Jump to content
Do Not Sell My Personal Information


Dancing Badger

Registered Member
  • Posts

    65
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    6

Dancing Badger last won the day on March 9 2021

Dancing Badger had the most liked content!

Profile Information

  • First Name
    Mick
  • Gender*
    Male
  • Toyota Model
    Prius Business Edition Plus
  • Toyota Year
    2016
  • Location
    Greater Manchester
  • Interests
    General Automotive

Recent Profile Visitors

2,540 profile views

Dancing Badger's Achievements

Enthusiast

Enthusiast (6/14)

  • Reacting Well Rare
  • Dedicated Rare
  • Conversation Starter
  • Week One Done
  • One Month Later

Recent Badges

65

Reputation

  1. I have concerns about E10 - but only because I have a classic car, a 1961 Hillman Minx and it decidedly isn't compatible with E10. The Prius is designed to be compatible with E10. Toyota's biggest market for the Prius is the USA, where they've had E10 for years. Also they've had it in Europe for some years - pre Covid I drove around 2500 - 3000 miles a year in Europe (and 12000 or so in the UK), in my Prius and before that in my Auris hybrid and gen 3 Prius, I just fill up with regular unleaded, whatever is available, never noticed any difference. I see no point whatsoever in having an economical hybrid car and spending an extra five or ten quid a tank on petrol which is intended for high performance cars and isn't actually required for mine - any performance or economy enhancement derived from using super grade petrol won't come near compensating for the additional cost. The other issue is that not all filling stations have the super grade on their forecourt. And this IS an issue for me - I wouldn't mind so much paying the extra for super grade for my Minx as I do less than 1000 miles a year in it so it's not going to be that much of an additional cost, but as my two nearest filling stations don't have super unleaded I did the research. I have changed my lead replacement additive for one with corrosion inhibitors intended to protect against the effects of E10 (and chosen one endorsed by the Federation of Historic British Vehicle Clubs who confirm that it does what it says it does) and last Sunday I changed the diaphragm and valves in my petrol pump as they were rubber, I've replaced them with new parts made out of an E10 resistant plastic. And here's the thing about seals and gaskets - E10 can cause damage to certain flexible components used in some cars, but there are alternative materials which are resistant to the tendency of ethanol to diffuse into their structure causing swelling and subsequent shrinkage, and these are what are used in E10 compatible cars. In case anybody is wondering the additive I have is not compatible with our hybrids - it can't be used with catalytic convertors, although there are additives which can be. I have no concerns about E10 in my Prius.
  2. When I took my gen 3 Prius to the continent I emailed Toyota to ask this question, I can't remember the exact words of their reply but it wasn't helpful. I checked the pattern of the headlights on my garage door and it was flat topped, but slightly higher on the left. In the end I decided that even if the headlights didn't technically need deflectors the Gendarmerie or whoever may not be aware of that and opted to play safe and put them on anyway. I continued to do this with my Auris and my gen 4 Prius (although I'm pretty sure the gen 4 doesn't need them) - I toured the continent every summer for the last 4 or 5 years and drove to several overseas football matches until Covid put a stop to that and I always put the deflectors on - it doesn't cost much, it's easy to do, it doesn't significantly degrade night vision and it avoids any unpleasantness with the authorities. On another note priorité a droite IS still a thing in France, particularly in rural areas, although it's not as widespread as it was in the past. If you see a yellow diamond with a black stripe through that means you do not have priority and must give way to traffic joining from the right, even from what appear to be minor roads. Similarly if on approach to crossroads you see a sign which looks like a black X in a red triangle you must give way to traffic from the right. You need to particularly watch this if you're out in the sticks where people will still drive out of side roads without looking, especially on rural roads where there may be no signs at all. Also in central Paris, there are roundabouts where traffic on the roundabout (carousel) has to give way to traffic joining - best advice is just to be cautious at roundabouts, better to get hooted for being slow than to get into a bump. If roundabouts are signed on approach with give way signs or road markings (often with the words, "vous