any part of your body under the vehicle. You can make things a little easier by turning the lock as I have done in these photos. The steering should only be turned when the vehicle is on an axle stand and turning the wheel while using the supplied jack will possibly result in the vehicle falling to the ground - don't risk it! To change only the pads, undo the bottom retaining bolt with a 14mm spanner. If the back nut turns just use a 17mm spanner to hold it; Use a screwdriver to prize the caliper outwards; .......and swivel it upwards; If you are only changing the pads use the g clamp at this stage to carefully push the piston back into the caliper; If somebody has topped up the brake fluid it will be pushed out of the top of the reservoir. Either syphon some fluid out, collect as much as you can with rags or undo the bleed nipple on the caliper and allow the fluid to be displaced. If you do the latter, follow the instructions for bleeding the brake. Easiest way for future reference is do not top up between fluid changes as indicated above! Note the position of the pads and shims. They are a slightly different shape to each other and the kit comes with 2 pairs of different shaped pads. If you get them mixed up, look at the back of the old pads and you will see the shape of the piston on the inner pad - they can't really go in wrong. Use the screwdriver to ease them out of the carrier. Clean the shims and place them onto the new pads with the arrows pointing in the direction of rotation. You can apply a thin film of coppaslip between each of the contact areas as this will act as a squeal dampener. Just to clarify, the owner supplied these pads and I would always recommend the genuine Toyota ones. There is no need to apply anything to the genuine Toyota pads as they will be silent in operation; Clean the stainless steel locating carriers. These easily come out but to avoid being confused about where they go, keep them to their relative locations, if necessary doing them one at a time. This is a first class idea which allows the pads to slide on a low friction stainless steel abutment rather than directly in the cast iron carrier which often corrodes and can cause the pads to stick and wear unevenly. Clean them as best you can - a bit of wire wool works grand; If you are only doing the pads, place them into the caliper. One has a bent piece of metal which acts as a wear indicator by squealing when wear allows the pad to contact the disc; This goes at the inside and at the top; Here is an exploded view of the whole assembly; Drop the caliper back down, pushing the guide pins back to allow alignment and fit the bottom bolt - 26Nm (20ft/lbs). Important; press the brake pedal until it goes hard as this pushes the piston/pads out to the disc. Don't wait until you move the car as when the pedal goes to the floor you will panic and make a mess of the seat! If you do forget - don't forget you have a hand brake!!! Refit the wheel and lower the car - wheel nut torque - 103 Nm (76 ft/lbs) See part 2 to change the discs.
  15. 2 points
    The symptoms. The MPG is disgraceful this time last year we was averaging no less than 38mpg over a tank and around 42-45mpg when driven on a run with cruise control set at 70mph. Over Christmas we did approx 1500miles and have managed best on a run +4oc 31mpg driving with cruise control set at 70mph, when it was cold we was down to 21mpg and have now risen to around 30mpg driving like your gran going to church. These figures are a long way short of the figures that Toyota quote and of what we was achieving this time last year with similar temperatures, it may be worth noting the car makes a pinking sound at around 1800-2300rpm if you put your foot down and there is a small delay / flat spot in throttle response (not turbo lag) when you press the accelerator, I suspect this is the fly by wire throttle system but is it supposed to have a delay? How to clean, I did have to borrow a few pictures as I had cleaned mine by the time I made this thread. 1. Remove the engine cover, this just pulls up and unclips. 2. Now you can see the EGR Valve, you will need a 12mm socket, Ratchet and extension to remove this. 3. Remove these 2 x bolts 1st for the pipe above the EGR valve. 4. Now undo the other 4 x 12mm nuts and bolts from the EGR valve and unplug this from the wiring loom, this can now be removed. 5. This is now what you will find. Dirty manifold with 2 x blocked breathing holes. Dirty EGR valve with restricted air flow. 6. I cleaned these using an old toothbrush, small screw driver, carburettor cleaner, old cloth and a dyson cleaner to suck the muck out. Try to scrape and brush out the thick carbon then use the carburettor cleaner to clean the finish this off. Now once all this is cleaned out just simply refit, This took me a total of 15 minutes so I assure you this is very easy. The results This will vary for everyone but in my experience I did a 360mile round trip the next day with mainly cruise control set at 70mph, going there (more downhill) the roads where very very wet with poor visibility and approx 7oc and we averaged 41.1MPG by the time we got there. When we come home with mainly cruise control set at 70mph, slightly uphill most of the way the roads where dry and approx 3oc the average MPG had dropped to 40.0. When I filled up we got 37.4litres in the tank which I rounded up to 38 and worked out at 43MPG (I always brim the tank). This is now showing a big improvement / approx 20% for a 15minute job of cleaning the EGR valve. I will also note the slight flat spots in throttle response are a lot less than before. I would like to say a big thank you to cabcurtains for bringing the EGR valve to my attention and to twingo69 as I borrowed a few pictures from his thread to make this guide. UPDATE Ok it has been nearly 5 months and around 4k since I did this do this morning I thought I would check the EGR valve. To be honest the manifold was very very clean maybe a small less than 1mm coating of carbon and the EGR valve had a little more, I did clean this again while it was removed but in my opinion looking at what I seen today I would recommend cleaning this around every 12months or 10k. UPDATE Well over the next 12 months the MPG just continued to drop, Toyota claimed there was no problems with the car but by Feb 11 we could only manage 28-32MPG at best. I had also noticed the car had started to do a lot of DPF recycle burns and suspect the DPF was maybe on its way out, we had no warrenty left on the car so had a shop around and exchanged for a 5 month old 500 mile CRZ. What can I say but for sure the CRZ is one of the best cars we ever owned and was fantastic on fuel (49MPG average for every turn of the key over 9 months and 9000 miles) but due to the birth of Lewis we needed a bigger car so exchanged this for a CTR (FN2), I will say that so far over 7000 miles this has returned 29MPG for us which puts a quicker petrol car in the same area as the T180 when we traded this in. What never made sence was when we first bought the T180 we could get 40-44MPG no problem then at around 30'000 miles the MPG just started to drop while nothing really changed, we never found a cure for this or a fault but for sure this is problem and Toyota must know about this because they dropped the 2.2 and 2.0 Auris diesel cars and have now agreed to use BMW diesel engines from 2013. Why the worlds largest car manufacturer would need to use a BMW diesel engine is beyond me unless it shows they are struggling to get a modern diesel to be clean and efficient while being very driveable.
  16. 2 points
    Devon Aygo has recently supplied the following information on oil requirements: "The issues over which oils are used is caused by a European law called "Block exemption" the same law that states that manufacturers can't insist on main dealer servicing, also stops Toyota from insisting what oils are used by anyone wishing to service a car including their own dealer network. All Toyota are allowed to do is list a set of specifications that the oil used must meet they can also list a "preferred" oil. For example I have listed below the requirements Toyota have for the mkiii Prius, a car that has caused a lot of posts over the oils that have been used during servicing. This info is taken from Toyota's Service data sheet for European Prius mkiii only! Preferred option: 0w20 Other listed options: 5w20 5w30 10w30 15w40 20w50 These grades above are listed by Toyota as they meet the following required specifications: API grade SL or SM multigrade engine oil API grade SL “Energy-Conserving”. SM “Energy-Conserving” or ILSAC* multigrade engine oil. Toyota can only require the oils used meet the minimum specifications above. So long a the oil used meets the above the oil grade is not enforceable. At present Toyota have "asked" but cannot enforce the dealer network to use the following, New Models introduced in 2019 such as Corolla Hybrid, Rav4 & Facelift Prius use 0w16 2019 Corolla 1.2T 0w20 2019 Supra 0w20 ( there is a Supra Specific grade for this ) Mk3 Prius, Prius plug-in, Prius +, Mk1 Auris HSD, Mk2 Auris HSD & Yaris HSD 0w20 Mk1 & Mk2 Prius 5w30 Optimal drive petrol models 0w20 Other petrol engines 5w30 Diesel engines incl Optimal drive 5w30 Diesel engines with DPF/DPNR including optimal drive 0w30 or 5w30 meeting C2 low ash New additions 1.6 1WW & 2.0 2WW ( BMW ) 5w30 meeting C3 low Ash 1.6 DV6 & 2.0 DW10 ( PSA ) 5w30 meeting C2 low ash
  17. 2 points
    When i was looking for a Guide for adjusting the handbrake there wasnt one,so i just thought id knock a quick one up and hope that it may help someone else. I fitted new brake discs and the handbrake was adjusted fully at the bottom nut,so make sure this is done first really. The first step is to remove the chrome frame around the gear stick gaiter..see pic Just a slight pull from the rear lifting it up is suffice. Next step after the chrome frame is removed is to lift the actual gaiter upwards as far as it will go to aid access. We now need to remove the trim that will allow access to the handbrake adjustment nuts. The trim may seem quite stubborn to remove but just grasp the rear of the trim at the back of the gear stick and lift at the same time as gently pulling backwards and ease it away from the gear stick,be a bit careful with this as the wires for the ashtray illumination are attached,i didn;t remove the wire connection i just laid it to one side on the passenger floor out of the way. This is the view once the trim has been removed. Next step is to remove the 2 screws which are highlighted with red arrows this to allow the centre console to be removed. After the 2 screws are removed you need to ease away the console which surrounds the handbrake lever its self,which again be gentle with it but use enough force to disengage the console away from the 2 lugs at the back,it does seem tight but it will snap away just dont go mad with it. Ease away the the trim indicated by the red arrows. Heres a view with the trim removed. The red arrow in this pic indicates the position of the handbrake adjustment screws. You will need a long 10mm socket like this to undo the lock nut first of all. You will also need a 10mm open ended spanner to hold the bottom nut whilst you undo the lock nut completely. Dont loose the lock nut like i nearly did.After you have undone the lock nut you can then adjust nut turning it clock wise to take up- the slack,keep trying your hand brake until you have 3 to 4 clicks ,i did mine to 3 clicks but bear in mind you dont want to over tighten the nut as the handbrake shoes are at risk of binding and you dont want tha After you are happy with the adjustment,re screw the lock nut back on Next step although not essential is to lubricate the mechanism so its nice and easy to operate, i also sprayed the button as well. Just reverse the operation to refit everything back Now my handbrake is perfect.
