PeteB

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Everything posted by PeteB

  1. I've found the figures I'm getting from full tank to full tank calculations are much more accurate on my RAV4 (about 1½-2% optimistic on average so far) than any other Toyotas I've logged over the last 19 years/350,000 miles or so.
  2. I did a 300 mile round trip into Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire yesterday, not a single sighting! However, saw a white with black roof (so Dynamic probably) with a lady driving it heading north on the A47 Gt Yarmouth bypass (in heavy traffic) an hour or two ago. That's number 4!
  3. My Excel has the JBL/PVM upgrade (assume that's what you have?) - no problems like that with mine (so far!). Reached 3300 miles today after a 300 mile trip, and lots of short journeys, so no shortage of starts. My only gripe is that the playlists on my USB stick (which worked fine with Gen 3 & 4 Prius, and several other models) won't work on this system.
  4. Been over 2 weeks since my last sighting, but another today as I entered Beccles in Suffolk - this one was Obsidian Blue (I think, may have been Decuma Grey - didn't have much time to study it due to busy traffic - it was entering a roundabout as I was leaving it). That makes number 3 if I don't count the local (not my) dealer's demonstrator and a second sighting of the same car (the one with personalised plates) a while back.
  5. The Hybrid battery gauge only shows a 'window' of the true State of Charge that the software allows for Hybrid running. If the gauge ever showed empty, SoC is really about 40%, and if it reached a true full (some time after the 8th bar lights up) it would really be about 80%. As Ian says, this is part of the secret of the long life of the Hybrid batteries (along with careful charge/discharge rate management and temperature control). You will rarely, if ever, experience a truly full battery (unless you live somewhere extremely hilly, like parts of Scotland) and never see zero bars lit. The behaviour of the Hybrid system changes subtly as the SoC reaches high or low values, as it likes to keep some room to receive 'free' energy when slowing or braking (especially downhill) and have enough in reserve to give a boost when you need max acceleration or to ascend a very steep hill. I'd covered over 70,000 miles in 4 years in my first Prius Gen 1s before I experienced my first HV battery "max out", but a holiday in Scotland made it a daily occurrence. When reaching the bottom of a 5-6 mile 20% (1 in 5) hill, you got a good idea what an EV would feel like as the Hybrid System tried like mad to use up some of the excess electricity so there'd be room for more free energy when braking or going down the next hill. The Gen 1 had no EV button, but while maxed out modest pressure on the accelerator would see electric only driving up to at least 60 mph! "Maxed out" doesn't just mean all the bars are lit - it takes quite a lot of extra regeneration after the eighth bar lights up before the system truly maxes out (like the fuel gauge, each bar covered a range of quantities). The car's behaviour changes when this happens, and you're likely to be very aware of it because the sound changes, but mostly the braking changes. It's still well power assisted, so won't be onerous, but B mode (S mode in some models like the RAV4 Hybrid) certainly seems to make it a bit less of a chore.
  6. When I had a test drive on the new 2019 RAV4 I checked with my decibel meter, which averaged 66 dB at 60 mph and 68-9 at 70 (on dry roads) - identical to the Gen 4 2016 Prius I owned at the time. The Prius was on 15" wheels, as was my previous 2012 Gen 3 Prius. The Gen 3 was switched to Dunlop Sport BluResponse (Eco B Wet A 68 dB) when the original Bridgestones needed replacing, and these made the car noticeably quieter.
  7. Surprising amount of manual tinkering - I expected it to be more automated. My dealer told me they would also have to replace the screen mounter camera/sensor housing too, I suppose due to the way it's bonded to the screen.
  8. Hi Martin, sorry for your misfortune. I had to have a replacement on my Gen 4 Prius with the added concern that it had a Head Up Display, and a couple of owners had found it wasn't displaying correctly after having a new screen. I got a quote of over £600 from my dealer to replace it and recalibrate everything, but gave my Insurance company's preferred supplier (Autoglass) a chance and luckily they did a fine job. I had to go to one of their fitting centres for the recalibration (they had specialist equipment on site) so they did the whole process in one visit with no problems. The guy even refitted my dashcam. I hope you manage to get yours done satisfactorily.
  9. I've used the key sequence to disable the fob for some time on my current and previous Toyotas (Toyota actually call it something like "battery saver"). This has worked on a Gen 3 Prius, Gen 4 Prius and my current Gen 5 RAV4, First lock or double lock the car. Then, while pressing and holding the lock button, press the unlock button twice. The little red light on the key gives two double flashes to confirm. I just look for this to confirm it's worked, and it's become an automatic habit. Easy enough to double check if in any doubt - put a hand in the handle and if the car doesn't unlock, it's worked. It does mean you have to press a key on the fob to get into the car next time, but that's no problem (to me, anyway). I've also put the spare key into battery saver mode. A £90,000 Range Rover was recently stolen in my area while the key was said to be inside a Faraday pouch, it was suspected either the pouch was not sufficiently good quality or the spare key had not been protected or disabled.