n'avez pas le priorité") on approach then they work as they do here. If you see a sign with a yellow diamond on a white background then priorité a droite is suspended until such time as you see the diamond with a line through it. If you're intending to drive in Paris you need a clean air certificate which you can get off the French government here - https://www.certificat-air.gouv.fr/en/demande - the website is in English and the sticker is only 3 or 4 euros. Make sure you use the official government site, there are scams where they charge you additional fees. They can impose emergency clean air zones in quite a number of urban areas and you can be fined if you don't have the sticker in your windscreen when the emergency zone applies. Hybrids get a Crit'Air 1 sticker (it goes up to 5 depending on Euro Emissions ratings) and that will get you everywhere. You'll need a scan of your log book to upload. It tells you to put it on the right hand side of your windscreen but I emailed them and they told me that I can put it on the left on a RHD car. I also carry reflective vests (two, for me and She Who Must Be Obeyed), a first aid kit, breathalysers, a warning triangle and some spare bulbs - and now you need a GB sticker too. Also if you have radar warnings on your satnav you have to turn them off in France where it's illegal (although some satnavs warn of danger zones in the general area of a camera, this is allowed) and if you intend to go into Luxembourg you need to take your dashcam off, they're illegal there, as they are in Portugal and Austria.
  3. Can only share my own anecdotal experience, but I had a 2009 Gen 3, one of the first ones. Had about 11,000 miles when I bought it, around 80,000 when I traded it in. It never used a drop of oil, and to my recollection the only fault it ever had was a sticking rear brake calliper. I followed the Prius with a 2013 Auris hybrid which I understand has the same engine, all that had in 4 years was a ball joint replacement. Always had them both dealer serviced on schedule. So based on my experience I'd say that a low mileage Gen 3 is a pretty safe buy. Safe enough that I then bought a Gen 4 which I still have, and my sister is taking delivery of her 18 plate Yaris hybrid today on my recommendation.
  4. https://photos.app.goo.gl/N3UcYpX8ZRZf6eWXA For some reason I can't upload this photo, but see the link. I have used this for years, has a sticky base but doesn't leave a mark on the dash. In this position the phone does not obscure any of the windows, it is in line with the windscreen pillar. It's easy to run a lead from the power socket by tucking and hiding it behind the centre console/dash. A tenner on Amazon. It holds nice and firmly, no wobble even on poorly paved surfaces. I like to take it off, give the gel pad a rinse to refresh it and reattach it once a year or so. https://www.amazon.co.uk/ARTECK-Universal-Rotation-Windshield-Smartphone-Black/dp/B01F3M5EAU
  5. Season 1, Episode 5 - at last, the season finale! 😀👏 The call came this afternoon - "your car is ready!" I've been to collect it, they've filled it with petrol and cleaned it inside and out, and it is now sporting a little led inside, a plate underneath and a couple of new window labels announcing it has a catloc to hopefully deter any tealeaves. Apparently the new alarm is very loud, but I hope never to hear it.And I've registered the new catloc - it's not an insurance scheme, but they've security marked the cat so I have registered that. I enjoyed my drive home and I'm glad to have my own car back. I'm just looking forward, as I'm sure we all are, to being able to take it out for a drive for pleasure. 👍
  6. Season 1, episode 4 It's not ready. The parts haven't come. They're going to fill my petrol tank up by way of apology (it had about a quarter of a tank) and hopefully it will be ready tomorrow. I'm beginning to wonder if I'll ever see that car again....
  7. And I welcome you to season 1, episode 3 of the saga of my catloc! I got a call today from the Aftersales Manager at the dealer. She told me that she's been fully briefed on what has been going on with my car (should have referred her to this forum!) Apparently they've removed the catloc and ordered a new fitting kit as when they fitted it first time it wasn't "guided in correctly" (this sounds like made up technobabble for they didn't fit it properly and wondered what all those leftover bits were for). She was very grateful for my patience, she is personally overseeing the job now and the workshop foreman is personally supervising the work and can she leave me with in the courtesy car until tomorrow. To be honest I'm fine with that, we're in lockdown, I'm working from home and there's nowhere I can go - the car hasn't moved since I got home on Friday. And I'd rather they took it off and started afresh with new fittings rather than try and bodge it. So I've not been grumpy with them - I have the loaner if I need it and their communication at least has been good (a lot better than their quality control) - I'm just surprised that it has turned into such a saga. I'm hoping that we can have the series finale tomorrow and I'll get my car back - but who knows? It's all been excitingly unpredictable so far.