  18. 2 points
    One of my least favourite parts of the car cleaning process is washing! yep, that's right, I hate it, loathe it with a passion bordering on the psychotic. Why I hear you ask? OK, the wash process is when you risk causing most damage to any paint finish as there is constant friction between the washing tool and paint and any dirt on the surface can act as a scourer, leaving more damage, more swirls and more work ultimately. With this in mind, I figured that other people might be having the same issues so I've compiled a 'how to' guide. This is by no means a definitive (you can only wash your car this way) gospel, rather, it's a bunch of hints, tips and 'do's and 'don'ts' which may be helpful. Sun or Shade? Traditionally, washing your car in bright, hot sunshine (which we of course experience a lot of here in the UK…) was always a no-no and whilst there are some shampoos which can and do work reasonably well in sunny conditions, I always try to avoid this as water spots very quickly on paint and glass, shampoo dries streaky before you can rinse away, drying towels drag on water spots, causing scratching – plus the folically challenged always end up with a sunburnt head! Which shampoo? There are a lot of shampoos available both off the shelf, via the Internet or from specialist companies who supply the trade. I usually steer clear of "wash & wax" type products, as they rarely use a particularly good quality wax and I want pure cleaning power from my shampoo (now, THAT sounds like an advert for washing powder!) Expensive shampoo is something I usually avoid, not because I'm tight, but because they rarely out-perform lower priced products. I always look for shampoo that doesn't strip any wax from the car and ideally one which sheets water off the surface (more on this later) Sonax Extra Gloss and Mothers California Gold are particular favourites for this reason. Process I always evaluate any car I work on before doing anything to it. Look for any damage, corrosion, bird mess etching or other fallout and decide on the best route to removal. I then rinse the car with plain tap water from the hose. Spend a good few minutes doing this, as pre-rinsing will help remove any dust, loose dirt or mud from the car, reducing the risk of this causing damage to your paintwork. Mix your shampoo as directed – you can use either cold or lukewarm water, not hot as it can either strip wax or reduce its ability to protect, plus it'll burn your hands….. Get a second bucket and fill with cold water. Chuck out that sponge!!!!!!! Yellow sponges are, in my humble opinion, the single biggest cause of wash damage. They trap dirt on a flat surface and simply move it around the paint, making the dirt particles like a scouring pad on your pristine paintwork. Even regular rinsing can't overcome this problem, so what can you do? Easy, invest in a lambswool washmitt. Does exactly what it says on the tin, in that most have a synthetic mitt that you fit your hand into covered with a thick layer of genuine lambswool. Why stick your hand up half a dead sheep? Why not I say – whatever floats your boat…… Seriously, lambswool is softer than a synthetic sponge and draws dirt deep into the wool, and away from your paint. It also rinses cleaner and dirt is not trapped as easily, thus reducing the risk of damage. You can clean them in a mild liquid detergent and I have mitts, which are close to 2 years old and still work well. Chenille and microfibre mitts are also available, but in my experience lambswool performs considerably better. Back to the process….. Don't be a scrooge! You should now have the following tools. 1. Bucket filled with shampoo mixture 2. Bucket filled with cold water 3. Washmitt 4. Hosepipe This is the order in which I wash my Astra hatch. 1. Roof 2. Side windows 3. Bonnet 4. Sides to rubbing strip approx 1/3 from sill height 5. Rear window/boot 6. Front end 7. Windscreen I try to follow the logic that, under normal use, area 1 stays cleanest and area 7 collects the most dirt, bugs and so on. Put mitt in bucket, onto panel and soap thoroughly and here's where you don't need to be (and mustn't be) stingy with your shampoo mixture! use plenty as the soap is both cleaning and providing lubrication (no sniggering at the back please) between your mitt and the paintwork. You can always make up more if you run out! Try to work in straight lines to minimise swirling. I generally use the following rule; Horizontal panels (roof, bonnet, boot) – front-to-back-motions Vertical panels (doors, wings, front & rear) – top-to-bottom motions After each panel, dip the mitt in the clean water bucket, rinse and continue. I generally change the water every 3rd panel or more frequently if the car is very dirty. I tend to do the roof and side glass, then rinse, bonnet, rinse, side 1, rinse, side 2 rinse, tailgate, rinse, grill, rinse, windscreen, rinse. I then switch to another bucket, make up more soap solution and clean the sill panels, front and rear bumpers and rinse. You can use 2 or even 3 clean water buckets (I do this on my black 205), Grit Guards on your rinse bucket, different mitts for different areas – your choice really. Get your end off Finally, remove all couplings from the end of your hose then use the stream of water to get as much water from the car as possible – the less water left, the less drying needed. Drying Get a good microfibre waffle weave drying towel. These are heavier microfibre towels, with pockets that soak up water very quickly 'some won't' even wring out after drying 2 or more cars! I tend to use several towels on a rotation basis when I dry cars and blot water spots. I also use a lightweight waffle weave which absorbs less water but is lighter than most drying towels. Meguiars Water Magnet is the best drying towel I have used so far – absorbs a lot of water without becoming heavy. Always dry in straight lines – I dry front to back on all horizontal panels and top to bottom on all vertical panels. Don't forget doorshuts, petrol filler and boot/bonnet shuts (I have several older towels for these areas) You can also use some QD spray whilst drying – just make sure it's compatible with any wax on the car to avoid streaking. Conclusion This guide should help you to maintain the perfect finish and reduce paintwork damage during washing. You can add a lot of tools, products and other techniques into the wash process but I have tried to stick to the basics rather than confuse everyone. http://video.google.co.uk/videoplay?docid=...how+to+wash+car
  19. 1 point
    Edit... this post is to illustrate typical behaviour of the Auris bar graph fuel gauge and also gives some real world m.p.g figures. I filled up (brim full) 20 days OK and the car has been driven probably 70% or so of those days. Mixed road, urban, town centre and motorway. Climate control (air con) is permanently on. These are the "Fuel Bar" readings... Mileage start 0.00, all bars lit. Mileage 149. First bar goes off. Then comes back on. Then permanently off at 153 miles. Mileage 185. Second bar goes off. Then comes back on and finally permanently off at 190 miles. Mileage 247. Third bar goes off. Mileage 300. Fourth bar goes off. Mileage 339. Fifth bar goes off and then on again at 343 and then off at 346. Mieage 390. Sixth bar goes off and then on again, and then off at 393. Mileage 447. Seventh bar goes off and then on again at 450 and then off at 453. With two bars still lit and cruise range showing 60 miles I brim fill again. Fuel taken 42.32 litres (9.31 gallons). Total mileage covered, 458.6 M.P.G = 49.25 Theoretical range based on 55 litre tank, 596 miles.
  20. 1 point
    Difficulty - Easy Time - about 45 minutes. Frequency - 10,000 miles or 12 Months Tools required - 14mm socket and ratchet with extension bar. Filter wrench (examples shown below). Drain container. Jug or measure to re-fill oil. If you decide to remove the sump shield you will need the 10mm socket and a trim tool or screwdriver to pop out the fixing studs. A phillips screwdriver to remove the clips in the access flaps. A torque wrench if you have one. Parts - 5.9 litres of 5W/30 Semi Synthetic oil (I paid £12.97+VAT for 5 litres). I only use Morris's oil; http://www.morrislubricants.co.uk/ 1 oil filter - 04152-31060, later part No 01452-OR010 - £9.60 inc VAT (See Kingo for discounted price delivered to home address). This is the proper oil filter socket with cut outs to engage the lugs on the filter housing. Either Google or search ebay and type in "Lexus oil filter socket". Laser do a cheaper pressed steel version. Introduction The oil not only has the job of lubricating the many moving parts of the engine it also accounts for about 30% of the cooling and has many other functions. These include anti foaming agents and suspension additives that stop dirt from settling and detergents to keep the inside of the engine clean. The viscosity or "thickness" of the oil is determined by a viscosity index number. Thin oil starts at zero and the higher the number the thicker it gets. The oil for the 2.2 D4D is stated as 5W/30. This means that the oil is thin when cold (5W - winter viscosity) and 30 for summer or warm. The oil is able to change its viscosity with temperature as it is fortified with a structure that bulks up as the temperature rises and maintains its lubricating qualities through a wide temperature range. The oil is in an extremely hostile environment. Inside the engine it is subject to extremes of pressure and temperature. It becomes contaminated with carbon and fuel which escapes in small quantities past the pistons and as the engine cycles through temperature it produces significant amounts of condensation which is also suspended in the oil. Over time these contaminants create quite a corrosive cocktail and so must be renewed periodically to maintain engine life. Healthy oil will significantly improve the lifespan of seals, gaskets and timing chains in addition to major engine components. If there is one piece of advice that you will benefit from more than any other it is to change the oil at least as specified if not sooner. My RAV has done just less than 13k and is not 2 years old until September but because of the low mileage I have changed the oil 3 times in this period. Generally the lower the mileage the more water gets into the oil and frequent changes are adviseable. Those vehicles doing 10-12k per year or more are less vunerable and can comfortably be left the full year or 10k whichever comes first. The oil and filter change forms the basis of the intermediate service. Even if you have to buy some items to get set up you can then change your own oil and ask your Toyota Centre to do the rest of the service which will cost considerably less. In summary the oil is the life blood of the engine. If you neglect anything else you risk damage. If you neglect the oil you will definitely ruin the engine. Procedure The oil becomes extremely hot so be sure to change the oil when the engine is warm. Warm oil will also drain out of the engine more thoroughly. To help with the clarity of the photos I put the car onto ramps but it is possible to do it on a level surface or to aid the process slightly you can drive it onto sturdy blocks of wood. Do not use concrete blocks or bricks as they can crumble under the weight. It is possible to gain extra access by driving the drivers side wheel onto a convenient kirb. The onus on gaining more access safely is with you! If you have sensitive skin use barrier cream or disposable gloves and have a good supply of rags for any spillage. Accessing the sump plug and filter is done through 2 flaps in the sump shield. The left flap with the red arrow points to the filter and the right green arrow points to the sump plug. To undo the flaps unscrew the phillips screw carefully then pop out the stud with a trim tool or screw driver; You can see much better in this picture with the sump shield removed. Use the 14mm socket to remove the sump plug; and carefully position your container to catch the oil; While that is draining get ready to change the filter. The box comes with the new rubber O rings and also a drain adapter for draining the filter which would otherwise result in oil all over the place; Find a piece of hose or pipe to fit the adapter. Remove the plug in the filter case with the 14mm socket; then push the adapter and pipe into the filter which will lift a valve and drain the oil into your container; When the oil has drained remove the adapter which will automatically withdraw the old sealing ring> Use a socket or filter wrench to unscrew the filter housing; Remove the housing and filter and I worked in a tray on the bench. Drain and wipe out the filter housing with clean rags. Remove the old sealing ring and fit the new one. When you fit the new one do not roll it on but stretch carefully over the filter housing then work your way down to the groove. A twisted seal may leak oil; Lightly oil the new ring with clean engine oil. Clean out the housing on the engine with clean rags. Fit the new filter then screw the assembly back onto the engine. The torque is 40Nm or 30ft/lbs. If you don't have a torque wrench the filter needs to be nipped up tight but don't go mad! Clean the filter plug and fit the new O ring. Lightly oil the ring with clean engine oil and screw the plug back into the filter housing. The torque is 12.5 Nm or 9ft/lbs. Again if you do not have a torque wrench this only needs nipping with a short socket bar or 14mm spanner. Clean the sump plug and refit it to the sump. If the sealing washer is damaged in any way fit a new one (ask Kingo for a new one when ordering the filter). The torque for the plug is 38Nm or 28 ft/lbs or again if you don't have a torque wrench tighten it securely with the 14mm socket and ratchet. Fill the engine with 5.9 litres of 5W/30 semi Synthetic oil. In this photo I have removed the engine cover (it just pulls off) for clarity; With the oil added ensure the gearbox is in neutral and start the engine. Watch the dash board to see that no engine warnings are displayed. When the oil pressure rises in the engine you will hear the engine note change. Go back underneath and check the filter and sump plug are not leaking. Leave the engine running for 5 minutes then check again for leaks. If all is OK refit the flaps. Newer engines will use more oil than older ones so check the oil frequently with the dip stick until consumption has been established. To reset the oil service indicator do as follows; Set the multi-information display to TRIP A. Turn the ignition switch off. Press and hold the ODO / TRIP switch, and turn the ignition switch on (IG). After turning the ignition switch on (IG), keep holding the switch for at least 5 seconds. The reset procedure is complete. Dispose of the oil considerately. All local authority waste disposal sites will take waste oil so will most local garages if you have a good relationship with one. The oily rags and old filter should be disposed of in the same way.
