Catlover

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Catlover last won the day on January 13

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About Catlover

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Profile Information

  • First Name
    Joe
  • Gender*
    Male
  • Toyota Model
    Prius 2016 Excel 15" wheels, Auris 2010 Hybrid T-Spirit (wifes).
  • Toyota Year
    2016
  • Location
    Cheshire
  • Interests
    Motorsport & Racing
    Food & Drink

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  1. I not an MoT expert, just like to think I act logically (sometimes). Yes, I heard testers don’t check the emissions cause they are considered low due to the fact the engine only runs say 40%-60% of the time. That does not imply that a Cat is not required, cause if it wasn’t emissions would be higher. Cat fitted or not can be spotted immediately the car is up in the air.
  2. Could well be that those Toyotas and Hondas, and possibly the other makes mentioned but not in the open yet, could have been manufactured in the Americas and certain parts sourced from different sources to vehicles manufactured in other parts of the world. Auris/Corolla for the UK market built in Burnaston, Derbyshire.
  3. Catlover

    Research

    I love the colour of blue James, looks really nice on the Auris, and the Yaris. And that was a useful review for others to read too.
  4. Was it ever said a driver would get full performance all the time? It’s the nature of a hybrid vehicle. F1 race cars dont deliver full performance the whole of the race, they depend on hybrid batteries for full performance too, have fans been lied to? Re the comment about “traditional cars”......”it will have same performance”. Are you sure??. Put Billy Bunter in the driving seat together with a full tank of fuel...will the car really get to 0-60 in the same time as with Slim Suzy driving and only a gallon of fuel?
  5. Penguin, have you researched how many early Gen3 Prius cars suffer from the oil burning? Is it as widespread as you may be thinking.? I ask because I bought my first Prius, 59 plate with 105k on the clock, owned for the previous 2 years by. Taxi driver who had done 50k miles in that time. No oil burning problems at all. Due to my experience my friend bought a 60 plate Gen3 with about 60k miles if I remember correctly. No blue smoke, no oil drips, but was using oil. That was the first time I had heard of the oil problem, and I had done a research before I bought mine, and my friend did his own research before he bought his. I had been on this forum for a few years before I bought my Gen3 and didn’t read of any problem. Maybe the problem is NOT a extent as you perceiving. It certainly would not put me off buying another Gen3 if I was in the market. As for the Auris, size wise it is smaller then a Prius Gen3. Slightly less boot space, slightly less rear passenger leg space, but still a good sized car, though the dash in the Auris is not as futuristic as the Prius. You see plenty of the mk1 Auris on the road, think they were something like 2006-2012, petrol/diesel/hybrid (from 2009), so you should easy find an Auris car to get a judgement of size, then find an Auris hybrid to buy. I bought an Auris Hybrid, 2010 model in summer 2015, now the wife’s car and done almost 75k miles with no oil burning issues at all. As said previously, Auris shares the same Hybrid engineering as the Prius including the engine. Whilst Auris was made in Petrol/diesel/hybrid, Prius has only been made as a Hybrid, be it Gen1,Gen2, Gen3 or Gen4. Finding a good Gen2 Prius will be a lot more difficult to find then a good Gen3 I reckon. My Gen4 Prius has the Cat in its original place, and no, I have not taken any security steps. ALL modern cars have a Cat of some sort, by law, they contain some precious metals like Palladium, which are expensive and in short supply. As Hybrids petrol engine is not running all the time there is less clogging up in the exhaust so they stay cleaner, making them more attractive to the thieves. Legislation is in place to ensure scrap metal is recorded, but lack of policing prevents checks being carried out properly, hence the thieves are getting away with it. Simply saying “stick the cat under the bonnet” maybe a lot more difficult to do then to say.
  6. 2009 model will either be the last of the Gen2 or an early Gen3. Gen2 still has a good reputation but I think it is a 1500cc engine, Gen3 are 1800 engines (and still are). I had a 59 plate Gen3, got it with 105 k miles and sold it with 110k miles, simply to get a Gen4 as I loved the Prius, now have 66 plate Gen4. The Hyndrid mechanics are rock solid, obviously well engineered from day 1, Priuswere introduced to UK in 1999, so been about a bit. My friend bought a 60 plate from a Toyota dealer. It burnt oil terribly, got it sorted under sale warranty, but not heard a lot of this problem. Other then that, not know of major problems. Did you know that the Auris has the same hybrid engineering the same as Gen3 Prius, exactly the same, but it’s shape will give less mpg. Auris generally is cheaper then an equivalent year Prius, so well worth you looking at an Auris, younger car for your money. Our first hybrid was a 60 plate Auris, I bought it, then gave to wife when I got the Gen3 Prius.
  7. Catlover