  8. I'm not the best person to answer this in any detail, it's just a superficial impression based on brief experience of loan cars, and I'm always comparing with my Prius. I certainly haven't experienced the issues on your list. However, when I had the previous model I was conscious that it felt a bit noisy and sluggish compared with mine. I particularly noticed that it seemed to rev quite high, and that the engine seemed to run a lot more than mine does in the Prius. The new one seems to spend more time on electric (I always leave them on normal or eco, I don't use EV or power mode and I don't try to force it) and when the engine does run it doesn't seem to rev as high - it makes a big difference to the feel of the car. It seems very responsive as well, which wasn't how the old one felt to me. I can't really give you any more detail than that because I haven't spent long enough behind the wheel of either to do more than gain an impression - but if you were thinking of replacing yours at some stage it's certainly worth a look and an extended test drive to see if they've done anything about the issues you've identified on your current car.
  9. Indeed they are, I was impressed, a big improvement on the previous model.
  10. To continue the story of my Gen 4 and its catloc and tilt sensor - this is turning into a saga, so if you don't feel like reading War and Peace here's the short version - I went to pick the car up and they'd made a hash of fitting the catloc. For those of you who have half an hour to spare, here's the full story - there's a bonus car review at the end! I phoned the dealer today to see how they were getting on. "It's just being washed, Mr Badger," they said, "it'll be ready shortly." So I made my way back to pick it up and asked what the problem had been. The explanation was as follows - this is the first catloc or tilt sensor they've fitted to a Gen 4 Prius - they've done several Aurises and they are easy, but apparently this wasn't. Their initial issue was feeding the wiring through the bulkhead - it has to go through the existing rubber sleeve which contains the main loom, and there isn't really room for the several wires that have to be fed through; and the difficulty of this is compounded by the fact that you can't really see what you're doing because of where it is. In attempting to do this they managed to damage one of the existing wires and had to replace it - they've assured me that it's all been sorted and there are no faults found. The chap then went on to explain that they then struggled with actually wiring it - he reiterated that they haven't done one before and added that the instructions which they downloaded from Toyota were not at all clear. I've seen the instructions for the Auris (I think somebody here linked it, or it could have been PriusChat) and they did indeed look pretty vague - diagrams which don't make it at all obvious what goes where. I think somebody described it as being like the ones from Ikea, although I'd argue that Ikea ones are clearer. I've built flatpack, and I've fitted alarms, so I feel qualified to comment! 😉 Given that the work is taking place up in the dark recesses under the dash I do have some sympathy with this. When I was 18 I bought a second hand kit car, a Rochdale Olympic (I'm not making this up, Google it). It had a panel in the middle of the dash with seventeen switches on it which said interesting things like "heater" and "rear fan" (I never found out where the rear fan was or what it was supposed to do) that didn't do anything when I switched them on. I removed the panel to discover that the bloke who'd built the car had clearly bought a catering size pack of yellow wire - every single wire was yellow. And because the car was fibreglass, every circuit was earthed back to the fusebox rather than the body. Or the battery. Or another circuit. Or not at all, which was an issue. So that was fun. Look, I was 18, I was naïve, but I learnt a lot about automotive electrics from that car. Anyway, I digress. "Next time we do one," he said, "it'll go much faster." Not sure that was very comforting, having been the guinea pig, but I expect he's right. He said Toyota allow 1.6 hours for the job so it's obviously not meant to be such a challenge. Ok then, so that's all sorted then, he's explained what went wrong, but it's all done now, job's a good 'un, I'll be on my way. Err, that'd be a no.