  21. 1 point
    Aygo (first generation 2005 to 2014) - 'in a nutshell' "Aygo" is the phonetic representation of the Japanese word for "English" (Eigo). Pronounced 'I GO' and launched in July 2005 the Aygo is smaller than a modern mini but with clever design has a large interior feel. This car is the child of a joint venture between Toyota, Peugeot and Citroen. By sharing development and manufacturing costs at the assembly plant at Kolin in the Czech Republic (which produces 300 000 cars a year) the 3 manufacturers are able to share platform and running gear but customise their own models with trim and cosmetics to produce the Peugeot 107, Citroen C1 and of course the Toyota Aygo. Built to a high safety standard and with good levels of equipment the car offers a great choice for compact motoring. With low emissions it has a cheap VED banding and is in group 1E (the lowest) insurance category. The small light engine offers good fuel economy but is still able to keep up with traffic pace due to power to weight ratios. The petrol model weighs 890kg - about the same as a blue whale's heart ! A relatively affordable, reliable, runaround car which is cheap to run but has contemporary looks. For a really detailed look at they Aygo including design, chassis, engine, safety, running costs and full specs try this informative site HERE. What Car? have reviewed the Aygo - see the video HERE What is the difference between the Aygo, Aygo +, Aygo Black and Sport trim levels ? The entry-level car is only available in CHILLI RED but is well equipped and includes colour keyed bumpers, rake adjustable steering wheel, twin front airbags, and anti lock brakes with the backup of electronic brakeforce. Add £500 and you move up to the '+' grade which adds upgraded 'flint' cloth seats, 4 more speakers (2 in the rear and 2 small tweeters in the front), the option of metallic paint (extra cost) in CARBON QUARTZ, ICE BLUE or CRYSTAL SILVER, adjustable rear headrests, colour-keyed door mirrors and handles, electric front windows, a split folding rear seat, remote central locking, side airbags and an ISOFIX child seat attachment. Fork out another £500 (£1000 more than the base model) and the Aygo Sport is in reach which gives you in addition to the '+' model spec 14-inch alloy wheels, integrated front fog lights and a rev counter. We think it's a bit annoying that a rev counter is only available on the top spec car - however it is easier than you might think to add one to a 'basic' or 'plus' model yourself using original parts with an end state rev counter that will be indistinguishable from one supplied with a top spec car. The total cost of the parts is around £135 and detail of the part numbers and installation process with step by step photos can be found HERE. In July 2006 a special edition BLACK model was released. This is based on the '+' model but gains black paint included in price, special edition 8 spoke 14-inch alloy wheels, black leather gear knob and aluminium door sill scuff plates with Aygo logo. Prices for the 'black' are approx same as 'sport'. On 14 May 2007 a special edition Aygo BLUE was launched and will feature (as well as the standard met blue paint) a blue speedometer surround, blue stitching in the carpet mats and gear lever gaitor, bluetooth connection, door scuff plates, glove box lid and air con. From the summer of 2007 the 'Sport' model was deleted from the range. Air conditioning is not available on base model and is a cost option for both the '+' and the Sport. Adding the cost option of Air Con also provides an air recirculation control (choice interior air recirculated or fresh air from outside). Auto is not available on base model and is a cost option for both the '+' and the Sport petrol models. A diesel engine is available from model launch until summer 2007 when it was deleted from the range. This engine is not available on base model. All trim levels / engine types are available in either 3 or 5 door variants. What is the fuel economy like ? The official Toyota combined cycle results for fuel economy are 61.4 mpg (21.7 km/ltr) petrol and 68.9 mpg (24.4 km/ltr) diesel. Based on tests in our own cars in the real world of stop / start traffic, cold mornings, speed bumps and traffic jams we have found the petrol is more likely to return around 47 mpg and the diesel 54 mpg. What are the engine specifications ? The petrol engine is a 1KR-FE 3 cylinder in line. It is a true Toyota engine, developed in conjuction with Toyotas subsidary company Daihatsu. The engine is also used in the new Toyota Yaris and is therefore well supported by the company throughout the world for parts. The Diesel engine is not a Toyota plant and has been taken from the french partners. It is a 2WZ-TV 4 cylinder in line. The petrol engine is the lightest in car production with an 'alloy' construction and weighs just 67 Kg. The petrol engine produces 67 bhp and has a displacement of 998 cm3 and the diesel is 1399 cm3. The official acceleration data is 0 - 62 mph (100 km/h) of 14.2 seconds for the petrol with the heavier diesel a little under 3 seconds slower at 16.8 seconds. Owners report that performance figures are actually slightly better than this data suggests but this is not proven. The petrol engines are 12 valve DOHC VVT-i chain drive and the diesel is an 8 valve OHC What performance modifications are available ? Panel air filters from a variety of sources including pipercross, K & N and TRD. Exhaust from Musketier and central exit from TTE. Lowering springs are also available from TTE (see 'What sort of body kits are available ?) and will drop the ride height by approx 30mm as well as improving cornering stability although ride comfort will become harsher. Lowering spring are also officially available from Apex which lower about 35mm. Improved iridium spark plugs from DENSO are available, the reference of the plug is K20HR-U11 There is a very useful website run by a Peugeot 107 owner which contains lots of modifications and tips which apply to the Aygo as well as the 107. His site is HERE. Accessories for the Citroen C1 which should also fit Aygo are available HERE What changes can I make to wheel sizes ? The standard wheels are 14 inch and are supplied with 155/65/14 tyres. You can change to 13, 15 or 16 inch wheels without modifying the bodywork. If you want to keep the standard 14 inch wheels but have wider tyres you can fit 185/55/14, this change will mean that when your are travelling at an indicated 70 mph you will actually be moving at 70.25 mph. You can also fit 195/50/14 tyres and at an indicated 70 mph you will actually be moving at 69.18 mph. When changing wheel and tyre sizes there are 7 considerations. 1. The wheel size. 2. The wheel width. 3. The ET (offset - how far the wheel will stick out from the body work). 4. PCD (pitch circle diameter) the size in mm of a circle drawn through the centre of you wheel bolts. 5. The number of studs (bolts). 6. Tyre size. 7. The impact the changes will have on your speedometer (indicated) readings vs actual speed. For 15 inch wheels you will need to buy rim (wheel) size 15x6.5 ET 37 PCD 4/100. In order to maintain the accuracy of the speedometer with this increased size you will need to put 195/45/15 tyres on. This change will mean that when you are travelling at an indicated 70 mph you will actually be moving at 69.92 mph. Alternatively for 15 inch wheels you can fit 175/50/15 tyres however this choice is limited to just 2 tyre manufacturers as this size is not very common. This change will mean that when you are travelling at an indicated 70 mph you will actually be moving at 69.86 mph. For 16 inch wheels you will need to buy rim (wheel) size 16x6.5 ET 37 PCD 4/100. In order to maintain the accuracy of the speedometer with this increased size you will need to put 195/40/16 tyres on. This change will mean that when you are travelling at an indicated 70 mph you will actually be moving at 70.67 mph. The recommended tyre fitments are therefore 13" 155/70/13, 14" 155/65/14, 15" 195/45/15 and 16" 195/40/16. All wheels are offset 35 – 45 and bore 54.1. Offset 37 is ideal. A handy on line tyre calculator can be found HERE. What are the correct tyre pressures ? For standard size 155/65/R14 Petrol driving under 100 mph (160 kmh) front and rear 32 PSI (2.2 bar) Petrol driving over 100 mph (160 kmh) front and rear 34 PSI (2.3 bar) Diesel driving under 100 mph (160 kmh) front 35 PSI (2.4 bar) and rear 32 PSI (2.2 bar) Diesel driving over 100 mph (160 kmh) front 35 PSI (2.4 bar) and rear 34 PSI (2.3 bar) The standard tyres supplied new with the Aygo in the UK are 'Continental EcoContact 3' T rated (for speeds up to 118 mph). The same tyre is fitted to the spare on a steel wheel. If you want to keep OEM tyres they are widely available for around £30 delivered or about £55 balanced, new valve, fitted and old tyre disposed. Try HERE for latest prices. How do I change the audio set up ? The standard unit supplied with the car is made by Panasonic. Changing the speakers is the easiest way to enhance the sound in your system. For the Aygo you will have to get a set of 100mm wide speakers for the front and back. Speakers are generally sold in pairs. Generally speaking all you have to do is unscrew the old speakers unplug them then connect up the new speakers and screw them in. To access the front speakers (which are on the dash) you will have to remove the plastic cover on the A-Pillar then prise off the speaker cover with your hands from the side. There are only two screws/bolts needed to hold the speakers in the Aygo therefore on your new speakers you will have to snip off two screw-hole prongs that are not needed, then put your new speakers in place and screw them in. Fitting a subwoofer: You have two choices in this section:- 1. Buying the official Toyota subwoofer from a dealer 2. Fitting your own subwoofer purchased from an car audio shop Using the official Toyota subwoofer it would be mounted underneath the front driver’s seat. This is done by wiring it in by removing the front drivers seat and running the cable supplied along the centre console next to the gear shift. Fitting your own would involve wiring the power for your amplifier from the battery. The thickness of this wire depends on the power of your amplifier. The best place to run the power cable for the subwoofer on the Aygo is the opposite side from the battery as the main wiring loom grommet comes through the bulkhead on the drivers side of the car. Also the remote turn on for the subwoofer should be wired to pin 7 (white wire) on the power plug as this is the ignition power for the radio, so the subwoofer only turns on when the ignition is on. You would also have to RCA cables (phono) for the audio signal which would run down the nearside. This would come from the headunit. To use the original headunit that came with the car you will need to purchase a high level to low level converter for the RCA cables. How do I undo the petrol cap ? Opening fuel tank - 1. open cover flap 2. insert key 3. turn key quarter of a turn anti clockwise 4. turn key quarter turn clockwise (back to start position) 5. remove key 6. unscrew petrol cap anti clockwise to re fit - 1. locate petrol cap in threaded sleeve 2. turn clockwise until resistance is felt 3. once at resistance point apply additional pressure clockwise turning until you hear a click (locking mechanism has now engaged again) 4. turn anti clockwise as a test and cap should not undo 5. close cover flap What sort of body kits are available ? Spoilers, side skirts, front spats and rear splitters are all available from TTE. The colour brochure can be viewed HERE. The prices for the TTE parts incl VAT are :front spats £183.58, rear skirt £211.62, roof spoiler £206.45, side skirts £230.81, sports silencer £393.46, lowering springs £167.57. These prices are correct @ April 2006 and include VAT but not painting to body colour or fitting. Any TTE part can be ordered through a Toyota dealer who can also arrange painting and fitting. TTE accessories fitted to the car do not invalidate your Toyota warranty. A body kit is also available from J M Car Styling Can I change the rather small rear wiper for a larger one ? Yes, you can use a 16" rear wiper which clears more glass area and will fit with no modifications. The front blade is 26'' size. Click HERE for a fast reasonably priced mail order wiper blade service. How do I debadge it ? First it helps if it is a hot day - park the badged end right in the sun to get it hot or hold a hair dryer to the badges. Use gentle sweeping movements across the badges to soften the glue. Once the glue is hot enough that you can flex the badge with your fingers use some dental floss behind the badge and gently use a sawing motion to lift the badge away. You will need to stop, re apply the heat etc. quite a few times for each badge. Once the badge is off you will have residue left from the glue. There are basically 2 ways to remove this 1. good quality 'bug / tar' remover which is widely available. 2. gentle, gentle picking and scraping with flat edged objects and fingernails ! Once all glue is removed clean the area with your regular products and apply wax / polish to protect. The 'Aygo' and 'Sport' badges are fairly quick and painless (but leave holes) the big 'T' emblem on the glass boot is hard to get off but the glue cleans off easier being based on glass. Allow about 1.5 hour for the whole job. What are the common niggles ? This list makes the Aygo sound bad - which it isn't ! However here are some of the things which owners have pointed out to us - 'Toyota' if you are reading this please take note for the first revision ! ! 1. Hazard warning lights / rear demist button don't light up 2. Only 1 boot strut 3. Interior light not switched on passenger door 4. No temp gauge 5. Rattly interior 'A' Pillar plastic 6. Cheap looking gear knob (easily change circa £17 or so) 7. No boot light 8. Rear glass boot hatch knob sometimes doesn't click out again after being pressed in 9. Rear wiper slow and ineffective 10. Front wiper can leave stripes 11. Sound system is quite poor 12. Gets dirty very quickly (especially the back) 13. Brakes grind when first pressed if not used for a while 14. Carpet in drivers footwell wears at clutch touching point 15. Interior door handle pull covers are prone to weaken 16. Weak security 17. When raining, opening the rear hatch allows water to run from the glass hatch inside the car 18. The seat recline function (3 door models) have no 'memory' so it can be awkward adjusting the front seats back to the desired position once moved to allow rear access What type of oil does it use ? Petrol engine uses a preferred 5W-30 but in warm climates (where engine will not be exposed to less than -10 degrees) 20W-50 or 15W-40 can be used, Diesel is 5W-30 or 5W-40 only. Both engines hold 3.3 litres with filter. Only use fully synthetic oil. How much fuel can it hold ? 35 litres (7.7 imp gal) How much is VED (road tax) ? For all models the CO2 emissions on the petrol model are 109g/Km which makes the VED £35 per year. It is not possible to buy 6 months duty