  10. Glad you got it sorted.
  11. I've used the key sequence to disable the fob for some time on my current and previous Toyotas (Toyota actually call it something like "battery saver"). This has worked on a Gen 3 Prius, Gen 4 Prius and my current Gen 5 RAV4, First lock or double lock the car. Then, while pressing and holding the lock button, press the unlock button twice. The little red light on the key gives two double flashes to confirm. I just look for this to confirm it's worked, and it's become an automatic habit. Easy enough to double check if in any doubt - put a hand in the handle and if the car doesn't unlock, it's worked. It does mean you have to press a key on the fob to get into the car next time, but that's no problem (to me, anyway). I've also put the spare key into battery saver mode. A £90,000 Range Rover was recently stolen in my area while the key was said to be inside a Faraday pouch, it was suspected either the pouch was not sufficiently good quality or the spare key had not been protected or disabled.
  12. My Gen 4 (2016) Prius did this on the odd very rare occasion, but more often if it set a high limit (over 100) it saw it as MPH! However, it often picked up signs at the start of side roads or roundabout exits while passing them, and also often picked a limit that seemed to have no rhyme or reason - I was on the lookout for possible signs on lorries etc, but often nothing was obvious. It was inaccurate at least 40% of the time in the Prius, more annoying in that car because if it thought I was speeding a red speed limit sign replaced the Hybrid System Indicator in the Head Up Display (HUD). For that reason, mine was permanently switched off, and lots of other Prius owners said the same. If yours is the first version of Safety Sense like that of Prius, I believe it's unlikely to be very reliable. That version only used the camera, and wasn't backed up by the SatNav, unlike the much improved version in the 2019 RAV4 (and probably new Corollas). At least it doesn't cause problems with the HUD on the RAV4 - since it doesn't have one even on the new version.
  13. My dealer has normally been quite competitive on price, and when I worked in London I actually got a Kwikfit to price match my dealer when I needed 4 tyres and couldn't get to Norwich for a while! That said, I've had good service from a couple of Kwikfit branches over the years, but have only used them the once since I started using my Norwich dealer in 2002. Like many businesses, I think it's down to the individual branch manager as much as anything.
  14. In this part of the East of England there are still very few places to charge away from home, and I still wouldn't have chosen a Tesla with a 300 mile range because although the situation has improved very slightly, it's still going to be a major challenge to do some of my longer trips, especially if a charging point I plan to rely on is unavailable. In fact, on one of the 250 mile round trips I do once or twice most months, several charging points have actually ceased to exist since demise of Little Chefs (which are now a mixture of Burger King/Greggs shared sites, McDonalds or Starbucks). The 4th Gen Prius that I bought just over 3 years ago more or less cured me of a desire for an EV since I could fill it with unleaded from almost empty for about £45 and then do over 600 miles before refuelling again. I had expected to keep this car until developing health issues see my driving licence revoked, but reckoned without the lowness of the car causing severe hip pains that started spreading to knees and back due to the strain I put on them getting in and out awkwardly while to try to minimise the pain. My new RAV4 will also do about 600 miles on a tank, thanks to a much larger tank that takes about £60 to fill 🥺. It still goes further on each gallon than a tiny 600cc Fiat 126 I owned in the 1970s, despite it's weight, 2½ litre petrol engine and aerodynamics akin to a house brick towing a parachute! Plus, my hips are now 80-90% better and I no longer need the 8-10 strong painkillers I had been taking daily. This car had definitely better be my last!
  15. That reminds me - on my last Prius Excel the uprated sound system (with ten speakers) was standard. Surprised it's not the same on the RAV4.
  16. Not to mention when I specified 15" I got a £400 rebate off the price of my old 2016 Excel. I believe they are generally quieter too, although it depends to some extent on the tyres chosen.
  17. The Honda salesman I spoke to when looking at the C-RV as an alternative to my RAV4 mentioned this, but for the foreseeable future I'd still insist on a space saver and prefer a full size spare. This is obviously a step forward (especially compared to the days when the AAs T&Cs excluded rescuing a motorist who "failed to carry a serviceable spare wheel"!). My concern would be whether, if I needed one and had no alternative, the AA van had one on board or had already given out as many as were carried - wonder how many they carry? Many moons ago I cycled to work, partly along the Thames tow path from Weybridge to Walton on Thames. Unfortunately, I got rather a lot of punctures, and the cycle shop sold me a couple of "airless" tyres. They had a sort of honeycomb structure inside, and felt a bit weird, as they 'wobbled' slightly on the rim as I turned the wheel (not enough to be dangerous, just disconcerting until I got used to it). For cars, I'm pinning my hopes on developments along these lines:
  18. PeteB

