wass

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wass last won the day on December 29 2018

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About wass

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  • First Name
    Geof
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    Male
  • Toyota Model
    prius t spirit c/w leather seats
  • Toyota Year
    2011
  • Location
    Cambridgeshire
  • Interests
    Classic Cars
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  1. wass

    MPG issue after service and tyre change.

    The universal answer to everything, good or bad! 🙂
  2. wass

    TPMS on PHV

    Its rather like when you've just washed the car, it starts to rain---when motorcycling , the only time it rains is when you went out without your waterproofs and when you fit winter tyres, the weather stays mild.
  3. wass

    MPG issue after service and tyre change.

    I found this 5w30 trick was happening on every service. So much that I would deliberately travel around 200 or so miles after the (dis) service and then change the oil for the correct grade in order to get the car running on the right specification of oil. There's nothing you can do about it . If you change your own oil and cancel the service regime you commit the mortal sin of not having a FSH.Its a no win situation which i have been at a loss to fathom. One has to pay for a clever ***** to service the car with the wrong oil and then stamp the service book and then one has to carry out the service oneself in order to ensure everything is done properly.I once refuse to buy a 2nd hand car on the grounds that it had a FSH completed by a certain dealership. The salesperson even offered sizeable discounts however, I knew most of the guys who would have been "completing" the "service".This was a certain Jaguar dealership.
  4. The fact that they do not appear to be encouraging all electric vehicles all that much could indicate that we are getting preached to from the gospel according to London again. IE public transport although not terrorist proof is statistically, fairly good (sometimes) in London during business hours , where the law makers live. Most rural areas( where not all that many voters live) have little or no public transport so it isn't an option.
  5. wass

    Should I buy a plug in?

    Should I buy a plug in? Hmm. In the cold light of day, a plug in costs about £7000 more than a non plug in prius. So how far will you have to drive before you've made up the difference? Well, just to make things really simple lets assume that you never ever buy petrol for the PHEV and all of your journeys are made using electricity which you've nicked by plugging your car into a street lamp. If petrol costs 1.28 per litre and you get 60mpg out of your usual prius, your £7000 buys 1203 gallons of petrol which will get you 72000 miles down the road. Just looking at these very simplified figures, PHEV doesn't make sense yet. Petrol needs to get a lot more expensive and electricity needs to get a lot cheaper, also car owners need to hang onto their cars for longer and drive more shorter journeys with 1 1/2hr intervals between journeys ( for recharging). So for the sake of payback, I dont think the PHEV is viable. For the sake of saving the planet, the PHEV actually consumes more of the earths resources in order to manufacture it. Charging up the PHEV consumes still more of the earths resources and installing the infrastructure to allow charging to occur in more locations entails consuming more of earths resources. In the meantime the conventional hybrid will continue to use earths resources and will continue to do so.My guess is that PHEVs need to catch on in a big way to acheive the potential of reducing the overall use of resources.
  6. wass

    MPG issue after service and tyre change.

    Its a common trick for garages to re-fill with the cheaper oil. As everyone says: 0w20 is the right oil but would you believe it? most garages dont stock it! I once challenged the garage which refilled my car with the recommended alternative and was told they had refilled the vehicle with the recommended oil although when pressed, they declined to tell me what grade that oil was. I started to buy my own oil and use the stuff they fitted during the service as a flushing oil. I would drain it off after 200 miles and reinstate my fuel consumption by refilling with 0w20. I suppose I could've saved myself some time by giving my oil to the garage to refill for themselves ,however , having been seen off by their shoddy tricks once, I thought it better to personally see to it that the right oil went in. Oh the things we do to get those official stamps in the book eh?FSH means so much to most people and yet means nothing at all to me
  7. wass

    Cross climate tyres for Prius Gen4

    The whole tyre discussion is littered with hopeful misunderstanding. The most grippy winter tyres are going to be more draggy and less economical. The wider the tyre, the more drag it will create. Narrow eco tyres will return good fuel consumption but one must take care in wet or frosty weather. However, I successfully drove a morris traveler rear wheel drive on 145x14 tyres through snow up the the hubs ( 6 or7" deep) not because the tyres were all weather or studded but simply because there was good tread on them, they were slightly over inflated and they were narrow and displaced the snow and slush more easily than wider tyres. So .... buy cars with narrow tyres, make sure your pressures are ok and forget about all weather tyres in UK, they are a gimmick, they doubtless do work but in the most part , are surplus to requirements because narrower tyres would probably do just a good a job. Toyota spend millions on developing fuel efficient cars and then we, the punters, spend millions on the cars kick economy gains into touch by fitting high drag wide wheels and tyres. How daft is that? Do I want to fit 17" wheels on my car? Not when I can fit smaller wheels and it costs less and grips better in challenging road conditions.
  8. wass

    Road traffic incident

    Not when the press get their teeth into it. Journo propaganda wins or loses votes.
  9. wass