😒 He led me out to the car, explained how to turn the sensor off for when it's being legitimately worked on and also how to reset it if it goes off, explained I need to register the catloc as they can't due to data protection laws - this evidently provides insurance, I didn't know that. But I don't know the details, I didn't read the leaflet which is still in the car which (spoiler alert) is still at the dealer's. He apologised again for the job taking so long and we said goodbye. And I started the car, the ICE came on as the traction battery was down to 2 bars - and what a racket! There was a loud vibration that I could feel through the floor. So I trudged back in and told him. Back into the workshop it went, and I sat in the waiting area where I couldn't have a brew because of Covid and entertained myself playing a game on my phone. Quarter of an hour later, my guy was back. He gave me a not very clear explanation of how the catloc is fitted, and said that there are two plates which should be flush together but there was a tiny gap so they were going to drill it, bolt the plates together tightly and shear the bolt head off (this sounds slightly alarming if I'm honest, it's presumably not designed like that) and everything would be hunky dory, trust me, I know a technician. I resumed my game. Quarter of an hour later, my guy was back. Actually it wasn't just the two plates, the catloc plate was touching the exhaust (or the cat itself, he wasn't clear). So they'd have to take it back off, and either adjust the exhaust or adjust the plate. I didn't like the sound of that at all. "Hang on," I said, "don't go adjusting the car to fit the catloc - adjust the catloc to fit the car!" He agreed with that (I wasn't asking). He said they've got a couple of guys in tomorrow morning or maybe they'd leave it till Monday and get the workshop supervisor to do it. I said I'd wait till Monday. And before picking it up I shall be asking them to thoroughly road test it to make sure nothing fouls as they clearly didn't test it today - as soon as the ICE started it was obviously not right. Oh and they didn't do the recall that they were going to (something to do with a seat belt) as they didn't have the parts. But they have (I think, I didn't actually check this, but surely...) successfully replaced the rear wiper blade. "We've not done very well with this one, have we?" he said to me as I left. He was very apologetic. I've used this dealer for years and they've generally been pretty good, but they dropped the ball this time. I'd have been very frustrated if I'd had anywhere to go, but although I haven't really been inconvenienced that much I'm not feeling very confident in this job which I had thought was pretty straightforward. A post script some of you may find interesting - instead of giving me the Aygo back, he loaned me a Yaris hybrid, one of the new models. I liked it a lot on my brief drive home, although the Yaris is a bit small for me. The engine barely runs around town and when it does it's nice and quiet - apparently it's a 1.5l three pot version of the 2.0l Corolla engine so it has a bit of a beat to it, but it sounds quite nice. I found the old model seemed to rev a lot compared to my Prius, I didn't feel that way about this one. It feels quite lively to drive. Rides fairly smoothly, and I liked the styling inside and out - the interior is a bit dark but quite funky - a digital display in front of the driver and a big central screen. It was showing 50.5 mpg on the display but it's only done 217 miles and I've only done 5 of them. Still, for those of you who might consider a Yaris it's definitely worth a look - it felt, looked and drove better than the previous model which I drove last year. Hopefully I'll be able to check back in here on Monday afternoon to announce that everything is tickety boo with my Prius but I'm not counting my chickens until they've hatched, grown up, been killed and plucked, coated in breadcrumbs and the Colonel's 11 secret herbs and spices, deep fried and served in a cardboard bucket with fries and a side of gravy and a refreshing lemon-scented towelette. Phew, that was a long post. I don't post often (stop cheering!) but when I do I make up for lost time.