    Research

    The hybrid engineering is rock solid. You will find it a very relaxing car to drive. I had, and now the wife has it, a 2010 Auris Hybrid. The main components will be the same in a newer Auris. You will get better mpg in the summer then the winter, maybe 7-10 mpg less in the winter. This is because the computer will keep the engine running or maintain its warmth, plus you have cab heater, demister, heated rear window non more in the winter. Wife’s Auris does about 62mpg summer, 54 winter. A hybrid is a compromise, it has the benefit you don’t have to worry about plug in like you do with all electric. Electric cars have no engine but heavy battery. Hybrid has a heavy engine, plus a big battery not weighing as much as a full electric, but cannot go as far as a big battery electric only vehicle. Hence you heard a Auris hybrid will not do a great distance on battery only. And yes, around 21mph the engine kicks in, but just think that as long as you have enough charge in the hybrid battery you can go a longish way under 21mph ie town driving, queues etc. What you do find that you can be travelling at up to say 55Mph and with the right conditions, be travelling on hybrid battery power. Personally I don’t find high speed Mway driving (national speed limits) very conducive to good mpg, but it’s relative. I would think 55 maybe a bit more mpg. I don’t use cruise control on a Mway, I can ease more mpg by me controlling the right foot. Easy relaxed driving...... yes. The CVT gearbox cant really be compared to any other auto box, and it is well engineered. Driving the Auris hybrid is easy as a computer does all the thinking re hybrid battery/engine use, and you can barely feel the change between engine and battery drive and back again. Best move I did, and until battery cars can go longer before charges, and there are more charging stations available, hybrid is the way to go IMO.
  8. Oxygen, in your old Leon, did you ever do 0-100kph in 7.7 secs?
  9. Diesel heater plugs? One or more not working efficiently.
  10. Thanks FB’s. Similar news item just been reading on my tablet from BBC News. Worldwide shortage of Palladium, precious metal used in petrol car catalytic converters. Palladium is mostly sourced from Russia and Africa, that immediately tells me corruption will have a bearing on supply/costs. Since VW diesel gate scandal, a lot of diesel owners have changed over to petrol cars. Catalytic converters in diesel cars use Platinum as it’s more suited to diesel. So a big switch to petrol cars makes the supply of Palladium even more difficult. Rapidly increasing car sales in places like China and India also adds massively to the problem. Apparantly the cost of Palladium has increased by 25% in the last 2 weeks, and now stands about £1900 per ounce. Quoted from BBC...... “The Scrap Metal Dealer Act 2013 was supposed to make it harder for thieves to sell stolen components, by requiring dealers to be licensed and preventing them paying cash for scrap.” Reality..... “Trade association the British Metals Recycling Association has said stretched resources mean the police are unlikely to prosecute scrap dealers operating illegally”
  11. The 12v battery of an Auris Hybrid is in the boot. Its not the "usual" acid battery, which could split in the event of a rear end crash and battery acid spilt onto passengers, so its an AGM battery that is fitted, completely sealed therefore non spillable. Cost about £120 from Toyota dealer inc VAT. No cheaper anywhere else I dont think, I bought one which I thought I was being clever not going to Toyota dealer and it cost me £130 and 50 mile extra journey. Sounds like your battery on the way out, go to Mr T and ask them to check it out, being prepared mentally that a new battery is going to be the result. AGM or Absorbent Glass Mat is an advanced lead-acid battery that provides superior power to support the higher electrical demands of today's vehicles and start-stop applications. AGM batteries are extremely resistant to vibration, are totally sealed, nonspillable and maintenance-free.
  12. For a long time now each of the cars I have had, one wiper has been longer then the other. Usually drivers side longer. My current 2016 Prius, drivers side 28”, passenger side 16” (if I remember correctly). That covers a lot of screen, more so on the drivers side which is important. More efficient clean area. I can remember a car with just one wiper, that did look unusual, only problem was it left unwiped areas at each top corner, which was really bad viewing on the drivers side.
  13. What does it do- push in, pull out, twist left, twist right?
  14. When my Prius or the wife’s Auris hybrid due for service, on the phone booking I specify 0w-20 oil, and when I drop off the car I refer to 0w-20 oil again. I know manufacturers can’t be so specific these days, but if Mr T prefers 0w-20 in the hybrid engines, then that’s what I prefer to be put in. I don’t think there is anything wrong using 5w-30, tends to be a bit cheaper and that maybe why dealer/garages will want to use instead or 0w-20.
  15. If you do find whats wrong and find a solution, please come back and let us know.