  22. 1 point
    You will spill a little diesel so place some rags or an old sheet of ply under the car. With the air filter in place you can't see the wood for the trees so whip that off! Undo the hose clips at each end of the inlet pipe; ....and the finger clips on the breather pipe; .....then lift the pipe out of the way; Unclip the air filter cover and unplug the wires from the air flow meter, remove the filter and now you can get at the bolts in the bottom of the filter casing. Remove the 10mm bolts; ......and now you can see what you are doing with the filter quite nicely. You shouldn't be able to mix up the fuel pipes but if in any doubt just mark one or put a bit of tape on it. Use a pair of pliers to squeeze the clips and slide it down the pipe a little; Wriggle the pipes to loosten then pull them down off the filter head. Now by squeezing the anchor clips, unplug those "suspect" wiring plugs from the heater; .....and the water ingress switch; Now you will have to prize the plugs off the inner wing. One broke on this car shown but there isn't much you can do to avoid it and you might have to use a tie wrap afterwards. You could try softening the plastic by carefully pouring very hot water on it but don't lose any sleep over it! With everything disconnected you can unbolt the housing off the bracket, however, if you don't have a vice just loosten the filter with a filter wrench now while it is still attached; Lift the assembly off and take it to the bench; CAREFULLY grip it in the vice and use water pump pliers to pop that water switch off; It is false economy not to fit a new filter at the same time so using all new seals lightly oiled with clean engine oil or diesel, screw the new filter to the new head and the water switch to the bottom of the filter. It might be an idea to do this with the filter in the upright position to make sure the seals do not get displaced. Assemble the parts loosely first making sure the seals don't twist then carefully grip the head in the vice and nip them all up. They only need to be hand tight - don't get carried away! On my photos it is just a filter change so the old head is refitted. Take the assembly back to the car and refit it. Connect both plugs, slide the pipes back on and reposition the clips. Now with everything back on you will need to prime the air out of the system. Simply pump that black plunger on the head until it becomes quite stiff; Now that is done you can refit the air filter and hose and don't forget that plug on the airflow meter. When you start the engine for the first time it might cough a little bit as the last remnants of air are purged but don't worry about that. .
  23. 1 point
    Hello, I decided to share with you a video which I recorded. The video is a guide for how to disable the annoying seatbelt alarm sound. You can also see detailed instructions in the video description. The video is uploaded on youtube : Thanks for watching. Regards, George NOTE: TOC cannot endorse or condone the removal of any safety systems :( Users should consider the above before following the guide as it may have adverse affects with your car insurance.
  24. 1 point
    Since the aygo haynes manual is a little shy of info & there is still a demand for this, here is the definitive list; Here's how to reset the MMT brain AYGO MMT RESET.pdf Layout of the parts AYGO MMT PART LAYOUT.pdf System diagram AYGO MMT GEARBOX.pdf Construction & operation AYGO MMT OPS.pdf Function of main components AYGO MMT PART FUNCTION.pdf How the MMT ecu makes decisions (including diagnostic trouble codes DTC ) AYGO MMT SYS OPS.pdf 2019 update: Here's a link to a bunch of useful service, service bulletin and general tech info http://bit.ly/AygoData
  25. 1 point
    What is a Dual Mass Flywheel? The flywheel is effectively a weight which is fastened to the end of the crankshaft of the engine. The power from the pistons tends to be created in "pulses" and the weight of the flywheel smoothes out these pulses by providing inertia to the rotating engine. As well as providing a weight the flywheel has a gear around its circumference on which the starter motor operates and is a convenient means of attaching the clutch which provides a variable connection to the transmission. Modern diesel engines generate high torque and as a result they need extra smoothing out or "damping". To help with this process a DMF (Dual Mass Flywheel) is fitted. This is effectively two flywheels that transmit the drive through a number of springs which cushion the drive to the transmission. Please look at the bottom of this post to see a description of what a flywheel does. Is DMF failure inevitable? No not necessarily. Some vehicles cover very high mileages and do not have any problems. Whether the DMF fails depends on what kind of duty the vehicle is subjected to and to some extent the way the vehicle is driven. What happens when the DMF fails? In practical terms, the first an owner will know is likely to be either a vibration and/or metallic jingling noise. The time these symptoms take to manifest themselves as a complete failure will vary dramatically. A complete failure will probably result in not being able to select any gears or in extreme cases a complete loss of drive. However, it is recommended that if any of the symptoms described are experienced that the vehicle is taken immediately to a suitably equipped workshop for further investigation. This may avoid the inconvenience of a roadside breakdown and the associated recovery costs. The DMF on early models (up to those produced in August 2002) could under certain conditions come loose. This is the statement form Toyota GB regarding this matter; "The issue regarding Dual Mass Flywheels relates to RAV4 CLA20 and CLA21 models (early diesel vehicles) and was found to be that under hard use (towing etc) the flywheel securing bolts were unable to provide sufficient tightness. This was remedied by an improved flywheel and revised fastening and tightening processes, which were introduced into RAV4 vehicle production from August 2002. The improvements were made from VIN numbers, JT EYG20V400009863 JT EHG20V600026183 JT EHG20V606013132 With our commitment to customer satisfaction the warranty was extended for a period outside of the normal 3 year or 60,000 mile warranty. Because a production line fix was introduced from August 2002 claims would only be accepted on vehicles manufactured prior to this date. This extended period ran for 5 years or 100,000 miles (whichever comes first) and as such would therefore have expired in August 2007. I have to confirm that no extra time or mileage will be added to this warranty extension and all Toyota Centres are aware of the above information. My recommendation would be that owners who experience a failure outside of this period should contact their Toyota Centre and if they feel it appropriate, contact would be made to our Customer Relations Department for their consideration." Some Toyota Centres have insisted that a new that I have the ECU changed as well as the DMF and this costs more. Why is this? If there is evidence of heat related damage the Service Department may recommend that a re-programmed ECU is fitted to reduce the possibility of damage due to clutch slip. The Toyota Centre will advise you if any of the cost of this work can be met under the terms of the warranty. Why is it so expensive to change the DMF? The DMF is quite a complex part of your vehicle and it is fitted between the engine and the gearbox. To change it requires all of the gearbox and transfer box oil to be drained, then the front to rear drive shaft, transfer box , gearbox and all of the clutch components need to be removed. The vehicle has to be elevated and there is quite a lot of labour involved. What are Toyota doing about this and are any extended warranties available? Toyota are committed to ensuring that their vehicles perform reliably throughout their life and have provided this statement; "It is always concerning to learn of any product failure and if this does occur then we do look to the reasons to understand why this has occurred and take steps to prevent this from happening again in the future. This usually follows a remedy to the source on the production line, along with a modified part (normally identified by a superseded part number). As you have correctly advised the issue regarding the failure of the Dual Mass Flywheel on Toyota RAV4's has involved a revised tightening procedure from August 2002 production along with a modified part now supplied to the Toyota Centre Network. Should an owner suspect their vehicle has a problem then our advice would always be to take this along to their Toyota Centre to be remedied. Toyota Centres are kept updated through our technical and warranty teams to ensure they are always aware of the very latest information in respect of our model range and be able to advise owners on a recommended course of action should this affect their vehicle. With any failures outside of the Toyota warranty, which is 3 years or 60,000 miles whichever comes sooner, and no extended warranty has been purchased, then this would be dealt with on an individual basis between that owner and their Toyota Centre. This would also include any requests for goodwill outside of the warranty period." Is this problem only applicable to Toyotas? Absolutely not. A large number of vehicles from all manufacturers employ dual mass flywheels. To some extent their use is a necessary requirement with the evolution of modern high powered diesel engines to provide smooth operation and prevent any damage being caused to any other parts of the vehicle. Do I have to take my RAV to a Toyota dealer for repair? No. You can take your Toyota to any suitably equipped workshop. However, you should be sure that you have past experience of them or they come well recommended as the job is rather long and complicated. You can be sure that a Toyota workshop has all the necessary facilities to complete the work properly and a Toyota Centre will have access to guaranteed Genuine Parts and any information regarding modified or improved parts and processes that may not be available elsewhere. I am thinking of buying a second hand RAV 4. Can I tell if the DMF is faulty? You can test drive the vehicle and make sure it does not suffer from any excessive vibration. It is highly unlikely that you could detect any problems unless the failure was imminent. If in any doubt take the vehicle to a suitably equipped workshop for a professional opinion. Most reputable dealers will provide a suitable warranty and motoring organisations will test the vehicle for a fee. Should the possibility of any problems stop me from buying a diesel engined RAV 4? No. These are generally a very reliable and highly regarded vehicle that will provide many years of trouble free service. This section gives more information on the role of the flywheel and the DMF The flywheel has to be heavy as it maintains the inertia of the engine. When the four pistons come down on the power stroke it is like they are being shot down the barrel of a cannon and they all take it in turns - 1,3,4,2. The trouble is that the next one in sequence does not start until the previous one as right at the bottom of the stroke so the turning moment on the crankshaft is very "lumpy". The crankshaft is like the pedals on a bicycle (except instead of two there are four in a row), it turns the reciprocating (up and down) motion of the pistons into rotary motion that is eventually connected to the wheels. In order to make the engine rotate smoothly, a flywheel which is nothing more than a very heavy round weight is bolted onto the rear of the crankshaft. When the mass of this flywheel gets spinning it helps to remove the "lumpyness" of when one piston gets to the botttom of a cylinder and the next one being fired from the top. In very old single and double cylinder engines it had to be huge to keep the engine turning. On this traction engine it is up by