  11. Toyota say that newer models (including the gen 4, presumably) use less precious metal in the cat so are hopefully less of a target for thieves. My initial thought was that the thieves may well not be aware of that but I suppose the thieves know their own market so perhaps it will help. Then a couple of weeks ago I read this on my local Facebook page, "Warning to all Prius drivers - just had my catalytic converter stolen whilst parked for less than 10 minutes at ASDA. Broad daylight, very busy, £1000+ to repair..." It doesn't say what model Prius it was, but this was at my local Asda, which gave me the willies. So I promptly booked my gen 4 into the dealer for a catloc and a tilt sensor. No guarantees, but it's worth having a deterrent - I like my car and I intend keeping it for a while. It turns out that it's not quite that simple. The dealer has had it for two days now, I'm hoping to get it back tomorrow. It was supposed to be in for one day. Apparently they're having problems with the wiring for the tilt sensor. I can't understand what problems they could be having with the wiring for a Toyota accessory on a stock Toyota that takes them more than two working days to resolve. The dealer initially said yesterday that there was a wire that was "split" and needed replacing, and then when they rang me earlier to say it may still not be finished today the further explanation was that it was a difficult job as the wiring goes through the bulkhead and has numerous connections into the existing wiring and they have to make sure it isn't triggered by driving. That's not very convincing and I still don't see what the issue is but as the chap on the phone wasn't a technician it was pointless pursuing the discussion - I just established that they haven't had the dash out (don't want any rattles) and he assured me that it was just the back of the glove box that they need access too. They've loaned me an Aygo (a nice black one with 166 miles on the clock) and I'm working from home with nowhere to go anyway so I'm not particularly inconvenienced but I can't say I'm filled with confidence in whoever is fitting the sensor. It's clearly not supposed to be a big job - I was quoted (in writing) £301.34 for the catloc and tilt sensor - that doesn't come near the amount of labour it's had. Unless they've just parked it up and are drinking tea and watching Netflix. I will be asking questions when I finally pick the car up, and if possible would like to speak to the technician (when did mechanics become technicians? Is it like Marathons and Snickers?) who worked on it - what's the betting that they're on their day off? I shall return with an update when I have one....
  12. I appreciate that from the point of view of keeping the battery charged it doesn't matter whether the car is driven or just parked up in ready mode, but I prefer to take it for a drive because sitting in it in the driveway for 30 - 60 minutes is boring - it's counterproductive to vacuum the car because the vacuum is an electrical drain and there's only so much dusting you can do, and I've been through all the menus and settings and exhausted the novelty value there. I also find it somewhat disconcerting if I just sit in the car while it's in ready mode reading a book or something and then the engine suddenly fires up - it always takes me by surprise. So as I won't leave the car unattended in ready mode, I'd rather take it for a drive out, preferably somewhere scenic. And I enjoy driving it, and am not getting much opportunity to do so at the moment.
  13. Some ruminations while we're all locked down. I suppose it comes to us all. After 3 years with my Gen 3, 4 years with my Auris Hybrid and now 2 years with my current Gen 4 I have for the first time had to fix something on my car. Last night She Who Must Be Obeyed suggested I nip out for a chippy tea. That's not a suggestion I'm in the habit of arguing with so I jumped into the Prius to drive to the chippy (it's too far to walk, the chips would get cold). I haven't used the car for about 3 weeks since the latest lockdown as I'm working from home, so when the door mirrors seemed a bit sluggish as I unlocked the car my heart sank. And sure enough it wouldn't start and scolded me that the 12V battery was low. I had a couple of tries, but when it started strobing the house over the road with its headlamps I figured I ought to do something about it. So I disconnected my Ctek trickle charger / battery maintainer (I have a faster charger but I thought this was safer) from my 1961 Hillman Minx in the garage and hooked it up to the Prius. And that got me thinking. The Minx is my big boy's toy, does less than 1000 miles a year so the battery needs looking after - giving it a run does put a charge in but with a dynamo putting out around 22A maximum and a not terribly sophisticated two bobbin regulator it's just not enough - with use of the Ctek I usually get 6 or 7 years out of the battery. But the battery is either too flat to start the car (and it has a starting handle so if I'm feeling energetic I can get it going even when it's fairly flat) - or it's not. If it's got sufficient charge the car just starts. But the Prius....... I left it charging for a while, and when the charger reported it should be ready to start I gave it a go. And it started. Woo