    Road traffic incident

    It really is a sad state of affair when common sense has taken second place to economics. The police weren't able to respond due to lack of resource. Lack of resource due to lack of budget, Lack of budget due to budget cut. Budget cut due to politician hankering after re-election. News papers/ journalists have their place. Adverse publicity persuades politician hankering after re-election to see common sense and forces politician to stop their easy fix budget cuts in favour of actually doing the country some good. So we see lumps of wood falling off lorries and police unable to respond in the manner they would like to.... we have a chat with a journalist. There's nothing quite so daunting as the phrase "questions will be asked in the house". It shouldn't have to work that way but unfortunately , it does.
  10. wass

    And it's Goodbye from me

    Like some others on this forum, I am not entirely convinced that Toyota is so far behind everyone with EV tech. Their hybrid program has included nearly all if not all technologies require to build a totally electrical car. They have one of the most slippery bodyshells on the current prius and this includes quite wide tyres and a radiator grille-( both items known to cause drag). They have electrical motors able to power the car along, they have kinetic battery recharging technology, electrical power control technology, charging technology and battery technology and mass production experience. Putting a Toyota next to any one of its EV competitors highlights their competitors weakness. Nissan , for example are only successful with small cars with big batteries. Tesla have cracked the range, power and battery issue but the cost of the tech is astronomical.Renault have fallen rather short of the mark made by Nissan but have also gone along the route of putting big batteries into a small car. Nearly everyone else is trying to use their petrol engined chassis as a lack lustre EV or hybrid. Only BMW have really had a good go at things but their very space efficient I3 is a bit of a draggy little lump at cd 0.29. My impression is that for the time being , Toyota are keeping their powder dry whilst battery and motor technology slowly improves to the point where producing a vehicle which will carry 4 persons and their baggage 300miles between fuel ups ( charges ) is commonplace and affordable.
  11. It will be interesting to see how Toyota who have amassed a lot of expertise and experience with petrol electric vehicles use this to develop electric only vehicles. I suspect that Toyota will be market leaders once electric only vehicles become the norm. Batteries replace fuel tanks. Motors, drive trains, control and charging systems, ancillaries, are already well up the development ladder. I would imagine that a fair amount of Toyota weight saving tech will be brought into play too. I have seen very little of superconductor or fuel cell technology being utilised as yet but I can imagine that it will be called upon in the not too distant future. The future is bright , the future is techy!
  12. wass

    Hell Is Buying a Used Toyota...

    So do I , this is probably why they spray cars in dishwasher white.
  13. wass

    Hell Is Buying a Used Toyota...

    What a brilliant write up! This is the sort of thing which should be turning up in the motoring press. Sad that most journos are there for the junket and are journos because they got a GCSE in English but don't actually know anything about the motor industry.
  14. wass

    Gen 3 AC issue

    From what you describe, your car air conditioning was re-gassed illegally ( european F gas regulations), ie. gas added to a system without finding and repairing the source of the leak.
  15. wass

    Gen 4 Air Conditioning

    Car air conditioning never ceases to amuse. Refrigeration technicians are highly,trained, skilled, knowledgeable and qualified. Qualifications are gained over a period of approximately 3 years minimum. Knowledge takes a while longer to accumulate. Garages in the most part, cant afford to employ air conditioning technicians. So to put it simply, why don't you ask the bloke next door if he wouldnt mind asking his youngest to wipe a cloth over the vents and give the ac a once over? Change the pollen filter, clean out the vents, run the unit on recirc only for the shortest possible periods and once or twice a year scald the entire system with air which is hotter than 60 degrees for about 15 minutes. EASY to do on a hot summers day with the ac turned onto maximum heat medium fan speed on a long run during which the engine is at its full working temperature. (Motorways are good for this.)Dont forget to wind the windows down so that the heat escapes and the system carries on trying to throw heat through the ductwork and coils. You then ensure that you kill the bacteria which makes everything stink. Keep the drain clean and clear, blow out the coil and kill bacteria by temperature and not disinfectant. Adding, topping up or routinely replacing refrigerant isnt necessary. Changing refrigerant is only necessary when there has been a leak. All refrigerant leaks have to be degassed, repaired and proven prior to reintroducing refrigerant. Most refrigerant leaks are very hard to detect. They do sell dyes which glow under an ultraviolet lamp however, what they don't tell you is that these dyes will only work if the leak is big enough to let the ultraviolet sensitive element of the dye to escape ; in many cases the molecular size of the escaping gas component is smaller than the dye molecule size and so the gas escapes whilst the dye doesn't. It makes everyone think that the problem went away until the ac stops cooling again. And guess what! you didn't just pay a semiskilled, barely trained, charlatan £165 to be fed a line or two. Recent developments show the motor industry trying to protect its own by introducing "special" refrigerants so that you have to entrust your vehicle to someone who just got back from a fortnights course. Sorry to say, this doesn't make them right ; a properly trained refrigeration technician knows how to handle and is qualified to manage any type of refrigerant from propane to carbon dioxide to ammonia ( I kid you not) and many , many more. A lot of people refer to air conditioning as "air con" some of them think they are being a bit savvy, Nicholas Cage fans and err ...cool. However I think that they are unwittingly being extremely accurate; a lot of the air conditioning trade is "air CON"