the driving cab; You can see it very clearly on this single cylinder steam engine; You can imagine that without this flywheel to carry the piston around to the next power stroke the engine would stop. In really big engines you need a really big flywheel and in this mill engine at Wigan Pier it weighs 70 tons; Its hard for you to get a feel for just how big that is but if you look to the lower right of the picture there is a large double doorway into the mill. The flywheel has to be massive because it drives thousands of machines in the factory and as it is a spinning mill it is important that they turn at a constant speed. Now we relate the role of the flywheel to the D4D engine. In most cars the flywheel would be a relatively simple affair - just a weight as already stated but these small modern diesels are phenominally powerful for their size and the power strokes are effectively very "lumpy". You can imagine that if you fired the pedals down on your bike with a cannon instead of pushing them with your legs then the bike would be very jerky! Of course you could fit an even bigger flywheel on an engine to smooth out the lumps but there are limitations because; They absorb more of the engines power, it would rev up slowly and also slow down slowly which effects performance and slows down the gear changing process by having to wait for the speeds of different gears to synchronise. They use more fuel. They are difficult to accommodate. So the way that modern diesels are smoothed out is with a Dual Mass Flywheel similar to the one in this diagram; You can see that the flywheel is in two pieces. One is connected to the pistons (and dont forget that there are four pistons) and then the other is connected to the transmission via a set of annular springs around the circumference of the flywheel. These springs absorb the lumpyness of the pistons and transmit smooth rotary motion to the transmission. It makes the car feel smoother to drive and almost eliminates any vibration that would cause knock on damage to the clutch and gearbox. In this picture of a failed DMF belonging to one of our members, you can see that the bolts have become loose and the resultant damage around the eight fixing holes as the flywheel eventually worked loose. This problem was addressed during August 2002 and should no longer occur. However, as the DMF is no longer a simple one piece design and has become more complex it is not impossible for it to fail in other ways. It should not be confused with clutch wear or failure which is considered a consumable wearing part. This short clip of a VW DMF shows the result of the drive springs failing; and this is a good one but note there is still some play; This is a very nice animation of how the DMF is assembled and how it turns big vibrations into small ones; ......and this from LUK on how to test one; Please follow this link to discuss; http://toyotaownersclub.com/forums/index.p...t=0#entry701716
  26. 1 point
    If anyone still needs information on how to change the spark plugs on a 998cc IQ, I’ve provided details below after completing the job this afternoon. It should take about 90 minutes and is pretty straightforward. Tools required: 10mm socket, 10mm spark plug socket and extension, cross head screwdriver, flat head screwdriver, 3 new denso iridium spark plugs 1. Disconnect the battery connections 2. Loosen the clamps on the large inlet rubber pipe (cross head screwdRiver or 10mm socket) and the clip on the small side pipe on the right hand side of this pipe - and remove 3. Disconnect the 2 electrical plugs on either side of the throttle body (which the inlet pipe goes into. To do this you willl need to press down the clip on side of the connector and ease it off. A flat head screwdriver can help to press down the tab and ease the plug off. It may be useful to disconnect the clamp which holds the wires, by pressing on either side on the tabs where the connector mounts. 4. There are 4 bolts / nuts holding the throttle body in place. Remove the 3 bolts on the front of the throttle body using a 10mm socket. Remove the 10mm nut on the right hand side and slide the throttle body forward. You may want to unclip the 2 rubber hoses at the top of the throttle body where they clip into rubber clips - just press upwards with your fingers to unclip 5. Slide the throttle body forward until it is just clear of the stud which the 4th nut was connected to. Then lift the throttle body up by a couple of inches and insert the stud into the mounting hole. This will keep the throttle body out of the way and ensure that the coolant hoses are not damaged 6. You will then see the 3 coil packs in front of you. Each is held in place with a 10mm bolt. Start with the first one - order isn’t important. Undo the bolt and disconnect the electrical connector. To do this pres down on the tab on top of the connector and ease off. As before, a flat head screwdriver can help here. Then pull out the coil pack and put to one side 7. Using the spark plug spanner, remove the spark plug. This takes a while as the thread on the spark plug is quite long. Screw in the new spark plug to a torque of 15ft lb. insert the coil pack attach the electrical connector and bolt down with the bolt. No torque setting here, but needs to be pretty tight. The hardest thing here is getting the socket off the spark plug - it took a bit of jiggling to get it off. 8. Repeat for the 2 other plugs. I found to get enough clearance for the middle plug, I had to take the throttle body off the stud and lift a bit higher, taking care not to put strain on coolant pipes 9. Refit the throttle body using the 3 bolts and the nut (to connect to the stud) 10. Reattach the electrical plugs on either side of the throttle body, and the connector holding the wire in place, if you removed it 11. Reattach the inlet pipe, and tighten the 2 clamps at either end and the clip holding the smaller side tube in place 12. Reconnect the battery terminals 13. Start car and congratulate yourself for saving so much money by not getting the dealer to do it for you and that it’s 60,000 miles until you have to do it again! I hope this is useful to someone.
  27. 1 point
    Weber State University (WSU) - Department of Automotive Technology video on how to check battery voltage and function. In the comments below the video they show video run times of various checks.
  28. 1 point
    Here is how to fix contact dealer showing on your TNS510 usually seen after picking your car up from a service where the dealer has disconnected the battery whilst doing the service. Also seen when trying to start your car with a virtually flat battery. When the battery is disconnected the TNS510 looses its operating system in memory, it can be reinstalled with a SD map card currently £136 in the UK If you never had a map card in the unit or it was lost/stolen then you can get your radio etc working with this method 1, You will need a blank 4gb SD card 2, Copy the "loading.kwi" file the the card 3, Insert the card into the TNS510 and turn the ignition on first stage only (do not start the engine) 4, You will see a yellow progress bar on the screen 5, wait until its finished and your radio will spring to life again 6, If your Map SD card has become corrupt due to you trying to start the car with a flat battery, then you can use the card you made to get the TNS510 working then swap it for your original Map SD card 7, You can overwrite the Loading.kwi file in your Map SD card with the file on here to fix the Map card David (Tarquin) from iQ forum)
  29. 1 point
    This is a simple job that does not seem to be covered in the owner's manual, and there is no obvious way of access in the bulb. I used my plastic trim removal tools, so reduce the risk of damage. I carefully probed around until I was sure where the release catch is located - Now you know. The clue is seeing which way the bulb is fitted. Drivers vanity light. Inserting tool to feel the catch. Lever to tool to release the catch, popping the light fitting out. Better view of the light fitting. Standard 501 5w bulb. The courtesy lights access is similar. Near the centre away from the switch side use a suitable tool to lever at the hinge side of the lens. The lens comes away easily. Working the other hinge. Close-up of the hinge. The lens removed showing the hinges and the tag on the switch side. Another view of the lens. The switch side of the lens and fitting. Good access to the bulb after removing the lens. A photo from 1½ year ago when removing a dead insect, that was there when I bought the car. The T27 uses 501 bulbs for all the courtesy and vanity lights. May work with LED versions. I had to remember to slide the mirror cover open, to switch the vanity light on.
  30. 1 point
    I found these manual on the net, n thought may be useful for someone. EWD398F YARIS VERSO ECHO VERSO ELECTRICAL WIRING DIAGRAM.zip RM726E YARIS VERSO ECHO VERSO REPAIR MANUAL FOR CHASSIS AND BODY.zip RM910E YARIS ECHO REPAIR MANUAL SUPPLEMENT FOR CHASSIS AND BODY.zip
  31. 1 point
    The symptoms. The MPG is disgraceful this time last year we was averaging no less than 38mpg over a tank and around 42-45mpg when driven on a run with cruise control set at 70mph. Over Christmas we did approx 1500miles and have managed best on a run +4oc 31mpg driving with cruise control set at 70mph, when it was cold we was down to 21mpg and have now risen to around 30mpg driving like your gran going to church. These figures are a long way short of the figures that Toyota quote and of what we was achieving this time last year with similar temperatures, it may be worth noting the car makes a pinking sound at around 1800-2300rpm if you put your foot down and there is a small delay / flat spot in throttle response (not turbo lag) when you press the accelerator, I suspect this is the fly by wire throttle system but is it supposed to have a delay? How to clean, I did have to borrow a few pictures as I had cleaned mine by the time I made this thread. 1. Remove the engine cover, this just pulls up and unclips. 2. Now you can see the EGR Valve, you will need a 12mm socket, Ratchet and extension to remove this. 3. Remove these 2 x bolts 1st for the pipe above the EGR valve. 4. Now undo the other 4 x 12mm nuts and bolts from the EGR valve and unplug this from the wiring loom, this can now be removed. 5. This is now what you will find. Dirty manifold with 2 x blocked breathing holes. Dirty EGR valve with restricted air flow. 6. I cleaned these using an old toothbrush, small screw driver, carburettor cleaner, old cloth and a dyson cleaner to suck the muck out. Try to scrape and brush out the thick carbon then use the carburettor cleaner to clean the finish this off. Now once all this is cleaned out just simply refit, This took me a total of 15 minutes so I assure you this is very easy. The results This will vary for everyone but in my experience I did a 360mile round trip the next day with mainly cruise control set at 70mph, going there (more downhill) the roads where very very wet with poor visibility and approx 7oc and we averaged 41.1MPG by the time we got there. When we come home with mainly cruise control set at 70mph, slightly uphill most of the way the roads where dry and approx 3oc the average MPG had dropped to 40.0. When I filled up we got 37.4litres in the tank which I rounded up to 38 and worked out at 43MPG (I always brim the tank). This is now showing a big improvement / approx 20% for a 15minute job of cleaning the EGR valve. I will also note the slight flat spots in throttle response are a lot less than before. I would like to say a big thank you to cabcurtains for bringing the EGR valve to my attention and to twingo69 as I borrowed a few pictures from his thread to make this guide. UPDATE Ok it has been nearly 5 months and around 4k since I did this do this morning I thought I would check the EGR valve. To be honest the manifold was very very clean maybe a small less than 1mm coating of carbon and the EGR valve had a little more, I did clean this again while it was removed but in my opinion looking at what I seen today I would recommend cleaning this around every 12months or 10k. UPDATE Well over the next 12 months the MPG just continued to drop, Toyota claimed there was no problems with the car but by Feb 11 we could only manage 28-32MPG at best. I had also noticed the car had started to do a lot of DPF recycle burns and suspect the DPF was maybe on its way out, we had no warrenty left on the car so had a shop around and exchanged for a 5 month old 500 mile CRZ. What can I say but for sure the CRZ is one of the best cars we ever owned and was fantastic on fuel (49MPG average for every turn of the key over 9 months and 9000 miles) but due to the birth of Lewis we needed a bigger car so exchanged this for a CTR (FN2), I will say that so far over 7000 miles this has returned 29MPG for us which puts a quicker petrol car in the same area as the T180 when we traded this in. What never made sence was when we first bought the T180 we could get 40-44MPG no problem then at around 30'000 miles the MPG just started to drop while nothing really changed, we never found a cure for this or a fault but for sure this is problem and Toyota must know about this because they dropped the 2.2 and 2.0 Auris diesel cars and have now agreed to use BMW diesel engines from 2013. Why the worlds largest car manufacturer would need to use a BMW diesel engine is beyond me unless it shows they are struggling to get a modern diesel to be clean and efficient while being very driveable.