hoo. But then it started shouting at me that there was a problem with the hybrid system, there was a problem with the intelligent parking wotsit, there was a problem with the collision avoidance doofer, consult your dealer, do not pass go, do not collect £200. I'm not sure that I approve of being told off by my car. I have never come to terms with how judgemental the Gen 4 is when I turn it off, remarking that I shouldn't use my heater and such. Anyhow, I knew that I'd read about this kind of thing on here, so I came to have another look. I'm a regular lurker here but don't post much - I don't generally ask many questions because I find that if I scroll down a few pages I usually find that the question has already been answered (and because the cars are so boringly reliable that I don't have many questions) - and sure enough I found the answer. I'm not alone, other people have had that, and it's not a big deal. Keep restarting it and the scary messages will go away after a bit. So I did, and they went away, and now the car seems fine. Job's a good 'un, lesson learned, I'll be a bit more disciplined about making sure I run the car for half an hour or so at least once or twice a fortnight, or better take it for a drive, and I've also ordered one of those jump start thingies that somebody recommended a few pages back. Maybe invest in another trickle charger. Oh, and we didn't miss out on our chippy tea, I went and fetched it in SWMBO's little van. But my thoughts turned back to my Minx - I love driving it but it'll be 60 years old next March and I've had it for 35 of those years (I'm the second owner) so I know its limitations. It's very heavy to drive - no power steering, no power brakes, no power anything. It's slow, doesn't handle or stop well, is not very comfortable and lacks all the creature comforts we have come to take for granted. I wouldn't want to use it every day, and although I regularly used to I no longer feel comfortable taking it long distances - whereas I'm happy to drive my Prius for 2500 miles around Europe for a fortnight's holiday, happy to regularly drive 600 miles in a day to watch my football team away from home. But I know how the Minx works, I understand it. If I had to I could take the engine out, strip it to its component parts, knowing what each of them is, what it does and how it does it; and put it back together again, using just a few basic tools. If it's running poorly or won't start I can diagnose the problem using nothing more sophisticated than a 12V test lamp and my eyes and ears. And nobody wants to steal my exhaust. But the Prius? Oh, I've watched the YouTubes about how the HSD operates, I get the principle but I only open the bonnet to check the levels and that's it - other than that I leave the dealer to deal with it. And the thing is that none of my hybrids have needed me to do anything more than that until now. I used to carry a full set of tools so I could do roadside repairs. Now I don't even have a spare wheel (I would like one but am too indolent to do anything about it). We've gained a lot more than we've lost - I love my Prius, there's a reason I'm on my third Toyota hybrid - but I do sometimes feel a bit helpless with it. If it was less reliable maybe I'd have to make the effort to learn, but I'm not complaining about that. Still, it's a price worth paying - and if I feel a bit nostalgic for getting oil on my hands and grease in my hair I have what I need in the garage. Well, this is a story which didn't go anywhere much or shed any light on anything, but it has passed a few minutes in the telling, perhaps it may amuse. TL;DR, the 12V battery on the Prius can be an issue if you don't use the car. When you start it after charging it can throw up a load of error messages, but they go away after you restart it a few times. And old cars were much simpler, but nowhere near as good.
  14. Ooh, that's a bit niche. Think I'll stick with Priuses. But there's something quite comforting in the fact that more than 1.8 million people cared enough to cast a vote on the matter.
  15. Not many, priest and primo are two examples. But prig, prism and prince demonstrate that the vowel sound of the pri syllable doesn't uniformly rhyme with the examples you gave. There is one obscure word which contains the letters priu, and that's proprium. This is pronounced pro pree um in British English. But I don't think anybody should fear a visit from the pronunciation police for pronouncing it any other way. Probably best not to buy a Ford Ka as second car though. Qualifications, grade 6 Latin 'O' level (that's near as dammit a fail), speak a bit of French and am learning Spanish. So no qualifications at all, really. Has the plural of Prius been discussed by the way?
×
×
  • Create New...




Forums


News


Membership