gjnorthall

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gjnorthall last won the day on June 9 2019

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About gjnorthall

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  • First Name
    G
  • Contributor
    1
  • Gender*
    Male
  • Toyota Model
    Rav4
  • Toyota Year
    2017
  • Location
    ---------WALES-----------

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  1. Just check that the sway bar (anti roll bar) is fitted correctly - the bar should bend downwards at the ends ie the attachment point for the drop links should be lower than the centreline of the bar. You say that the brake pipe is rubbing the bar - do you possibly mean brake hose?
  2. The colour of the smoke will narrow down possible issues. Is the smoke blue (and often smells "oily"), white or black / dark grey? How many miles on the clock and when was the air filter and fuel filter last replaced?
  3. You don’t mention if the noise improves as the engine warms up. The clue is damp or wet weather which causes auxiliary belts to squeal. If squirting water on to the belt silences it, then a replacement belt is the solution. Once a belt starts to squeal - it’s surface becomes hard and polished so a replacement is the only long term solution.
  4. Warranty claims on DPF’s are difficult. If blockage was due to driving regime then this would not be covered. An unrelated failure which resulted in blockage may well be covered but it’s not straightforward. DPF’s have a finite life - you don’t mention the mileage of the car. I’m not clear as to what the first dealer has attempted to do. They may just have attempted a manual regeneration. There is a need for a systematic approach and the first thing would be to check out the pressure differential measurement to ascertain that the output (which relates to the degree of blockage) is correct. The control software for regeneration would also be checked. Thereafter it’s possible to carry out a controlled forced regeneration. Ultimately it may not be possible to clean the DPF and the unit would need replacement - however there is a comprehensive diagnostic routine that needs to be completed before reaching this conclusion. In some cases it might not be possible to return a DPF to an as-new condition. Hopefully your Toyota dealer will be able to regenerate the unit and it would then be important to understand the root cause of the failure so that action could be taken to minimise the chance of a recurrence. In some situations a DPF equipped car simply isn’t a good choice.
  5. There is a risk when buying an engine of this era that it suffers from the oil burning / head gasket issue. Sometimes problematic engines end up in breakers yards.
  6. Cars which start fine when cold - fail to start when hot but start OK when left for a while often suffer from heat soak of the starter motor. Engine heat causes the starter motor to increase in temperature - this increases the resistance of the windings - the current load increases and the car becomes difficult to start. If the motor is left to cool for a while - the car starts fine. Proprietary heat covers are available but at least one forum member solved the problem by wrapping the body of the starter motor with exhaust heat wrap.
  7. Cars which start fine when cold - fail to start when hot but start OK when left for a while often suffer from heat soak of the starter motor. Engine heat causes the starter motor to increase in temperature - this increases the resistance of the windings - the current load increases and the car becomes difficult to start. If the motor is left to cool for a while - the car starts fine. Proprietary heat covers are available but at least one forum member solved the problem by wrapping the body of the starter motor with exhaust heat wrap.
  8. When the clutch is pressed and the car is in gear (car stationary or moving slowly) the clutch friction plate is stationary or rotating very slowly whilst the flywheel and pressure plate are rotating at engine speed.There is no torsional force on the DMF or friction plate so the springs within these units can rattle - it’s quite common. As the clutch is released - the springs are compressed so the rattling stops. I wouldn’t be too concerned if the noise remains consistent.
  9. I infact read the full thread and I'm responding to the general issue of erroneously putting petrol in a diesel tank. A couple of posters were concerned about the after effects of petrol contamination.
  10. Years ago drivers would add a little petrol to a tank of diesel to minimise waxing in cold weather! However this would be ill advised on modern diesels. Diesel lubricates the fuel pump and injector shuttles and the solvent action of petrol reduces lubrication. The fuel pump is easily damaged without lubrication and shards of metal will be dispersed through the system. It's reckoned that putting up to 5% petrol into diesel won't usually do long term harm. Therefore if you realise when you've dispensed a couple of litres of petrol - you might be able to save the day by then brimming the tank with diesel. If you've actually filled up with petrol, then there's no option but to drain - both switching on the ignition (if there is a primary pump) or starting the engine will cause fairly rapid damage. Unfortunately many drivers don't realise their mistake until the car subsequently grinds to a halt. Fuel companies don't help prevent errors - diesel and petrol nozzles are often in a mixed array on the pump.
  11. Yes standing facing the front of the car - front right hand side. I wouldn't be overly concerned - all the gaskets I've seen have been 3 notches or less and I've always gone for the maximum thickness (there's only 0.05 mm between each thickness).
  12. You can see a rectangular cutout on the lip of the block on the drawing. Unfortunately the head overlaps the cutout so it's difficult to see the gasket. You can count the notches using a thin screwdriver or push a piece of plasticine with a coating of oil into the recess so that you get an impression of the gasket edge. Any good garage should be able to do the work and you can save 50% on parts cost by using good branded parts such as head bolts. The gasket however needs to be genuine Toyota. The relevant sections of the Toyota workshop manual can be downloaded for a couple of pounds and this will help with the correct torques etc. The most important thing is to minimise the amount of metal skimmed off the head. You'll find what looks to be aluminium foil (part of the head gasket) embedded on the surface of the head and the key thing is to skim the head so that this is removed and the cutter has touched all parts of the head. Machining also gives the correct surface finish for optimum gasket seal. Usually around 7 thou is sufficient to ensure that the head is flat and unmarked.
  13. You won't see mayonaise or a leak into the exhaust gases - the usual failure is between a cylinder and a waterway so gases from a cylinder pressurise the cooling system and coolant is expelled from the expansion bottle - there isn't a path between coolant and lubrication system. Toyota's cutoff on oil consumption was 0.5 litre or more in 620 miles. This is far higher than experienced on the majority of Rav's of this generation but can be used as a yardstick as you monitor oil consumption. Hopefully oil consumption will be OK in which case only work on the head will be required. This can be done without engine removal - albeit with some difficulty! The photo shows a failed gasket in situ. You can see the thickness guide bottom right. This gasket is a No3 - it has three grooves and was eventually replaced with a No5 gasket.
  14. The description in your previous post also suggests turbo seal failure. It may be that the turbo is life expired but often turbo seals fail for other reasons. As part of any turbo work, it's important to check that the oil return from the turbo is clear - any restriction will pressurise the turbo seals and cause oil to leak into the exhaust. The oil feed pipe should also be checked for restriction and preferably replaced. Air filter must be in good condition and check that none of the hoses on the induction system are collapsed or kinked. Beware of very cheap new turbos on offer - some Chinese units are of dubious quality. In the past I've been very happy with reconditioned turbos from Turbo Active (sold on an exchange basis). There are obviously many other reputable turbo companies in the UK. It's also possible to fit a new cartridge into the old turbo but given the age and mileage - there may be other damage to the turbo.
  15. This engine doesn't have a PCV valve - it's just a vent pipe that connects between the rocker box and inlet manifold system. In the first instance confirm that the crankcase is running under vacuum by running the engine without the filler cap and the opening covered with a cloth - you should be able to feel if the crankcase is pressurised or under vacuum. Does the exhaust blow out a lot of smoke when accelerating after a period of overrun?