  32. 1 point
    This is a short workshop for changing the ignition switch on an Avensis 2.0 1999. I've had problems with starting the engine since beginning of summer. The symptoms were like this; when turning the key to the START position, nothing happens. You have to, either turn it from ON to START a few times or wiggle the key while holding it in the START position, to get connection in the lock to start the motor. This is due to a faulty switch behind the locking barrel, that has been worn down so it does not alway connect. This has nothing to do with the imobilizer system or coding of keys, it is only a mechanical problem and will not be solved by re-coding the keys or such. Be ware, the dealer gave me the wrong part on my first order; I described the symptoms and where the part is located and they knew exactly what I needed, after a long search in their computer they came up with the part I nedded. It was not in stock so they ordered it. What I got was a part called something like Coding Unit/Computer Unit remote control (PN 89780-05011). It's a part in black plastic casing with the front ring around the keyhole (with the text ACC/ON/START) and a short cable with a connector. This is the receiver of the coded keys and it is the wrong part, also it's more expensive and doesn't solve this problem. When I called them on the phone and described the symptoms again and told them I've got the wrong part, they looked again and came back to me saying that it was the correct part I've got. After a little convincing that I had a mechanical problem and not a computer problem, he discussed with another guy and finally they found the correct part. I've had a lot of help from member GnzYza in 'Problems with starting', where you can read how it all started. Once again, thank GnzYza. 1. First you need to get the new part from a Toyota dealer. The part you need is the SWITCH ASSY, partnumber 84450-02010 (at least for my Avensis -99, but it gives you something to start with at Toyota). 2. Disassembling. You'll need a cross/pozidrive screwdrive of medium size, that's all you need. (It might come in handy with some kind of light because it's rather dark behind the dashboard) First remove the dash casing below the steering wheel, there are 2 black screws, one to the left... ...and one to the right and also the golden screw under the cowling. Turn the steering wheel so you'll see the last 2 screws behing the wheel... to the left... ...and to the right. 3. Carefully pull the dash casing a bit outwards in the bottom and slide it down to remove it. There are 3 things stuck to this part; the wire for the front hood, an airtube and a wire with connector on it. These can remain in place, just put the casing on the floor. 4. Separate the top and bottom parts of the cowling, there are only small plastic lockers holding them together now, so a little bending with a screwdriver in the joint between them would do it. The joint is on both the left and the right side, you'll see it clearly if you look close. The top one could needs not to be removed, but the bottom one does. It might be easier if you loosen the locking handle for adjusting the height of the stearing wheel. 5. Now you should have access to everything under the cowling. Don't be alarmed, it is not so much you have to care about, it is just very much cabling in a very tight space. Locate the rear of the ignition barrel, where you'll find following parts attached to it: A and B are just connectors placed on the Switch Assy, remove them, but don't disconnect them. C is the connector on the Switch Assy. Disconnect it and fold it away. D is the actual Switch Assy. The arrow points to one of the two screws that holds it in place. (The easy one...) 6. Change the Switch Assy Remove the two screws that holds the Switch Assy to the rear of the barrel. One is easy to get at, but the other one is rather tricky to access. The screws might fall off so don't loose them! Once they are removed, pull the case of the Switch Assy away from the barrel. You can't pull it off all the way, so you'll have to turn it 45 degrees and try to get it out sideways. There are no loose parts there so you are rather free to remove it any way you can. Just keep in mind how you did it since you have to get the new part in, the same way. 7. Assembling. Place the screw that was hard to get at, in it's hole on the new Switch Assy before placing it in position. It is very hard to get it in place through all cables. Now, just tighten the screws for the Switch Assy, re-connect the cable (is only one way), fit the two connectors you removed in the beginning, and you're finshed with the hard part. Fit the bottom part of the cowling again, remember to have all plastic notches in their place. The parts will lock together nicely, fit the 2 screws behind the steering wheel again and also the bottom one. Place the dash casing in it's place; top first them push in the bottom. Screw it tight in place. 8. Finished. This is not a hard work and it took me around 25 minutes (including taking the photos). After that my car has started without a problem. The Switch Assy costed 900 SEK (> £60) but the garage told me they would charge me around 4500 SEK (>£300) to do the change. I don't know how they'd charge me so much for this easy job and now that I know how easy it was, I'd never accept a bill from them with that amount. I hope this workshop will help somebody in the future, if so, please post you comments on it. Good luck.
  33. 1 point
    See - http://blog.toyota.co.uk/fix-condensation-inside-car
  34. 1 point
    Difficulty: Easy-ish Time: About 1 hour Tools: Two 17mm spanners - ring and open. Long spanners may help. As the chart below shows, it's quite normal for a shock absorber to have traces of oil around the top. However leaks like level 3 to 1 mean the shock absorber (SA) needs replacing. Probably a good idea to replace in pairs. As always, apply hand-brake, chock the opposite front wheel and without the vehicle raised, slightly slacken off the road wheel nuts. Jack the vehicle up and place on an axle stand: (note to self - it's a good idea to secure the stand with the split pin on the chain!) 2009 and beyond models are fitted with superdooperGoFasterAerodynamicFuelSaverGizmos to the rear suspension arms on each side. It makes things a bit easier, by removing this. Easily done with a 10mm socket. Support the suspension arm with the jack and remove the road wheel. Place a piece of wood between the jack head and the suspension arm, to prevent damage to the arm: (No the drive doesn't slope, must have had too much vino, picture is on the tilt). The vehicle should feel firmly supported now. Don't gamble with this - it's not worth it. The shock absorber is attached top and bottom with bolts and nuts. Shown here with nuts and bolts partly and fully removed. The bottom bolt is not too bad to access, the top is the worst, which is where you may need the open ended spanner. Obviously hold the bolt head with one spanner, while releasing the nut with the other. The bottom bolt attaches through a carrier, which in turn is attached to the wheel "hub" assembly. The bottom SA bolt will not come out unless this carrier is removed. The suspension arm is in the way and prevents the bolt coming fully out. If the bolt was inserted the opposite way around, there would be no problem and the bolt would come out, without removing the carrier. I suspect it is done like this so that if the bolt should come loose, it cannot drop out completely. Look underneath the "hub" and you will see two bolts: These attach the carrier to the "hub". Although I couldn't see how there could possibly be any relative movement, it's not a bad idea to place match marks before removing anything suspension related. It can save a whole heap of re-alignment later. In fact, the carrier doesn't have to be removed, slacking the bolts off a little and lowering the carrier, as shown, is enough to remove the bottom SA bolt. Once you have the top and bottom SA bolts out, the SA itself should come out easily: At time of writing part number is 48531-42240. Same part is used for both sides (no surprise really). Always check that the part number hasn't been updated. When refitting, the piece of metal welded to the lower part of the SA, goes towards the front of the vehicle. Some out of focus, installed SA pictures: Replace the top and bottom SA bolts and nuts. Torque up the SA carrier bolts to 80lbft. The top and bottom SA bolts are also 80 lbft. The bottom SA bolt is easy, but the top one is difficult to get a torque wrench to (At least with my kit), so I used "mechanicing judgement" on that one. Replace the road wheel and the superdooperGoFasterAerodynamicFuelSaverGizmo. Lower the vehicle. Road wheel nuts are 76 lbft. If you, can bounce the suspension a bit. Toyota procedure calls for the rear suspension alignment to be checked at this point. Unless there is other suspension damage repair, or tyres are scrubbing, I don't see that it is necessary. It's quite an involved process too. So, there you are. Next time the spotty "youf" in Kwikfit or wherever, tells you your shocks need replacing, thank him kindly for the advise, then check yourself and if necessary, replace them yourself.
  35. 1 point
    Just a reminder If one has Toyota Roadside Assistance on a current vehicle, and one is looking to change to another Toyota, for the remaining balance of one's existing mermbership one can either - get a refund, or, - transfer the balance onto any complimentary membership for the new vehicle. To do either of the above contact Toyota Roadside Assistance - https://www.toyota.co.uk/caring-for-your-toyota/owners/roadside-assistance.json
  36. 1 point
    For our members outside the UK, please find a description of the current UK vehicle registration system: In the UK, when new vehicles are purchased they have to be registered with the UK Government, issued with a registration number, the appropriate annual vehicle tax paid, and insured. Registration number have to be displayed both on the front and rear on ‘registration plates’. Registration plates have to conform to a British Standard, which specifies what the plate can contain, the font and size of font used, etc. This is partly to ensure that the registration number can be read from a distance of 75 metres. Vehicle registrations are commonly referred to as: 'registration numbers', 'registration plates', 'plates', etc. As regards registering a vehicle, two systems are in operation: 1. One for England, Scotland and Wales, and, 2. One for Northern Ireland. ENGLAND, SCOTLAND & WALES: The current registration system was introduced from 1st September 2001. Registration plates should be reflective white with black font at the vehicle front, and reflective yellow with black font at the rear. Registration numbers/plates look like this: The COUNTRY IDENTIFIER is optional and can be either: The EU symbol or national flag, and one of the national identifiers (eg. UK, GB (Great Britain), SCO (Scotland), WALES, etc). The AREA CODE identifies which area the car was first registered in. The first letter identifies the broad area – A – Anglia: B – Birmingham: C – Cymru (Wales): D- Deeside: E – Essex: F – Forest and Fens; G – Garden of England: H – Hampshire and Dorset: K – Milton Keynes: L - London: M – Manchester and Merseyside: N - North: O – Oxford: P - Preston: R – Reading: S – Scotland: T – used temporarily for Scotland: V – Severn Valley: W – West of England: Y – Yorkshire. The second letter sub-divides the broad area. The AGE IDENTIFIER denotes when the car was first registered. The age identifier changes on the 1st March and the 1st September each year – for example: 01/09/2001 to 28/02/2002 – 51 01/03/2002 to 31/08/2002 – 02 01/09/2002 to 28/02/2003 – 52 01/03/2003 to 31/08/2003 – 03 This system is designed to run through until 2050. The year identifiers for 2015 are: a. To 28/02/2015 – 64 b. 01/03/2015 to 31/08/2015 – 15 c. From 01/09/2015 – 65 The three remaining letters are RANDOM. NORTHERN IRELAND: A Northern Ireland registration number looks like this: Again one has the optional COUNTRY IDENTIFIER. The current system has the first letter and the numbers running in series. For example the series will run to A**9998, then to B**9998,then to C**9988, and so on. The second and third letters are the COUNTY or CITY CODE – for example: AZ – Belfast: BZ – Down: HZ – Tyrone: etc.
