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Nigel Cox

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  • First Name
    Nigel
  • Toyota Model
    Yaris 1.3
  • Toyota Year
    2005
  • Location
    Buckinghamshire

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  1. Stepdaughter just got a 2005 Yaris. The radio display shows almost nothing, the LCD display is dead. The CD player gives an awful sound too, although the sound from the radio is fine, suggesting the CD unit is dead too. Are these units paired to each other, or coded to the car, or will any replacement from Ebay go straight in without squabbling? Thanks
  2. I need an ABS wheel sensor for the RH Front of my Camry. It is a 1990 V6, VZV21, but I believe these to be the same on all the 88-91 Camrys with ABS fitted. (2.0 SV21 and 2.5 V6 VZV21) The sensor is the same both sides, but the wiring has several brackets attached which are handed, so the RH one is best. The LH rear has also been condemned, but I think it is ok. Although if one is available I'll take that too. Once disconnected, an ohm meter gives a reading of about 1400 ohms on the known good ones on my car, so this should be a good test. If still n the car, the connector is above the wheelarch liner under the wing. These can be very difficult to remove. I will take the whole hub assembly if necessary, (at the appropriate cost), rather than risk breaking the sensor. Please email me if you can help. nigel_cox@unipart.co.uk or nigelcox@tesco.net Will pay any reasonable price.
  3. Did the above advice work for you? If this is a 91- Camry, then the advice is good. If yours is the 87-91 model (SV21/VZV21) then you need different advice. I have recently swapped the head unit on Father-in-law's 90 Camry, so can give a full story if required.
  4. Thanks for your reply. Anyone else out there who can help?
  5. Hopefully you got the dash out ok. I now have a problem, which you may be able to help with. I need the RH Front ABS sensor for a 1990 Camry, which if your breaker had ABS, you will have. If you have one, are you willing to part with it? This is mounted at the inner side of the front hub, fixed by one bolt, then the long cable is attached by several bolts until it disappears behind the wheelarch liner. Behind the wheelarch liner is the connector. If you have one, and are willing to part with it, please email me direct, nigel_cox@unipart.co.uk or nigelcox@tesco.net Hopefully we can agree terms. It will need sending to the UK. Regards Nigel
  6. I need an ABS wheel sensor for the RH Front of my Camry. It is a 1990 V6, VZV21, but I believe these to be the same on all the 88-91 Camrys with ABS fitted. (2.0 SV21 and 2.5 V6 VZV21) The sensor is the same both sides, but the wiring has several brackets attached which are handed, so the RH one is best. The LH rear has also been condemned, but I think it is ok. Although if one is available I'll take that too. Once disconnected, an ohm meter gives a reading of about 1400 ohms on the known good ones on my car, so this should be a good test. If still n the car, the connector is above the wheelarch liner under the wing. Please email me if you can help. nigel_cox@unipart.co.uk or nigelcox@tesco.net Will pay any reasonable price.
  7. Had a similar problem on father-in-law's 1990 Camry. Both left speakers failed, probably due to amp overpowering them. Then amp started to take 5 minutes to warm up. His Toyota dealer then broke the head unit and replaced it with a second-hand identical unit. This was impossible to use as the LCD display was visible only from the passenger seat. This car has 4 15w speakers, so an amp is hardly necessary. We fixed this by replacing the head unit with my displaced Panasonic radio/cassette. 4x 25w output, so adequate without an amp. We then laid new speaker wires direct from the head unit to the speakers, by-passing the amp. Result - all the noise he ever needs. My advice, new head unit, junk the amp.
  8. Sounds like the 'overrun fuel cut-off'. A standard feature on most cars since the mid eighties. The principle is that when you let go of the throttle, like slowing for a queue or junction, or going downhill, you rely on some engine braking. The engine is not needed to drive the car, so any fuel used is wasted. As a fuel saving idea, generated by fuel shortages and high prices, vehicle manufacturers hit upon the idea of cutting the fuel in these circumstances. There will be a switch activated when the throttle is fully released. this can be a simple switch at the pedal, or integrated into the throttle potentiometer (position sensor) on some carbs and most injection systems. There will also be a fuel cut off valve on carb models. When the throttle is fully released and the engine speed is above a threshold, usually 1000-1200 rpm, the fuel supply will be pulsed off and on, usually at half-second intervals for up to about 30 seconds. In most circumstances you don't feel this, as the car is still pushing the engine, but if it is out of gear you may notice the revs falling and rising. It is worse when out of gear, as the lack of fuel tries to stall the engine. As the revs fall below the idling speed, the control will reinstate the fuelling, which causes the revs to rise again. on carb models this is achieved by a fuel cut-off valve on the carb, injection models just don't open the injectors. How smooth any vehicle is depends on the original design and application. Some are better than others. The above applies to any car of any make since the mid eighties. You have to live with this as trying to by-pass it will confuse the control unit and upset the idle control.
  9. I don't think you can get it out in one piece, but the biggest part will be one piece. Start with the lower panels in front of your knees, the screws are obvious once you are on the floor looking at it at eye level. The driver's side has a hidden clip to the steering column, but this is easy to reach. Don't just pull until it breaks. The passenger side needs the glovebox released first. Open it and the securing screws are obvious. Once these are off, it all looks fairly simple. That's as far as I'd got, but get that far and just look. they seem to be simple, which is the Japanese way.
  10. Easiest solution is to get an adaptor lead. this plugs into the car original connectors and has standard ISO connectors on the other end to fit direct to your new head unit. Follow this link to the Autoleads web site: http://www.autoleads.co.uk/product/more_in...t=false&id=2664 Should be available in halfords or any car audio shop. (Sadly this didn't work on a 1990 Camry, but I just fed new speaker wires right through to all four speakers, ignoring the vehicles own wiring. Takes a little more work!)
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