    2017 vs 2019

    It is a shame about the wireless charger - I actually bought a new phone to take advantage of the one in my 2016 Prius Excel. There's quite a few nice things that the newer, more expensive RAV4 Excel doesn't have that I miss from the Prius Excel, not to mention the things other RAV4 markets get that we can't even pay extra for, like ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, heater front windscreen, camera-based rear view mirror, heated washer jets and kick sensor for hands free opening of the rear door. I think it was TomfromFife that obtained a diagram and part number for the wireless charger after he found the connector was under the front of the console, but I see it's between £500-£600! I'll stick with my £12 one! The Chevrolet Bolt had a power washer for the rear camera. Toyota are very slow at picking up some things. I used to drive to London very early in the morning and for several months of the year the door mirrors would mist up on the way in. By the mid 1980s I thought I'd never have to drive another car without heated mirrors, but even on top spec Toyotas they weren't fitted until the 2012 face-lifted Gen 3 Prius, which also gained electric folding mirrors that weren't automatic. One of my staff bought a second hand Fiesta (not even a very high spec one) in 2005 which had auto folding mirrors. Also I miss the Head Up Display the Prius has had for 10 years, which some much cheaper cars now have. I also now appreciate just how effective the Prius laminated front side windows with the sound absorbing inter-layer were when a noisy diesel or someone with thumping music stops alongside my RAV4 which doesn't have them.
  19. These are the sorts oi things you get:
  20. PeteB

    2017 vs 2019

    Was your demo a 2WD? The 4WD,m with the extra electric motor/generator on the rear axle has no hesitation at all. The Gen 2 & 3 Prius had a top and bottom glovebox as well as the cubby under the centre armrest - I had no trouble getting my iPad in the bottom glovebox, as well as my SR shape digital camera. [The Gen 4 Prius got one small glovebox and lost the space under the boot floor, which coupled with the poor rear headroom- probably explains why taxi firms no longer favour it.] I tend to think of the Excel as the top equipment model (a Toyota person on their blog said the same too), wile the extra cost of the Dynamic is for the extra trim bits and wheels that would otherwise be £600 extra. No wireless phone charging on any UK model. I've bought this for about £12 on eBay (see pic)
  21. I think the problem was with older gunge formulae - it's likely more recent versions have been improved to be less of a problem, but interesting what my manual says about the sensor.
  22. There can be other considerations - on my car the manual says not to use a space saver on thebfront in snow/ice, so if you get a front puncture the recommended action is to remove a rear wheel, fit space saver, remove front wheel, fit wheel from rear. I wonder how many would do it, or even read the manual. Also, book says don't tow if space saver fitted - so what do you do if you have a trailer and a flat tyre? Plus, the rubber has a finite life, usually about 5 years. If you keep a car for a long time (as I plan to) at least with a full size spare you can put it on the car when replacing tyres and put a new one in the boot. I wouldn't be keen to make an emergency manoeuvre with a space saver fitted, especially in wet conditions. But I'd rather have a space saver than gunge.
  23. and my manual says to replace the TPWS sensor too. The one I bought for my full size spare wheel was almost £90! A few years ago I heard of someone who got a puncture 3 miles from home on a wet Friday night about 11 pm. Gunge ran out f hole in tyre. AA took over 2 hours to arrive (it was a very wet Friday night!). Got him and car with flat tyre home between 2 and 3 am. Saturday took wheel in taxi to nearest town with tyre shop. Not in stock, 2 hours to fetch. Taxi home. Taxis cost more than tyre, big chunk of Saturday lost. We each have decided our own priorities.
  24. Of course it will vary according to preference, experience, amount and type of driving and many other factors. It's true, in the last few years, I've only had a few slow punctures that with the help of my own aftermarket Tyre Pressure Monitoring System (as opposed to Warning System that's built-in) I've made it to my dealer without changing the wheel (this has a small display that shows the actual pressure all 5 tyres, and monitors temperatures too - Google Tyrepal if you want to know more)). If I get to the stage where I only ever drive a few miles from home (as one or two older neighbours do), I would think differently, and maybe even consider an EV. However, since 2000, I've driven nearly 400,000 miles (about 320,000 in Hybrids, BTW) and had almost 20 occasions where a wheel change was necessary. Four of those would absolutely certainly not have been repairable with gunge (especially one where there wasn't a shred of rubber left on the rim by the time I got to the hard shoulder! - unless there is some very clever gunge available!) three more where success of gunge would be dubious and the remainder where it would probably have worked. I avoided space savers as long as possible (a trip on the M1 at 50 mph in a Volvo with one was hair raising, to say the least). My RAV4 came with one, but as there's room under the boot floor for a full size, I bought one. I've heard of a few stories of people who've been massively inconvenienced by the gunge not working, and a couple who didn't even know they had no spare wheel until they were informed by the AA/RAC person they'd called to fit it!