  37. 1 point
    Given the fact there have been a couple of threads in recent months about handbrakes 'failing', thought it would be useful to include text of a recent Which? conversation: - "Our recent survey discovered that 25% of Which? members never leave their car in gear, even when it’s parked on a hill. Conversely, 35% will always leave it in gear, with the practice more prevalent amongst drivers over the age of 65. This sensible precaution is likely to become more widely practiced soon. That’s because new changes to the driving test in April 2014 now sees learners taught to leave a car in gear and apply the parking brake no matter where it’s parked. So what should you actually be doing? Leaving your car in gear Well we spoke to Mark Lewis, director of standards for the Institute of Advanced Motorists (IAM), to help clear things up. Mark told us: ‘There is little need to leave a manual vehicle in gear when parked and unattended if the parking brake is working effectively. Vehicles fitted with automatic gearboxes get locked into park even though they have a parking brake.’ However, when parking on a hill it can be prudent to leave a car in gear in case the handbrake fails. As Mark pointed out: ‘On an uphill incline turn the wheels away from the kerb and leave the vehicle in first gear. Similarly when facing downhill, the vehicle may be left in reverse and the wheels turned towards the kerb.’ He also told us that drivers should de-clutch before starting the car – a requirement on more modern vehicles – to prevent it jerking forwards unexpectedly. Depressing the clutch also reduces wear on the starter motor. Applying the handbrake With the advent of the electronic parking brake, operated via a switch or button rather than a lever, there is less chance of the handbrake cable working loose over time, and eventually failing to hold the car properly. But in my experience these electronic parking brakes are hit or miss as to whether pressing the button actually activates them. Although you’re soon reminded as your car gently rolls away as you try and get out."
  38. 1 point
    Difficulty - Easy Time - 5 minutes. Tools - None Frequency - Normal Conditions: 14000 miles Dusty conditions: 12 months or 9000 miles UK Part No and price TBA by Lindop Brothers Toyota in subsequent post. Additional information - Further diagrams can be found on page 276/279 of the Owners Handbook (LHD shown). Filter may not be fitted to models with manual air conditioning. Introduction To improve the environment inside the car, a clean air filter is fitted to the heater intake. This is intended to remove dust and particles that would otherwise enter the car. The filter fitted to the RAV is a particulate filter which has been electrostatically charged to capture the finest particles that are also positive or negatively charged and attracted to the filter. New filters are snow white but soon become blackened by the volume of tiny particles trapped within them. The result as well as a fresher interior is cleaner interior and air vents etc. A filter that is becoming clogged will also starve the interior of fresh air and windows will quickly steam up so it is very important to replace the filter as at the correct interval or more frequently under dusty conditions. Replacement filters with an activated carbon core may become available which also remove odours that may occur for instance in heavy traffic. The filter will soon become clogged with flies and leaves etc. The blackening is due to dust and pollen (even smaller than the pores in the filter) that have been attracted to the filter fibres. It is very easy to access this filter so I recommend that you remove and clean the filter at least every 12 months and if it looks clogged, replace it. Procedure 1. Working from the passenger side, empty the glove box and remove the damper from the left hand side; 2. Squeeze the stops at either side of the glove box to allow it to drop down; 3. Drop the glove box to just below level to expose the mounting hinges and pull the glove box back towards the seat in order to detach it. With the glove box removed the white plastic access cover is clearly visible on the heater case. Press the clip on the left side to remove the cover outwards; 4. Withdraw the filter from the heater intake; 5. It can be seen in this photo how much debris has been trapped in 10 months/7500 miles (Note, the cleaner filter in this photo has been fitted for about a month and is already beginning to discolour). As an interim measure it is acceptable to turn the filter upside down and tap out the large objects onto a hard surface and vacuum the fine particles from the dirty side only. Avoid breathing the dust. It is unwise to leave replacement beyond the recommended intervals and essential not to leave the filter out all together. 6. To refit a new filter place it into the heater intake with the "UP" arrow positioned accordingly. Replace the cover, glovebox and glovebox damper.
  39. 1 point
    Note - 4.3 Cabin Filter is shown seperately Difficulty - Easy Time - 5 minutes. Tools - None Frequency - Normal Conditions: 18000 miles or 2 years Dusty conditions: As needed UK Part No and price TBA by Lindop Brothers Toyota in subsequent post. Introduction To improve the environment inside the car, a clean air filter is fitted to the heater intake. This is intended to remove dust and particles that would otherwise enter the car. The filter fitted to the RAV is a particulate filter which has been electrostatically charged to capture the finest particles that are also positive or negatively charged and attracted to the filter. New filters are snow white but soon become blackened by the volume of tiny particles trapped within them. The result as well as a fresher interior is cleaner interior and air vents etc. A filter that is becoming clogged will also starve the interior of fresh air and windows will quickly steam up so it is very important to replace the filter as at the correct interval or more frequently under dusty conditions. Replacement filters with an activated carbon core may become available which also remove odours that may occur for instance in heavy traffic. The filter will soon become clogged with flies and leaves etc. The blackening is due to dust and pollen (even smaller than the pores in the filter) that have been attracted to the filter fibres. It is very easy to access this filter so I recommend that you remove and clean the filter at least every 12 months and if it looks clogged, replace it. Procedure Working from inside the passenger side, empty the glove box and squeeze the two stops to allow the glove box to swing down; You can now see the white plastic cover of the filter housing; Squeeze the plastic retainer.......; .........and withdraw the filter housing; Take a moment to study how the filter is located into the housing. Now push the filter element out of the and re-install the new one. Make sure the filter is correctly located under the retaining lugs; Now slide the housing back until it clicks; Lift the glove box up and push the stops back past the aperture into position and re-load the glove box. Thanks to Wollaston for the use of his 4.2
  40. 1 point
    Difficulty - Easy but fiddly Time - About 10 minutes Tools - None Frequency - As required. They will probably start to degrade and streak by about 6 months and will certainly benefit from being changed by about 10000 miles or 12 months. Price and part Nos to be supplied by Lindop Bros Toyota Thanks to Wollaston for his assistance and the use of his 4.2. Introduction. If your car is fitted with the original Toyota wiper blades it makes good economic sense to change only the rubbers instead of the whole blade. The original blades are very well made. They are powder coated rust resistant steel and you will notice how heavy they are. Just look at these steel pins through the joints; Often, replacement wipers are plastic (even the expensive ones) and after 12 months are starting to wear at these joints. The result is that they will start to flip at each end of the stroke causing a characteristic clunk, clunk during operation. As they continue to wear there is a high risk that the backing spine or pins will contact the glass leaving an arched scratch that will render the windscreen unacceptable for MOT test. To summarise:- If the wipers are the original steel ones replace only the rubbers with genuine Toyota ones. If they have been replaced with plastic replace the whole wiper blade with genuine Toyota ones and then subsequently just the rubbers. If the genuine wipers have been fitted for more than 3 years check them to make sure the pins are not worn and allow the wipers to flop from side to side. Don't run the wipers for long periods on a dry screen as this will cause unnecessary wear of the pins and blade. It will also reduce the life of the wiper motor. Always use the correct screen wash as this will reduce degredation of the rubber, resist freezing and not damage the paintwork. Never ever use anti-freeze as this will damage paintwork. A small amount of washing up liquid is acceptable in summer as this will assist in the rmoval of insects but it will also de-wax the car so avoid using it if you are not regularly polishing. Procedure To remove the blade, lift the arm and squeeze the plastic clip where the fitting attaches to the wiper arm; While squeezing the clip push the blade back toward the windscreen and when it clears the end of the arm then thread it under the hooked arm and clear; CAUTION - THE WIPER ARM IS HEAVILY SPRING LOADED. IT WILL STAY IN THE UP POSITION BUT IF IT FLIRTS BACK IT WILL CRACK THE WINDSCREEN. FOR THIS REASON IT IS WISE TO PUT A FLATTENED CARDBOARD BOX AT THE BOTTOM OF THE WINDSCREEN OR SIMPLY CAREFULLY LOWER THE ARM BACK TO LAY ON THE GLASS. Now take the blade to a suitable work surface. Look how the new wiper is shaped with a groove right at the top for the tension springs and a groove just underneath for the blade hooks. This what I refer to as the anchor end of the blade with a stopped recess; To remove the rubber, grip it at the anchor end shown in the above photos and pull quite hard to force it out of the stopped anchor location; Carefully slide the rubber complete with the stainless steel tension springs out fron all of the arm hooks. Look at the direction it is being withdrawn in relation to the blade fitting above Wollastons thumb; Now remove the tension springs out of the wiper rubber noting that there is a notch in each one designed to engage a matching lug in the rubber; Now carefully engage the tension springs into the new rubber making sure that the notches line up with the lugs and that the springs arch up in the middle so the wipers will be concave; Once the springs are fitted to the rubber you can slide it back one by one through the blade hooks. They are correctly fitted from the bottom of the blade i.e. if you look at the mounting adapter where it hooks onto the wiper arm it is pivoted. Feed the rubber in from the opposite end to the pivot. Make sure the rubber engages every hook of the blade and it will eventually come to the anchor end. At this stage carefully force the rubber just a little bit further until it pops through and locates in the anchor position (as in picture No 4 above). Now refit the complete assembly back onto the arm. If you haven't done this before it can be quite confusing but remember the other one is still fitted for you to look at! Lift the arm off the glass into the upright position. Position the blade under the arm so that the adapter faces the same direction as the hook as in the third photo above. Now lift the adapter so it is slightly inclined and manoeuvre the blade back and under the hook then up and forward to engage the hook. Pull it fully forward until it clicks. Carefully lower the arm onto the screen. It will now be streak and noise free.
  41. 1 point
    Here's the maintenance intervals http://techdoc.toyota-europe.com/Maintenan.../aygo/Final.pdf Here's the service data sheets. Thanks to a kindly fellow at Toyota for the info. You know who you are :) Naturally, if you don't know what your doing don't risk your safety. If you do, it's your own fault
  42. 1 point
    Whilst the MR2 Roadster has very few flaws as either a fun cheap sports car or as a precision tool to hit the track with, there is one thing that we as a Club feel every owner should be aware of, and that is the pre-catalytic converters (or pre-cats for short). There have been a huge amount of questions on here since the forum began regarding these, and this thread is here to hopefully answer any and all questions that have cropped up about the pre-cats, as well as dispel some myths about them. *Please note: The Club neither encourages nor advocates the interference with emissions equipment on any motor vehicle, and we take no responsibility for any action taken by any person as a result of reading this article. All text and pictures here are for information purposes only.* What is a pre-cat? To put it quite simply, the pre-cats sit before the main catalytic converter in the exhaust system and help to keep the harmful emissions as low as possible for a short period after you start the car up. Of course, there is slightly more to it than that… The main catalytic converter in the Mk3 works best at converting the harmful compounds contained within the exhaust gas at high temperatures: However, since the engine takes a while to heat up to it's optimum running temperature, there is a time when a great deal of harmful emissions are allowed to simply pass straight through the cat and are dispersed into the air. Toyota obviously wanted to keep these emissions to an absolute minimum to enable the car to be classed as a ULEV (Ultra Low Emissions Vehicle) to allow the Mk3 to be sold in California (they have practically the most stringent rules on car emissions anywhere in the world there!), so between the engine and main cat they placed two pre-cats contained within the main manifold itself. The manifold itself looks like this: The four headers run into the two chambers containing the pre-cats, and then they're passed onto the main cat to let it do its job. The pre-cats are made from a ceramic material, which whilst excellent at absorbing the noxious gasses at low temperatures, is also highly brittle… Why are we worried about them? As stated above, the pre-cats themselves are not the strongest material known to man, and they have been known to break down and enter the engine, causing serious damage to the internals. When this sort of damage has occurred, you are almost certainly looking at needing a new engine. Woah, wait a minute! How can the pre-cat get back into the engine: Surely the exhaust flow pushes it all out? True to a certain extent, but here's the clever bit… The 1ZZ-FE engine (Toyota's designation for the engine inside the MR2 Roadster) is a very clever piece of kit, and arguably its main party piece is the VVTi, or Variable Valve Timing Intelligent. This increases engine response all over the rev range by altering the timing of the cams, allowing for differing amounts of valve overlap in order to give great low-down torque as well as good top-end power. The 1ZZ also uses it's VVT to perform EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) functions without the aid of a specific valve like other cars. Under certain operating conditions (usually steady cruise) the cams are timed to scavenge some exhaust gas back into the cylinders, as a way of reducing the high hydrocarbon emissions that modern petrol engines generate at certain times. Unfortunately, when you combine this with some very sharp ceramic pre-cat particles, you can imagine what happens: The pre-cats start breaking down, and get dropped into the main cat which then causes excessive pressure, leading to oil blow-by in the engine. When the VVTi kicks in, the pre-cats are sucked back in and scratch and score the cylinder walls, leading to more oil passing by the piston rings and being burnt off without you even realising it. No oil in an engine leads to massive failure as every moving part grinds against metal, and in short you end up with a practically useless engine. When this happens the situation is compounded by the fact that hot oil is now allowed to drip directly onto the pre-cats and break them down even quicker, which in turn allows large chunks to block the main cat even more, which then stops any smaller pre-cat material escaping at all and sucks even more back into the engine to cause even more damage… A vicious circle of the very worst kind. Some common symptoms of pre-cat failure are extreme oil loss, very noticeable lack of power all the way through the rev range, and horrible noises coming from your engine bay. Essentially, if you've got any of these problems and they are directly related to pre-cat loss, then it's too late. Even the oil warning light won't save you here, as by the time it comes on there's almost zero oil left in the engine anyway. For more information on how an engine works in general, please click here for a link to HowStuffWorks.com But I've read elsewhere that the pre-cats themselves are fine, it the piston rings which are the weakness… This is where we come across a real conundrum, and a question to which no-one has a definitive answer. It's true that on very early MK3s there was a known problem with the piston rings themselves on a 1ZZ, and Toyota issued a technical document to the dealers around the world stating as such. They also changed the design of the piston rings for the facelift version of the Roadster, which became available in 2003. Now whether it's a case of the piston rings failing, oil dripping onto the pre-cats and breaking them up, or the pre-cats self destructing and taking the piston rings with them, we just don't know. All we do know for certain is that whilst you can't take the piston rings out of the engine, you can remove the pre-cats from the manifold. No pre-cats = Nothing to get sucked back into the engine. Okay, so the pre-cats are obviously a bad thing, but what can I do about it? Is there any way to tell if they're okay on my car? There is only one sure way of telling, and that it to remove the entire manifold and check both the top and bottoms of the pre-cats for any signs of damage. This is the only 100% way. I'm not very mechanically minded, so is there another way? Even if it's not 100%? Yup, and this is the way 99% of people do it (myself included). It's very simple, and requires nothing more than a 22mm O2 sensor removal socket (Available from here for one, but you can get them at many other places as well, this is just an example), a can of PlusGas or similar penetrating oil (WD40 will do at a push, but it's a lot easier with the PlusGas), and a torch. The picture above shows the heatshield which covers the manifold itself, and is how your car looks when you open the engine bay. Coming out of either side of the heatshield are the O2 sensors, which need to be removed to see the pre-cats from the top only. 1. Get the engine nice and warm first, it'll make this job a lot easier! 2. Spray the PlusGas liberally onto the joint where the O2 sensor meets the manifold. Leave for 10 minutes, then spray it again. You cannot use enough of this stuff, trust me! Don't worry about the steam coming off; it's not doing anything any harm. 3. Being very careful not to burn yourself on the heat shield, use the O2 socket to remove the sensors, Unplug them first from the plastic clip (it's a simple push-tab-and-release connection), and make sure you turn them anti-clockwise. If you have an older vehicle, you may find that these are very stubborn, but do persevere and don't be afraid to give it a little elbow-grease! 4. Pull the sensor out of the socket and place carefully on the floor, away from your feet. You don't really want to tread on it now you've done the hard part, do you?! 5. Take the torch and shine it into the holes. You're looking for a completely solid honeycomb matrix with no cracks or large holes in it, like this: 6. When you've finished checking (and hopefully found that they're still intact), simply screw the O2 sensor back in and nip it up with the socket. Oh, and you may want to plug it back in too. My pre-cats look fine! I'm safe! *dances* Not quite: They're still very fragile, and remember you can't see the bottom of the matrix from that angle either. All this means is that your engine is still fine and you're not in any immediate danger of the pre-cats failing. Oh, okay. So what's the next step then? The only 100% sure way to protect your engine is total removal of the pre-cats from the manifold. This isn't a particularly hard job, but it is more involved than simply removing the sensors. CONTINUED IN THE POST BELOW
  43. 1 point
    I see a number of requests for Engine Codes for the Yaris. Here is the current list from 2003 and the new Mark 2 and 2009 New Yaris. (Updated 17th July 2009) 2003: 1.0 litre VVT-i - 1SZ-FE 1.3 litre VVT-i – 2SZ-FE 1.5 litre VVT-i – 1NZ-FE 1.4 litre D-4D – 1ND-TV 2006: 1.0 litre VVT-i – 1KR-FE 1.3 litre VVT-i – 2SZ-FE 1.8 litre Dual VVT-i – 2ZR-FE 1.4 litre D-4D 90 – 1ND-TV 2009: 1.0 litre VVT-i – 1KR-FE 1.33 litre Dual VVT-i – 1NR-FE 1.4 litre D-4D 90 – 1ND-TV
  44. 1 point
    Generally if one has carpet mats in one's car, the driver's mat tends to have the heaviest wear, and wears out faster than the other three mats. One can now purchase OE single driver's carpet mats for some vehicles, which will save having to buy completely new sets in the above scenario. Available from Parts King, your local Toyota dealer or the Official Toyota Store on Ebay See: http://stores.ebay.co.uk/ToyotaOfficialStore?_fsub=&_nkw=&_nkw=single+car+mat&submit=SEARCH&LH_TitleDesc=1&clk_rvr_id=927410690024&afsrc=1&rmvSB=true
  45. 1 point
    Generally if one has carpet mats in one's car, the driver's mat tends to have the heaviest wear, and wears out faster than the other three mats. One can now purchase OE single driver's carpet mats for some vehicles, which will save having to buy completely new sets in the above scenario. Available from Parts King, your local Toyota dealer or the Official Toyota Store on Ebay See: http://stores.ebay.co.uk/ToyotaOfficialStore?_fsub=&_nkw=&_nkw=single+car+mat&submit=SEARCH&LH_TitleDesc=1&clk_rvr_id=927410690024&afsrc=1&rmvSB=true
  46. 1 point
    How to reset your Auto electric window function. Auhor: GIDDLEPIN If, like me, you let the wife use your beloved Auris to pop down to the post box when the weather's freezing and, if like my wife yours decides to wind the window down to clear the ice off (?????)... and, if like mine, your window is frozen solid and it stops the auto function working and causes the auto light on the switch to flash, here's the procedure to reprogramme the auto wind unit. Simply turn the ignition on, wind the window all the way to the bottom and hold the switch down for at least ten seconds. Then wind it all the way back up again and hold the switch for another ten seconds and voila, the system's reset!
  47. 1 point
    Grey imports brought into the UK do not have their details recorded by Toyota GB, and are not traceable should any recall action be required. The only way for owners of Grey Imports to establish whether their vehicles may be affected by any recall action, is for the owners to contact the Toyota GB Contact Centre directly. Contact details for the Toyota GB Contact Centre are: Telephone - 0344 701 6202 Opening Hours - 8:30am – 6:00pm Monday – Friday, and 9:00am – 1:00pm Saturday The Toyota Contact Centre is able to provide information and support to resolve your query quickly and effectively. Calls to this number cost the same as calling an 01 or 02 number, where calls to 01 or 02 numbers are part of any “inclusive” minutes (on mobile or landline), calls to this number will also be included. Post - Toyota (GB) PLC PO Box 814 Portsmouth PO6 9AY United Kingdom Owners of Grey Imports in other countries should contact their local Toyota Distributor.
  48. 1 point
    Generally if one has carpet mats in one's car, the driver's mat tends to have the heaviest wear, and wears out faster than the other three mats. One can now purchase OE single driver's carpet mats for some vehicles, which will save having to buy completely new sets in the above scenario. Available from Parts King, your local Toyota dealer or the Official Toyota Store on Ebay See: http://stores.ebay.co.uk/ToyotaOfficialStore?_fsub=&_nkw=&_nkw=single+car+mat&submit=SEARCH&LH_TitleDesc=1&clk_rvr_id=927410690024&afsrc=1&rmvSB=true
  49. 1 point
    Toyota RAV4 Electrical Wiring Diagrams (EWD).pdf
  50. 1 point
    I had to fit new drive shaft oil seal. It was impossible to get a drift to fit it within budget so I fabricated one. Steps to action. Bought from BnQ a 78mm hole cutter. With angle cutter removed teeth for a flat surface and smoothed with metal file. This fits snuggly over edge of oil seal and allows it to be drifted into place. Cost £10 and oil seal cost £24.00 Loosen wheel nuts Loosen Hub nut(have new one as its centerpunched in a groove and will need replacing. Jack car up with stands for safety. Remove wheel Shields and engine covers under wheel arch. Remove bottom ball joint bolt and split joint Easy by undoing three bolts on joint carrier on mine and NOT splitting joint itself. With soft mallet knock out drive shaft. Support drive shaft,being careful of rubber gaiters. Lever shaft out with big flat screwdrivers. remove old seal Drive in new one making sure it goes in square. You wont do this without a tool Either like I made or one from dealers. If it twists and jams its a throw away and another 24 pounds. Drive it in flush with surface even all round,. Refit shaft with new circlip on end. Refit Ball joint Refit Hub nut Refit wheel Lower car. Tighten hubnut to 159 ft lbs Stake it with centre punch Tighten wheel nuts to 40 ft lbs On my late model2003 I found it easy to remove bottom ball joint by removing three bolts attatching housin rather tan splitting joint. Job took 30 mins. Easy.



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